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Hi Rebel, you must live down south because there is no way you can take a motorcycle out for a 5 mile ride every month in the New England Winter. The bike has to be put away for a 6 month hibernation... sometimes we humans need to do that same.
I'm currently in the south, yes. I'm originally from the north. You can surely take it out for a few miles a month. They don't clear the roads ever by you? Man up, add some layers and go!
 

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There are two methods of storing a bike when it comes to the fuel system. Complete removal or treatment.

Removal: A marine fuel line with primer bulb for outboard engines and 3-5 gal. fuel carrier is the easiest way to remove fuel from the tank if you choose to go this route. Just open the fuel fill, stick the correct end of the line in the tank and the other into the carrier. Squeeze the bulb till fuel starts flowing. Gravity will do the rest. Remove all that you can. Run the bike until it runs dry. Your done.

Treatment: Use a storage treatment stabilizer such as Stabil by adding the correct amount and then filling the tank full to allow proper mixing. Run the bike for several miles to circulate the treated fuel throughout the fuel system. Park and your done.

For long term storage up to six months, you should also consider using a marine fogging oil in the engine cylinders to avoid pitting caused by rust due to moisture. Carefully remove the spark plugs and spray the oil through the plug hole in each cylinder. Carefully replace the spark plugs without damaging the igniter and tighten them to spec. This is also a good time to check the spark plug gap and condition.

Note: If going the stabilizer route and you live in a mandatory Ethanol area, be sure to use a stabilizer designed to be compatible with ethanol.

The marine fuel line/primer bulb can be purchased at Walmart, Acadamy, or any sporting goods store that has a fishing/boating section for less than $20.00. A boat dealership will also have them but expect to pay more.
 

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Do not run your tank dry. The fuel pump in the tank is cooled and lubricated by the gas it is pumping. Running it dry is the fastest way to ruin it. If you remove the fuel for storage make sure to disconnect the battery so you don't accidently run the fuel pump while its dry.
This being said if you ever run out of gas turn the key off imeadiately.
 

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Just doing what I have learned from others and my own readings - fill the tank to the top - it is a metal tank and you do not want condensation forming in it - rust. I also use fuel stabilizer, run the engine a few minutes, unhook the battery and attach a "tender" to it, cover the cycle with something that will not allow moisture to develop under it. I also use a rear jack stand to life the rear tire off the floor for the few months of storage.
 

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I do what Rebel13 does, or at least I used to, when I lived in the frozen tundra (Massachusetts). Now that I live in the Southeast, I have a 10-month riding season with ridable days.

Since I work from home and gas can start to degrade quickly, I start my bike at least 1x per week. Even if I don't sneak out for a ride.

If you have a window where you are storing it, open it, start up the bike and run it for a couple of minutes just to mix the fluids around. Plan to change all the filters you can get to come spring and enjoy the 1st spring ride.

I have a battery tender pigtail on my battery and I used to leave it charging over the winter rather than risk it fully discharging.

Hope this helps.
 

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If you forego the stabil use and drain the tank (i did this when lived upstate NY during winter storage) ... empty tank, then spray with wd40 inside to prevent rust corrosion forming from moisture for 3 months (or more) . Equally as important is
get your wheels off the ground OR rotate frequently to avoid flat spots on your tires.
Winter rides are fun, but lotsa salt on the road in snow ice areas. Is it worth having to clean all that corrosive sodium off your bike ? I had my snomobile during the winter months .... That i miss even though i have gone to snow parks way up north in California. Up around reno sierras.... those mountains get dumped on heavy .... comparable to Montanna and south dakota, and the lake effect snows in NY . LW
 

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cali rides

One of the big factors for me buying another bike was the capability to ride
virtually year round in california. Yes you get rainy season, but for the most part just need to add gloves, and pair of long-johns during this interim. On the flip side it gets da*m hot here during the summer months :p which i think is worst than being cold. Does'nt hurt to throw a bottle of christy dry gas in tank during rainy season. Moisture can plaque your fill-up station too ! LW

I do what Rebel13 does, or at least I used to, when I lived in the frozen tundra (Massachusetts). Now that I live in the Southeast, I have a 10-month riding season with ridable days.

