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The CTX is the first bike I have had with heated grips, and may I just say that it is money well spent. I got the factory heated grips and I got to use them for the first time. Wow...I cannot express how happy I am with my purchase.

Over the past few years I have been riding scooters, SYM HD200 for a few years (GREAT bike), Kymco People 150 (First scooter), and a Burgman 400 (GREAT bike too). Cold weather was a real problem when it came to cold hands. The Burgman was great at protecting against wind but my hands still froze.

I commute all year around and the only issue I really had was frozen fingers. No matter what kind of glove I used (I did not use heated gloves however), I could not make my short commute without having to slip my fingers out of the glove and fist up inside the glove at red lights. So for the first time I got to test out the heated grips, on the lowest setting...wonderful!

I want to say that it is cool having heated grips, but that sounds kind of silly:)

I am LOVING my CTX!
 

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how do you like the Honda grips? I've had Oxfords in the past, and picked up a set for the CTX. However it's not easy to find a place to put the controller that is out of the way. The integrated looks pretty nice, just not sure it's worth the $200 price premium.
 

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Like Jester I also enjoy the Honda heated grips. The amount of heat they can generate is amazing. The top setting is just too much, doubt I'll ever use that. The grips are comparable to the Harley grips I've had on other bikes. They extend my riding season, but I guess I'm just not man enough like Jest to go year round. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
love them

how do you like the Honda grips? I've had Oxfords in the past, and picked up a set for the CTX. However it's not easy to find a place to put the controller that is out of the way. The integrated looks pretty nice, just not sure it's worth the $200 price premium.
I do not have any experience with heated grips but so far I love them. Rode home in 38 degree wind and set the heat on the lowest level...no problem. I love having them.
 

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I use my heated grips often early and late in my riding season. They are real nice, and am glad I got them. Yet, on days cold enough to turn them on, on my naked CTX the tops of my hands still get cold. So, for me they sure do help, but still need to ride with a glove and liner set up.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just bought REV'IT! Hybrid WSP Gloves. I have not used them yet, I used my REV'IT H2O gloves, which are waterproof. My right fingertips got cold from the break handle, that is about it.

I will let you know how the new WSP gloves work but they are designed to stop wind chill. That in combination with the heated grips should do the trick. The only problem is that they are water resistant, not water proof. But I have the H20 gloves for rain anyway.

Specks on the WSP gloves:
Outer Shell: WINDSTOPPER Soft Shell 3L stretch, goatskin, connect finger tip fabric, tile grip, Chamude
Insulation: Tri-fleece liner

I will post my thoughts when I try them. Tomorrow is rain, so I will wear my H20s for now.


I use my heated grips often early and late in my riding season. They are real nice, and am glad I got them. Yet, on days cold enough to turn them on, on my naked CTX the tops of my hands still get cold. So, for me they sure do help, but still need to ride with a glove and liner set up.
 

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Good deal! I decided to return the Oxfords and go with the OEM grips. They are pricey but I found them for @ $180 shipped. This way I don't have to find a way to shoehorn the controller onto my bars, and I know for certain it's designed with my bike in mind.
 

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Does anyone know what dealers are charging to install the "factory" heated grips on a CTX? As a relatively new rider, I'm just starting to realize that gloves alone won't cut it for biting cold weather on long rides.
 

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I have the gerbing heated gloves if I need them, along with the jacket liner. Together they are a great combo.
 

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The OEM heated grips are worth every penny. I ride year round and many mornings it is in the upper 30's. I still have not had to use them on high and most often the low setting is just right. Once you have heater grips you wonder how you ever did without them. When I occasionally ride my wife Piaggio BV500 in the winter months I have to rely on my REI ski gloves that are rated to -5 degrees and by the time I arrive at work (22 miles with 70% at 60 mpg) my hands are cold. The heated grips, I wear unlined leather gloves.
 

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I can see how heated grips can do ok, but not great or good enuff for me anyway. In my experience, inside you hand and palms are enclosed and retain some heat naturaly. However, riding a motorcyle, the biggest issues are exposed areas and wind. The other problem is that hand blood flow is on the outside of the hand, not inside it. So, heating inside will only do some good. You can have it on high and burn your undersides of the hands, but your blood and topsides are still cold and dropping.

Riding in the cold with no heating, you don't want to loosen grip or remove your hands anyway. If you do it will be colder cause you just released any heat you had retained there.

What I propose for a much better solution is heated glove liners. If you get the right liners, they will provide heat around the fingers and ontop of the hands. This means the underside is still taken care of naturaly, the fingers are getting heat and most importantly ontop of the hand is being heated. Perks to switching is no big installs, grip clutter, you can move the hands off the grips and above all, they are universal to all electrical 12 volt DC sources!

Of course, another thing that is crucial is blocking wind if you can first for best results! Heated glove liners, good gloves ontop of them and inside a sealed set of muffs would be the ultimate heating effect for the hands. Unless you add heated grips also, but that would be redundant.
 

