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I'm putting my CTX away for the winter and want to drain/empty fuel tank.
The bike is being kept in a basement where the temp stays at 60 and humidity btw 35%-40% humidity.
I have treated the fuel with stabil and rode bike. I am going to siphon gas out prior to putting it inside. Is it bad for the fuel pump to run engine till it quits? Or just siphon and leave remaining treated fuel in the system. I have also heard of coating the inside of the fuel tank with either fogging oil or wd-40, not sure if thats really needed and advisable.
 

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Just a question for you. I am not being critical. Why do you want to remove the fuel from the fuel system and tank? If you treat the fuel with stabilizer and make sure it gets all the way thru the fuel system you should be fine. Air is the catylist in creating varnish. Fill the tank full and add the treatment and run for a good 15 minutes.

I use sta-bil, sea foam works well also. I am sure others here have reccomendations also.
This works for everything, 2 stroke weed eaters up to cars. Just pay attention to how much additive you need per gallon of gas you are treating and run the vehicle long enough to get the additive through the fuel system.

Good luck either way you choose,

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just a question for you. I am not being critical. Why do you want to remove the fuel from the fuel system and tank? If you treat the fuel with stabilizer and make sure it gets all the way thru the fuel system you should be fine. Air is the catylist in creating varnish. Fill the tank full and add the treatment and run for a good 15 minutes.

I use sta-bil, sea foam works well also. I am sure others here have reccomendations also.
This works for everything, 2 stroke weed eaters up to cars. Just pay attention to how much additive you need per gallon of gas you are treating and run the vehicle long enough to get the additive through the fuel system.

Good luck either way you choose,

Tom
I didn't want to have 2.5 gal of gas sitting in the basement and also I would have fresh gas in the spring after refilling.
 

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I didn't want to have 2.5 gal of gas sitting in the basement and also I would have fresh gas in the spring after refilling.

I can see what you mean. I would run whatever stabilizer (I like Seafoam), you feel comfortable with for a few minutes thru the engine, stop the engine, then drain the gas out of the tank. That should work for winter storage in your basement. The gas you drain out .... put into our car, let's say, and use it up. Personally, I store my bikes in the garage, which IS part of the house, and add Seafoam to the fuel mix and run the bikes for a few minutes. After than I'm done, till it's wakee wakee for the bikes several months later (3-4 months). I do live in Florida.
 

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Storage-Fuel

Hi

Just put my new 2014 CTX (25 miles) in for winter storage into a shed. Its only exposed to temperature not snow or rain fall.
Do I need to install fuel stabilizer? The manual doesn't state it or I missed it in the fine print.

Thanks

David
 

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Hi

Just put my new 2014 CTX (25 miles) in for winter storage into a shed. Its only exposed to temperature not snow or rain fall.
Do I need to install fuel stabilizer? The manual doesn't state it or I missed it in the fine print.

Thanks

David[/QUOTE


I would. Run the bike for ten minutes to get it in to the fuel system.
 

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If you leave an empty tank you will get condensation in the tank. WATER......worse than the "stale"gas.

A full tank will not get that. Add the stabilizer to a full tank. Run some to get gas into the carbs, and put it away With battery tender for the winter. That has worked for years for many bikes. Garage or storage building.
 

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Others with more technical savvy can confirm this, but I believe that since the bike is fuel injected there are no "carbs."
 

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There are no carbs on this bike, but does have a filter, pump, lines and injectors that easily clog. If fuel sits for long periods of time, it will turn to a gum starting in the smallest crevices and spreading turning hard after time. It is always best to keep a full tank to prevent corrosion. I have zero experience with fuel stabilizers and don't know what all it really does if anything good, I don't believe in mystery oils!

What I do with any engine, I run it! Run it at least once a month for at least 10 mins with various rpms and mixing tank. This keeps everything cycling instead of settling. Easist way to do this on a bike, just take at least a 5 mile ride once a month, this helps everything else cycle besides the fuel too, everything down to the tires~ Then when you decide to ride it again, ride the tank near empty before refilling, you will never have a problem! The same goes for all carbed and EFI engines.
 

