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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got this bike, CTX700N, as a birthday gift from my better half and I have never even rode a moped before! So I'm looking for some good tips on riding a motorcycle. I have taken it out for short rides and I really like it but as a new rider I would love some tips from the seasoned pro's out there.
 

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I got this bike, CTX700N, as a birthday gift from my better half and I have never even rode a moped before! So I'm looking for some good tips on riding a motorcycle. I have taken it out for short rides and I really like it but as a new rider I would love some tips from the seasoned pro's out there.
Congrats but please take a rider safety course.
 

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pay the money and get help quickly or lean by staying off the roads and practicing in a big parking lot or grass field. At least in a field when you crash it wont hurt so much.

Not even a moped says lots that make most riders cringe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply's. I would love to take a safety course but with my schedule it isn't going to work. My husband has rode for over 30 years and has been taking me to parking lots and deserted places like that and teaching me the ropes. Hopefully I can find a safety course that can fit my schedule soon. Thanks again from Ohio!
 

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I've not yet been able to schedule the course, and it's been a year, but I've done lots of reading on their website and have spent a lot of time practicing skills like is recommended on their site.

I'm not stating that this is a substitute for taking the course, but at least one can do some things to improve one's thinking out on the road and improving one's skills until which time one can take the course by being proactive in learning what they teach in the course. I know that it's helped me a lot and helped me know what to look out for on the road and what situations to avoid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
gregsfc, I have read everything I can find on motorcycle safety and have practiced all of the skills they talk about. My husband tells me that I am doing a great job with it and has helped me learn the things that I have trouble with. Everyone that I ask that rides have been so helpful in giving me advice. Looking forward to riding more.
 

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Did you get your MC License? Not sure what the rules are in Ohio but in Wisconsin if you pass the MSF course all you need to do is take the written test to get it.

There are so many tips and your SO probably has done a good job but here are a few off of the top of my head.

Ride defensively and pretend that no one can see you.

Use your front brake a lot, most of your stopping power is the front. I can't tell you how many riders I see just using the rear brake when coming to a stop, well that's lazy and the first panic stop they need to make they'll probably (from training themselves) just jam on the rear brake and skid out. Practice panic stops in a large parking lot away from traffic.

Do most or all your braking before you lean for your turn. If you feel your too fast in a turn lightly bring in the rear.

Practice your balance in a large parking lot away from traffic by performing slaloms and figure eights (preferably around cones if you have them).
During figure 8's at low speed you can become smooth by dragging the rear and working the throttle to find that sweet spot. I used to practice this on my Goldwing and even on a big bike you can become pretty smooth in parking lots doing U turns.

I'm sure others can chime in with more....
 

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I think Brew hit the big one and that is to ride like you are invisible. Expect every car to turn in front of you or move over on you.

Horns are for honking at your neighbors so they can see you on your sweet new ride and not a defensive tool. Spend your efforts on a defensive move not trying to get some knucklehead wearing ear buds to hear your squeaky little horn.

You go where you're looking. If you are staring at what you want to avoid and not where you want to got you will hit what you don't want to hit.

Don't singularly focus on any threat. You must always keep scanning. You may be focused on the guy you think is going to turn left in front of you and miss the guy merging on top of you.

Don't drink and ride!! Not even a little bit.
 

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i'll join the chorus: TAKE THE MSF CLASS. otherwise, you're gonna put yourself and others at risk. even if your husband is a great coach, he can't prepare you as well as the msf course will.

that said, some tips not mentioned:

1. practice the heck out of tight turns from a stop.
2. practice starts and turns from uphill.
3. practice panic braking.

most important, BE SMOOTH. always favor SMOOTH. ride your own ride, and don't let traffic or even your husband push you outside your comfort zone when you're on the street for reals.
 