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I am not sure which way I would go with grips or glove heaters. I did find that on colder longer rides I set the Go Cruise 2 and then flex my throttle hand which helps, which I can do to the left hand as well! I use a full gauntlet glove, but they only help a bit. I did buy a pack of the small disposable hand warmers, but I haven't figured out how to keep them in my glove, so I bought a wool glove insert that helps. Oh well in another 3 weeks, it will be less of an issue, so maybe an upgrade over the summer! Right now I am waiting on my "GIPro" digital gear indicator!

Jimmy H.
AKA Spirit IV in the Gallery
and on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/user/JimConHam/videos
 

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I agree that heated gloves or glove liners would be the best option for all over warm hands. Just not the easiest to deal with. I have a heated vest and hate dealing with the cord and controller. Eventually, I'll get around to panel mounting the controller and just having a plug somewhere near the seat to plug the vest into. I definitely don't want to have to deal with the cords going to each of my hands, as well. I have heated grips on my atv and I can tell you that grips and gloves do a great job of keeping my hands warm, even though the back of the hands are not getting heat. There are even some gloves that are specifically made for riding with heated grips. They have less or even no insulation on the palms while the backs are insulated and wind proof. Taking into account the convenience of having everything mounted to the bike with nothing to plug and unplug each time you get on and off, heated grips are well worth the trade off of heated gloves.
 

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The gear indicator puzzles me since this bike already tells you what gear your in. :p
 

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The easiest thing Ive found is glance at the tach, keep the rpms between 2800 and 3000 rpm thru all 5 gears and then above 55 mph click all the way to 6th for overdrive! Works like a champ for me!
 

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Since I ride year round, rain or shine both hot and cold, I have yet to find a pair of cold weather gloves that will keep my hands warm at Interstate speeds or on longer rides ( 30+ min.) without some type of auxiliary heat. I've never been a fan of electrical heated gloves or gear since they tend to fail or run out of power (battery) at the worst time or put too much strain on the charging system. Heated grips do work fairly well with wind proof mittens but cannot be relied upon to keep the fingers warm even with heavy insulated gloves.


The best solution I've found is to mount some form of wind deflector to direct wind away from my hands and use chemical heat packs on the tops of my hands inside my winter gloves. I usually place the heated packs inside a thin glove liner to keep them secure and then put on my insulated gloves. For those times I cannot use a wind deflector, I prefer to use wind/water proof insulated mittens. Mittens help surround the fingers with warmth and take full advantage of body heat. They actually help to deflect cold wind away from the hands. There are even times I do not need to use auxiliary heat with mittens since they can get unbearably warm inside at slower speeds with the auxiliary heat.
 

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I found the heated grips to be wonderful in the early October mornings on my way back from California. I'd wake up to high 30s, low 40s at elevation in Nevada and North Rim of the Grand Canyon. After a few hours it would warm up enough to turn them of but if my finger tips got cold I could simply curl them to rest the top of the fingers on the heated grip (I use a GoCruise for touring as well). Obviously some ride conditions would make it inadvisable to curl your fingers resting on tops of the grips instead of gripping them but since there wasn't much traffic and the curves were big old sweepers for the most part doing so occasionally presented no problem. If I was going to be riding much longer at higher speed then I'd probably install the handlebar muffs I use on the scooters for winter riding. Those will keep the wind, snow, rain off quite nicely and work well even without heated grips. With heated grips you can wear summer weight gloves comfortably even in the 20s or lower. Though if I know it is going to sleet/snow I tend to take 4 wheels or stay home instead of 2 but I've been caught on both the Scooter Cannonball and my brother's 50th border to border ride on high mountain passes with little choice but to ride in pretty crappy conditions on several occasions. Ironically it was my brothers on the BMWs with heated grips and some with heated saddles who bitches about being cold in the snow over Mt. Shasta while I who didn't have muffs or headed handgrips (late May so I wasn't expecting snow, sigh so left them home riding the Aprilia Scarabeo before I got the CTX). Though that and Rabbit Ears Pass in Colorado are why I decide to get the heated grips on the CTX.
 

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I must be a warm person because I don't seem to need the heat. Similarly, heated car seats are extremely uncomfortable to me. In any case, the other members have already found the solution, block the wind and wear mittens rather than gloves. Actually, thin gloves inside of mittens are even better.

I spent an entire winter riding in the cold down to at least 10 degrees and never had cold hands following the aforementioned solution. Most days were around 15 degrees that year through the middle of the winter and I would average about 60+ miles per day, and 40 miles of those were on the Interstate.

This year, I rode in 20 degree weather, without the benefit of mittens or wind protection, and the back of my hands got too cold to be comfortable in a very short distance. I think Handlebar muffs are all that's really needed.

In any case, that's only my opinion. For people who don't like the cold, I would think heated grips along with something like handlebar muffs would be perfect, assuming you can reduce the amount of heat from the grips when needed.
 

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I booted the pooch on this one, every other bike I've owned came w/factory heated grips. I didn't even think about it until after the fact. At some point I'll likely have the factory units installed, they spoil you fast and you miss them even quicker when they aren't there.
 
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