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Discussion Starter #1
So we have 3.xx gallons.

How much of that is usable? My fuel light was on this morning, so like a good boy I ignored it for a while, then filled up close to my destination. Filled up with 2.616 gallons.

What is the 'ruh-roh' line?

I got 184 miles, and @ 70mpg according to fuelly. Not bad for a break-in tank!
 

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I'd say you probably reached it! The tank holds 3.28 gals. The warning light will start to flash at 0.98 gals. Taking into consideration driving habits and gauge accuracy, you can figure roughly 45-50 miles till your pounding the pavement after the light begins to flash. I drove from Conroe to Huntsville, Texas, approx. 35 miles, on I-45 doing 75mh with just one bar. Had 0.2 gals. left when I filled up. oops!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds good. Most scoots I have owned also have what I would call "sh*t gauge syndrome". So I go til it flashes and then figure on stopping within 25 miles, just in case :p.

Still, a usable range of 180-200 miles ain't bad! Even at freeway speeds it should be well over 150.
 

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.

Still, a usable range of 180-200 miles ain't bad! Even at freeway speeds it should be well over 150.
I never got 180-200, my max is 120 assuming red light starts flashing. This is inside city commute, Drive mode, 87 gasoline and I typically start/stop very smooth.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
When the red light starts, you're supposed to have .98 gallons left. That should be enough to get a ways, unless you're in the middle of nowhere. I usually just take note of when it starts flashing and get gas within 25 miles.

Perhaps on purpose, the fuel indicator on the Honda Helix is very similar. It starts flashing WAY ahead of time, letting you know that you should get gas SOMEDAY.
 

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I've found over the years Honda fuel sensors to be pretty accurate. When the gauge reads empty, your about to start walking. The only way to accurately determine your fuel range is to keep track of your fuel usage over a period of 5 or 6 fill ups by dividing the amount of miles travelled by the amount of fuel required at each fill up. Multiply the average amount used over this period by 3.2. That should give you a fair estimate as to how far you can travel on 1 tank of gas. Once you have this number, you should be able to estimate how much farther you can travel once the fuel indicator starts flashing red. Keeping track of fuel usage is a pain in the a** but critical to determining the health of your motorcycle. A drastic increase in fuel usage is usually the first signs something is going wrong or you need to switch your fuel retailer. Gasoline products are not created equal especially with the addition of ethanol. Filling up at the cheapest retailer may not be the best idea if your bike runs like crap or gets lower gas mileage. Paying a premium for fuel at a high dollar retailer may work against you as well. What works in your car may not work well in your bike. Also, keeping good records on the maintenance of your bike will also help when the time comes to sell or trade it in.
 

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I find the small fuel tank to be the biggest negative on the CTX700.

If I can't get my Trophy fixed or find something good to trade it for, I will have to add an aux tank to the CTX. I figure there's no sense in going for half measures, so I'll get the 8 gallon model. That'll give me a total of 11 gallons with an expected range of over 700 miles.
 

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An extra 8 gals adds roughly 75lbs. to your carrying weight, You may find yourself burning a lot more fuel to carry that extra fuel around. This will also change your center of gravity. I can only assume you plan to mount this tank on the back of the bike. As you consume fuel, the fuel will move or slosh inside the tank from side to side. This creates a bowling ball effect. Like throwing a bowling ball to one side or the other as your trying to perform maneuvers. Baffled tanks help but are not a cure all. This will be noticeable but not critical until you have to make a sudden movement. Every year fireman and big rig drivers die because of roll overs caused by this effect due to the amount of water or fuel they have to carry in half empty tanks.
 

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I find the small fuel tank to be the biggest negative on the CTX700.

If I can't get my Trophy fixed or find something good to trade it for, I will have to add an aux tank to the CTX. I figure there's no sense in going for half measures, so I'll get the 8 gallon model. That'll give me a total of 11 gallons with an expected range of over 700 miles.
I'd like to add range to my bike as well. However, even with a 700 mile tank, I only have about a 400 mile rear-end, at which point if I don't get off and walk a bit, I'll probably need some pretty embarrassing physical therapy. :p
 

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I would mount the aux tank over the passenger seat. I've seen an NC700X with a 200 pound passenger and a 200 pound driver. If they can keep an NC upright with 400 pounds of humanity on the seat, I don't think the weight of the gasoline will be a problem for me.

Aux tanks have baffles to keep the sloshing under control. The technology is well-developed over many years. I agree that it will affect the small CTX more than it would affect a Gold Wing. But it would be tolerable.

If I can get the Trophy running properly, this will all be a moot point anyway. When it runs, the Trophy gets close to 300 miles on a tank of gas.
 

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Latest MPG and fuel capacity experience

I took a picture of last fill up but lost the picture.

I am averaging 50MPG I think, because I am basically riding CTX700ND like a sportbike hard accelerating in Sport mode all the time.

I filled up two days ago, and I seriously put 3.15 gallons in the tank. Maybe it was 3.18 gallons. I had only gone 158 miles or 154 miles if I remember correctly.