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. I have zero experience with fuel stabilizers and don't know what all it really does if anything good, I don't believe in mystery oils!
A fuel stabilizer is most definitely not a mystery oil! gasoline will degrade over time losing octane. A fuel stabilizer will greatly extend the time period it takes for this to happen. This isn't necessary for engines that are used often as the gas is burned before it degrades too much but for things that get put up and not used for an extended period of time it may save you from a lot of future grief.
 

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A fuel stabilizer is most definitely not a mystery oil! gasoline will degrade over time losing octane. A fuel stabilizer will greatly extend the time period it takes for this to happen. This isn't necessary for engines that are used often as the gas is burned before it degrades too much but for things that get put up and not used for an extended period of time it may save you from a lot of future grief.
It is a mystery oil, do you have any proof it works or not? Ok, you read the label like everyone else~ I previously stated what happens to untreated fuel and how to avoid it. Neglect is neglect, everyone looks for a quick and cheap answer to repair things. Buying a $5 dollar product and dropping in without doing anything is boohockey! Stabilizer, sea foam, fuel treatment etc. they are just a band aid, not an actual fix or preventative!
 

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It is a mystery oil, do you have any proof it works or not? Ok, you read the label like everyone else~ I previously stated what happens to untreated fuel and how to avoid it. Neglect is neglect, everyone looks for a quick and cheap answer to repair things. Buying a $5 dollar product and dropping in without doing anything is boohockey! Stabilizer, sea foam, fuel treatment etc. they are just a band aid, not an actual fix or preventative!
Do I personally have any proof that it works? Why, of course not. I don't disagree with any part of your previous post except when you said a fuel stabilizer to be a mystery oil. You are right in that it is not a fix, it will do nothing to restore old gas but I believe it does extend the storage longevity when it is added to fresh gasoline. You've stated your opinion on the matter, I have stated mine.The original poster has the right to hear both and decide for himself what he believes.
 

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You can't prove anything, I will! This is the petcock of the last bike I have restored during breakdown for an example here. Top tube on left is the reserve filter it feeds to the top left hole, top tube on right is primary feed line feeds to top right hole(the filter is above picture and all clean). Bottom hole is the feed line to intake in either position.

Now this bike has been sitting for five years before I broke it down! It is clear the previous owner didn't cycle the reserve location here! If fuel settles, what happens?
I have cleaned what I could with tools alone and looks this is it before reinstall. I could have use carb cleaner and done even better.

I removed both filters, they have been replaced with an in-line fuel filter. The new fuel has broken up the remaining residue, want pics for more proof, I can take one of the new fuel filter if needed. Point here prooves everything I said it settles you get what and if you cycle what happens?
 

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I'm putting my CTX away for the winter and want to drain/empty fuel tank.
The bike is being kept in a basement where the temp stays at 60 and humidity btw 35%-40% humidity.
I have treated the fuel with stabil and rode bike. I am going to siphon gas out prior to putting it inside. Is it bad for the fuel pump to run engine till it quits? Or just siphon and leave remaining treated fuel in the system. I have also heard of coating the inside of the fuel tank with either fogging oil or wd-40, not sure if thats really needed and advisable.
I see arguments here about storing your bike for winter. Your basement is well weather protected and low humidity and that is very good. You treated the fuel system with a known product that has been around awhile which adds confidence to your logic of proper storage. You are removing excess gas in your house by siphoning out the gas (maybe just a precaution but I don't blame you). I doubt you can get all the fuel out but running it till it stops is one way to try. I personally would have left all the treated gas in the system so seals don't dry out but again your choice. I have used wd40 to prevent rust in tanks myself after hosing them out so know fogging does prevent rust. Problem would be it will have to be flushed with fresh gas so first start my foul the plugs with wd40 but eventually gas would wash it out.

Now since you asked, there are those who think they know what is best for you (or best to store a bike as you have done). They even argue over what they know or don't know (sounds more of what they think or have limited experience with.. imho). One key element is time. You did not say how long and that is a key element to your question. I think your bike will be fine come next spring. Lets us know then.
 