Since I work from home and gas can start to degrade quickly, I start my bike at least 1x per week. Even if I don't sneak out for a ride.

If you have a window where you are storing it, open it, start up the bike and run it for a couple of minutes just to mix the fluids around. Plan to change all the filters you can get to come spring and enjoy the 1st spring ride.

I have a battery tender pigtail on my battery and I used to leave it charging over the winter rather than risk it fully discharging.

Hope this helps.
 

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Stabil works. Used for my boats and lawnmowers for years. The only time I had an issue with gas turning bad was the one time I failed to use stabil. Not scientific, but good enough for me and since my boats, bikes, and mowers have always run just fine after using it AND millions of others use it without issue, there's no reason to think it harms anything. So I will continue to use it.

Incidentally, I still run my bikes every few weeks in the winter even though I use the Stabil. They are stored in an unheated attached garage. Of course, if the weather is good, I'm riding them :)
 

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residual gas in extremeties

When i had a manual pet**** ... the reserve valve ...used to be able to drain gas from there by removing clip off a piece of rubber gas line. I would be concerned of residual gas in the fuel line gumming up the works ...
Pump out by cranking engine ? LW

There are two methods of storing a bike when it comes to the fuel system. Complete removal or treatment.

Removal: A marine fuel line with primer bulb for outboard engines and 3-5 gal. fuel carrier is the easiest way to remove fuel from the tank if you choose to go this route. Just open the fuel fill, stick the correct end of the line in the tank and the other into the carrier. Squeeze the bulb till fuel starts flowing. Gravity will do the rest. Remove all that you can. Run the bike until it runs dry. Your done.

Treatment: Use a storage treatment stabilizer such as Stabil by adding the correct amount and then filling the tank full to allow proper mixing. Run the bike for several miles to circulate the treated fuel throughout the fuel system. Park and your done.

For long term storage up to six months, you should also consider using a marine fogging oil in the engine cylinders to avoid pitting caused by rust due to moisture. Carefully remove the spark plugs and spray the oil through the plug hole in each cylinder. Carefully replace the spark plugs without damaging the igniter and tighten them to spec. This is also a good time to check the spark plug gap and condition.

Note: If going the stabilizer route and you live in a mandatory Ethanol area, be sure to use a stabilizer designed to be compatible with ethanol.

The marine fuel line/primer bulb can be purchased at Walmart, Acadamy, or any sporting goods store that has a fishing/boating section for less than $20.00. A boat dealership will also have them but expect to pay more.
 

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We regularly start the bikes in the winter and let them run. If it's a decent day my husband will take them out for a quick blast but only if it hasn't snowed recently. They are using calcium chloride( I think that's the name) around here on the roads now, nasty nasty stuff.
 

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I've been a start and run at least every 2 week person. Most modern fuel pumps in autos as well as other vehicles run submersed in the fuel tank. Many vehicle manufacturers warn that running with low fuel can harm the pump due to a lack of cooling that the fuel supplies. I'll will start using a stabilizing additive in the next week or so. Typically I have used Seafoam due to the ethanol used in all fuels in my locale.

Jack
 

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I'm putting my CTX away for the winter and want to drain/empty fuel tank.
The bike is being kept in a basement where the temp stays at 60 and humidity btw 35%-40% humidity.
I have treated the fuel with stabil and rode bike. I am going to siphon gas out prior to putting it inside. Is it bad for the fuel pump to run engine till it quits? Or just siphon and leave remaining treated fuel in the system. I have also heard of coating the inside of the fuel tank with either fogging oil or wd-40, not sure if thats really needed and advisable.
I could understand draining the tank if it is a fire hazard you are worried about. Otherwise, don't bother.
 