I wish Honda would hollow out some plastic, and add another gallon. Better yet, make a 2015 CTX700 withOUT that silly glove box and add TWO GALLONS!!! Build it so we can buy the replacement OEM parts and swap out what we have. 3.1 gallons is a joke in motorcycle world. That's like an HD peanut tank!
 

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Honda is notorious for using parts from other existing bikes already in production. I'm sure if we look hard enough we will find this to be the case as well. There is certainly room for a larger tank although that would reduce the maximum carry capacity. No big deal for one up riders but might seriously effect two riding.
 

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Honda is notorious for using parts from other existing bikes already in production. I'm sure if we look hard enough we will find this to be the case as well. There is certainly room for a larger tank although that would reduce the maximum carry capacity. No big deal for one up riders but might seriously effect two riding.
Not sure I agree with you there on "seriously affect" ... how much weight would 2 gallons of fuel actually add to the bike? Almost exactly 13 lbs. The net difference is like the difference between having a 136lbs passenger instead of a 149lbs passenger.

The (lack of) fuel capacity on this bike is the only thing I am not thrilled with. I love my CTX but I agree that 3 gallons is a bit of a joke on a bike that wants to be a cruiser when it grows up.

P/
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Maybe it's because I ride much smaller displacement scoots all over the place, but I dont' find it to be that limiting.

On my 500cc Aprillia we got @ 45-50 riding hard from Denver to TX. There was ONE time where I was a little concerned about fuel, that's because I was in the BFE and didn't plan quite right. I ended up getting @ 120 miles between tanks on a 3.5 gallon, only 3.2 of which was usable if you didnt' want to mangle the fuel pump. It wasn't that big of a deal to stop every couple of hours for a stretch.
 

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i came from VTX1800C, which only got 33MPG whether I flogged it or road it like driving Ms Daisy. That bike only had a 4.5 gallon tank (approx), and I was lucky to see 135 mile range commuting. Gas tank was for looks on that bike. It did look nice, but everyone complained about small fuel capacity.

My last bike is important for my frame of mind (compared to coming from a scooter, which I have also onwned), because I am used to taking trips as well, and range can vary with CTX700. 3 gallons means I have to fill up twice a week because I ride hard commuting. In other words, I downsized (happily :) ).

Auxillary tanks are not the answer, IMHO. Only bike I saw that had a good auxillary tank possibilty was my old Suzuki Boulevard C90: G-Man (online) made a couple different size auxillary tanks for that bike that hid under engine next to the rear wheel- one tank was 2.5 gallons! You had to replace the stock exhaust to mount it (some ugly OEM black box was in that space), but many do that to upgrade breathing and sound anyway.

My CTX700ND is primarily for commuting I admit. Some of the other members have 2-3 bikes, and really the answer is NOT to try to make one bike do it all (IMHO).
 

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I'm 220Lbs and my passenger weighs in the ballpark of 150Lb. That's 370 lbs. Add in the weight of accessories such as brackets, carrier, bags and rear box. We are at maximum weight capacity as it is. That extra weight puts us over. I'm 53 years old so stopping every 2 hours is a God send. I ride with a small group on occasions and all have larger tanks. They get about 40-45mpg compared to my 60-65mpg. They have to stop as well to fuel up. I'm always hearing them complain about my little tank but the truth is once they are off the bikes, they moan and groan jus as loud as I do while going through their stretches. Darn that CTX and its little tank!
 

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AHEM. The voice of wisdom reminds me that 3 gallons IS enough. Stopping for gas also means potty, and a soda. And I know everyone at my local gas station by first name because I LIKE to go there and say hi (like Norm in Cheers).

Your right. I am going to Monterey for a 4 day/3 night ride in March. And I will stop every hour, and taking a break is important.

AND IF I RIDE LIKE NORMAL PEOPLE... I see 60MPG. I once saw 70 MPG and filled up out of fear I would run out of fuel. I approached 220 miles on that tank, putting along ENJOYING THE SCENERY. So yes, that little tank may just be a Godsend really.

Why am I complaining about averaging (potentially) TWICE the fuel economy of this bike which weighs HALF as much as my old VTX1800C?

Thanks for the healthier perspective JFC- your right :)
 
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I'm a daily rider / commuter, so I don't like stopping for fuel. It gets old on a regular basis, and my diesel car that I can vent fuel in to the tippy top has spoiled me, because I can go over 650 miles per tank with that puppy.

I feel pretty comfortable going another 10-15 miles after the flashing starts in the winter; maybe 20 in the summer. If I'm going up a hill when it first flashes, however, I think I've got a little more fuel than the .98 listed, because it will go back to 2 bars once I get back on flat road. Even though I like to get a lot of range, I don't like to push it. I don't think draining the tank real low is good for the bike, and it it ain't very good for my physhe either wandering whether or not I'm going to make it.
 

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Just be glad you didn't have a Honda CX 500 with the 2 1/2 gal (one hundred miles to walking) gas tank. A real pain when I was going to Las Vegas or Laughlin which were both over 300 miles especially when there were some long stretches without any stations. Three+ gallons & a better gas mileage should allow for at least two hours between stops which isn't too bad.
 
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