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I don't want to come across as if I know this as a fact personally, but some will say that ethanol-fortified fuel (E10), which is 95% of all gas sold @ stations across the country and is all that is available in some states, may cause problems during storage, i.e. absorb water, and can cause an engine not to start when one tries to run it the next season. I don't know technically what happens of if this is just a myth, but it's purported to be a pretty common phenomenon for small engines; not sure about on-road vehicles, but it's enough of a commonly-held belief where I live to make me take precautions with regards to E10 gas and storing gas-powered equipment of any type.

I buy pure gas and fill up the tank and add stabilizer for my lawn mower and would probably do the same thing for my CTX if I were going to store it. In fact, I buy pure gas all the time for both my lawn mower and my bike just for the added fuel efficiency and to protest the fact that the gov't is trying to force us to use ethanol. Not to get too political, but I want to make it plain that I'm not against renewable fuels. I've used biodiesel blends in my diesel car always with great results, but to me, ethanol policy is not smart, only because it has such low energy density compared to petroleum-based fuels, and I feel like we should have a choice in the market, which has been stifled by a renewable fuel standard that requires so many billions of gallons of ethanol blended into our fuel stocks.

If pure gas is available in your area, it's usually about $.15-$.20 higher, because it is so hard for retailers to get and is considered a boutique fuel, and the added fuel efficiency won't make up for the price difference, but it does equalize it some. At $3 a gallon, you can get around 3% better mpg, and if you're paying $.20 more for pure gas, you're really only paying about $.11 more after adding in the mpg gain.

From what I understand, however, drivers in some states don't have the option of pure gasoline due to the formulation requirements. The following link is a pretty complete and updated list of pure gas retail locations throughout the U.S. Canada if anyone is interested.

Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I see arguments here about storing your bike for winter. Your basement is well weather protected and low humidity and that is very good. You treated the fuel system with a known product that has been around awhile which adds confidence to your logic of proper storage. You are removing excess gas in your house by siphoning out the gas (maybe just a precaution but I don't blame you). I doubt you can get all the fuel out but running it till it stops is one way to try. I personally would have left all the treated gas in the system so seals don't dry out but again your choice. I have used wd40 to prevent rust in tanks myself after hosing them out so know fogging does prevent rust. Problem would be it will have to be flushed with fresh gas so first start my foul the plugs with wd40 but eventually gas would wash it out.

Now since you asked, there are those who think they know what is best for you (or best to store a bike as you have done). They even argue over what they know or don't know (sounds more of what they think or have limited experience with.. imho). One key element is time. You did not say how long and that is a key element to your question. I think your bike will be fine come next spring. Lets us know then.
I ended up treating fuel and rode about 10 miles and then siphoned tank (almost) dry and put in my basement. Again, dry 40% humidity and 60 degrees. It will sit there till april or so.
The reason I asked about draining or running dry is because on my 2 Yamaha 4 stroke outboards they don't want you to run the fuel pump dry.
Also, if I can limit/avoid having 2 gallons of gas sitting inside my house that too is a good thing.
Since I siphoned tank and did not run dry, the issue of seals drying shouldn't be an issue I would think..
 

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For over a decade I have stored motorcycles and boats in Wisconsin for the winter, Indoors dry but no heat. I have always stored with full tanks and the recommended Stabil. Both diesel and gas engines.A couple of gallons up to just under 200 gallons. Not once have I had a fuel/air related problem.
 

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What I do with any engine, I run it! Run it at least once a month for at least 10 mins with various rpms and mixing tank. This keeps everything cycling instead of settling. Easist way to do this on a bike, just take at least a 5 mile ride once a month, this helps everything else cycle besides the fuel too, everything down to the tires~ Then when you decide to ride it again, ride the tank near empty before refilling, you will never have a problem! The same goes for all carbed and EFI engines.
Hi Rebel, you must live down south because there is no way you can take a motorcycle out for a 5 mile ride every month in the New England Winter. The bike has to be put away for a 6 month hibernation... sometimes we humans need to do that same.
 
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