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oh, and some positivity, too: fear and trepidation is normal for success, and the joy will come as you slowly develop your abilities and master your fear -- and it's a rush! never entirely abandon the fear, though, as it will become a finely honed resource that will also protect you. the only route to mastering that fear is to RIDE and REFLECT.

aside: honestly, even with dct, i'm not sure the ctx700 is a total newb bike -- it's just heavy and cumbersome enough to discourage experimentation. see if you can get some time on a 250cc or even a scooter before you take up the ctx in earnest. you'll be able to treat your new baby so much better once you've made all your initial clumsy mistakes on a little "disposable" ride!
 

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Newriderohio. If you haven't already done so you should get a motorcycle permit,
Riding without one is a violation and as someone mentioned, if you complete a Motorcycle Safety Class you don't have to take a skills test.
Good luck riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I do have my permit. Just taking things slow for now practicing the figure 8's and turns along with quick stops and things like that. I'm hoping to find a safety course before summer is over. Thanks for all the tips, believe me I will use them.
 

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Have been blessed to have a motorcycle between my legs for 41 years. Self taught, lumps, bruises and all. Signed up for the advanced rider course in 2007 due to a friends persistent nagging. BEST THING i have ever done!
Novice or experienced rider, the benefits from a rider safety course are priceless.
One of the mistakes I see novice riders make (guilty of it myself in younger years) is to ride "like the other riders". You cannot make your riding decisions based on the folks you are riding with. Your field of vision is not the same as others in a group. Your reflexes are different. Your level of expertise is different.
Ride YOUR bike, using YOUR judgement. Be in control of YOUR space and let everyone else do what they may.
Happy Motoring
Johnny
 

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Oh and try to stay away from the middle of the lane especially when coming to a stop, that's where the cars and trucks like to drop oil and grease.

Someone mentioned scanning your eyes and part of that is paying attention to what's on the road like sand and gravel (especially in a turn) and other objects of destruction.

Tar snakes will upset the bike in a turn but don't panic your tires will grip again once they wiggle off of them..

There's more but I can't think as fast as I used to...:confused:
 

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I am from Ohio as well and I just took a rider safety course from the Iron Pony in Columbus last week.
https://www.ip-ra.com/index.php
They offer the course twice a month. They do the classroom part on Thursday evening from 6 to 10 pm and then they do the riding part on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. I am sooooooooooo glad I took the course.

I've been riding a Honda Ruckus on my permit all summer, but now that I've passed the Basic Rider Course, I have my license ("endorsement") and I'm looking to buy a "real" motorcycle. The CTX700ND is at the top of my list right now. Once I get my new bike, I'll be taking it back to the Iron Pony riding range (when they are not using it for a class) to practice and get the feel for my new wheels.

I strongly suggest that everyone take a course to become a better rider. I was amazed at how much I learned (and how fun it was).
 

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I've been driving for 43 year; not been riding near so long, but I noticed something new about driving alertly just about one year ago. It's something that helps me recognize possible hazards much better than before. I had already known about constantly scanning and moving one's eyes around, checking mirrors constantly, etc. to help one's brain and eyes work together making one a better driver and or rider. But about a year ago, I began moving my head around as well with short jerky motions. Not only scan with my eyes but also slightly move my head one direction, then the other; a little up; a little down; etc. Sort of like Arnold in the Terminator as a cyborg. It works for me. Helps me pick out hazards better and respond to them quicker.
 

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I'm still having trouble taking off on a hill using the rear brake (dumped my previous bike once while trying)...so if you can practice that one as well, the time spent would be well worth the effort!
 

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I'm still having trouble taking off on a hill using the rear brake (dumped my previous bike once while trying)...so if you can practice that one as well, the time spent would be well worth the effort!
another way to hold the bike on a hill is use 1 or 2 fingers on the front brake and the rest to turn the throttle some and keep both feet on the ground instead of one on the rear break. Give it some revs, let the clutch out (manual trans) and as it takes hold release the front brake then pick up both feet. Again this method takes practice to.
 
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