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OMG!!! SO many old tales of stupid.
1 - Tires are made of rubber. Rubber is flexible. In all my years of riding - 25 years plus - I have never had a flat spot and it gets -30°F here and we store bikes here for 4-6 months at a time. I just put the kickstand down and let the tires sit on the garage floor.
If a spot were to form, it will pop back.
2 - NO I cant go for a ride every week. As mentioned above it gets cold here. AND with all the salt I dont want my bike to get any of that crude on it. SO after the spring rains have washed the crude away I'll bring my bike out. YOU can do whatever YOU like. I also wont ride below 50°F. At 55mph at 50°F the wind chill is brutal!
3 - Please dont just start the engine and let it run 10 minutes. You are inducing moisture doing that. Leaving the engine sit for 6 months at a time is no problem.
4 - In all my adult life - I'm almost 60 - I have had zero gas problems with engines sitting over the winter. Some of those times it was not treated.
I do use Seafoam now, but does it really do anything?? But I do agree with a full tank and some kind of treatment. If only for a fell good thing.
I have a small tank for my weed whipper. Its a 2 cycle so I cant use the gas in my car. I use it very little. In the spring the gas I use will be 4 years old. It still works fine.
I do add a bit of seafoam to the tank each fall. We have had E10 hear since the mid 80s. I have had zero problems with that gas.
Do some have problems? Maybe but I think after some time some extra pieces have been added to the story of the gas is bad.

Kind of like religion or politics or global warming we each form our our opinion/beliefs. I wont change your mind and you wont change mine.
We hear things and pass them along without knowing if they really are a thing or not.
 

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A good thing to do for all your engines before putting them away for a season is to make sure they are filled with, and running on, non-ethanol gasoline. Pure gasoline will stay fresh for at least twice as long as the ethanol-adulterated stuff (ethanol is best for drinking, not running engines). Here's where you can find pure gasoline in your area:
pure-gas.org/

Another good source of pure gas is a small local airport. Ethanol is illegal to use in aircraft (must be some reason).
 

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A good thing to do for all your engines before putting them away for a season is to make sure they are filled with, and running on, non-ethanol gasoline. Pure gasoline will stay fresh for at least twice as long as the ethanol-adulterated stuff (ethanol is best for drinking, not running engines). Here's where you can find pure gasoline in your area:
pure-gas.org/

Another good source of pure gas is a small local airport. Ethanol is illegal to use in aircraft (must be some reason).
Engine failure due to component degradation is a pretty significant reason.... :D
 

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I have owned products with gasoline engines for over 50 years. I always put them away in the off season by filling with ethanol free fuel,a bit of fuel stabilizer, run them through a heat cycle.l live in Ontario which has winter with cool to very coldweather for up to 6 sometimes 7 months. I have never taken the battery out, but stick a small charger on it every month to keep the battery up. My generator some years sits for 12 months never started. It always starts with 1 or 2 pulls. Never had a problem with anything. Think about this. New bikes, new cars, and a lot of other rubber tire equipped machines sit from new in storage until sold. Inside or outside with just enough fuel in them to start them. You then buy said piece of equipment or vehicle and never question were it was from date of mfg to date of sale. Tires are fine and you never see a dealer throw a new set of tires on that car for you. Years ago before radial tires were introduced, we had all bias ply tires. If they sat all night in the cold winter, they developed flat spots. You drove them a few miles and the flat spot disapeared. Storing a vehicle is a very simple thing to do. Sounds to me that some are way over thinking this. In Canadian winters you sure are not going to take a joy ride on your bike with all the snow, ice, salt and up to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit.
 

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One good way to test fuel stabilizer is to test the results. Put ethanol fuel in a jar, lid on tight, and let it sit without moving it for a few months. You will probably see a layer of water on the bottom of the jar and fuel at the top. Do the same with stabilizer in another jar. That would answer the question about ethanol.
 

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I have filled the tank with alkylate gasoline. It is an excellent option for the winter storage. It doesn't evaporate and is alcohol-free. I can buy it from regular gas stations and the price is only 10-15 cents more than 98 octane gasoline.
 
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