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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a while since I've posted, but I'm back for your good input.

I know comfort and confidence comes with experience, and I know I have to ride more for that to come. I'm still nervous about leaning my bike in sharper curves, and I slow down more than I have to in such curves. I understand that a little speed would actually add stability as I lean the bike through the curves, but I slow down anyways.

Among other things, Im thinking too much about leaning my body into the turn so that the bike has to lean less. When countersteering, does the rider automatically lean into the turn without thinking about it? If so, maybe I'm overthinking something I'm doing automatically. I really don't have any desire to lean into twisty curves so much that I have to scrape my pegs. I just want to be able to maintain a decent speed so that I don't have any traffic closing behind me in curves.
 

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this is a great question...

in my own opinions, this bike is harder for me to ride than my old buell was, however the buell can't lean over very far at all the pegs are mid and low. that bike fit me like a glove. the ctx, more like a prosthetic leg but my shortcomings are being addressed. and i too have the same nervousness as you.

comfort and confidence for sure, the more time you spend on the bike the better you will be. you could always find an empty parking lot in the late afternoon and practice some slow lean cornering... that has helped me alot when moving a little faster on the road. ive also found the more i lean the more the bike wants to turn, i saw in a bike site article to practice "kissing the mirror" and lean my body with the bike instead of trying to leave my upper half vertical. this has helped and ive been going at my own pace as i've been riding almost everyday. sometimes im not going fast enough and i have to straighten up a bit to continue the turn. it's all a learning "curve" :)

i don't even think about the countersteering part. i know the bike does it while i am leaning over on its own. this has to happen for the lean.




 

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IMO, you don't need to lean at all on the CTX if you are doing the posted speed limit. It is a very agile bike for a "cruiser". Counter steering does all the work.

A lot of people tend to turn in too early, which makes the corner seem tighter than it really is.

A great video:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks! The video is helpful. I feel better about entering corners a little slower and accelerating when I can see and manage the exit. The cagers that are behind me and not slowing just make me a little nervous. I guess countersteering, which I understand and have no problem doing, creates a little body lean automatically. I am probably overthinking. I just need to put some time in, gain the confidence and hone my skills.
 

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Also remember that whenever you are riding in an area where you are not familiar with the road it is wise to exercise additional caution.
 

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Riding at a speed that is uncomfortable is not enjoyable. Rding is supposed to be enjoyable, so ride at a speed that is comfortable. That includes corners.

My fear is always that there will be gravel, sand, mowed grass, even spilled corn during harvest time, in a curve. So I tend to go into curves slower than most.

Ride your ride. If traffic bunches up behind you, pull off and let them pass.
 

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IMO, you don't need to lean at all on the CTX if you are doing the posted speed limit. It is a very agile bike for a "cruiser". Counter steering does all the work.

A lot of people tend to turn in too early, which makes the corner seem tighter than it really is.

A great video:
As a noob (I have had a motorcycle for less than 6 months, and in the city too) this video was a huge help when I saw it.
 

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I remember reading years ago that in curves pretend you are a gyroscope and stay perpendicular with your bike. Start out slow and practice getting faster thru the curves. Worked for me.
 

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Great question. I live in south Florida and our only twisties we have are on and off ramps to the highway. I've taken 5 vacations to North Carolina and it takes me about 3 days before I start to get comfortable in the turns. I don't want to take the risk of having my bike sliding out from under me so I'll never try cornering fast but take it at a safe speed. To keep people from bunching up behind me I accelerate fast on the exit of the corner up to the next curve because I can accelerate faster than most cars. I like to keep the rubber side down and the shiny side up and my skin on my bones. Ride your own ride and stay safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I feel most uneasy when I can't see the exit of the turn. As soon as I can, I feel much better and can accelerate out of it. So far, I've seen convincing articles and videos advising riders to lean WITH the bike and others recommending leaning AGAINST the bike (counterLEANING). I need a drink. The best advice I've gotten is to just go only as fast as I'm comfortable goin as I enter the turn and to accelerate out of the turn.
 

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One of the best takeaways from the experienced rider course I took ages ago was to take advantage of target fixation: look where you want to go. I often point my nose to follow sharper curves. Whatever you do, don't fixate on the pavement a few feet in front of you.
Right On Vroomer!(y) Nothing quite like in person, professional MSF type training. Head and Eyes UP, TURN YOUR HEAD/Point your Nose, head/eyes level with horizon. You Will go where you look, so: Do Not "fixate" on any hazard ahead,o_O... LOOK to where you need to go.:p Intentional, additional countersteering may be needed at times, like in a blind decreasing radius corner or encountering an unexpected hazard. Where one looks, is always vital.
MCRider has many well done video lessons. Hope this helps.:)
 

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Yes, as 350 (a person with impeccable taste) pointed out, head level with horizon. That way, whether you are on your bike or in your car, you are aware of what the vehicle in front of the one in front of you is doing, as well as what's happening a half mile ahead. Do that and you'll never again be surprised by the sudden need to merge.
 

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I've been ridng for 55 years. I lean with the bike; no need to lean more in most street/road situations. Countersteering is your friend, and this bike is nimble enough that you shouldn't have to wrestle the bike. I make it a point to look as far into the curve as I can see: in tight curves, if the road seems to be moving closer from where you are pointed (and looking), you're in a decreasing radius turn and need to countersteer a bit more. I downshift as necessary coming up on the curve and use a small bit of trail braking (rear brake only).

The way to build confidence in curves is to do it more. Right now, we are in the Black Hills (western South Dakota) with some of the best riding roads in the country. I get plenty of practice while riding here. When we go back home to south coastal Texas, the roads are straight and flat... I really miss having these fun curves.

So, get out there and practice in the curves. Take it at whatever speed you are comfortable, then slowly build up from there. If traffic builds up behind you, pull over at the first safe spot and let them get around. It won't be long and you'll find the curves (the twistier the better) are the best part of riding.

Ride safe, have fun!

 

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It's been a while since I've posted, but I'm back for your good input.

I know comfort and confidence comes with experience, and I know I have to ride more for that to come. I'm still nervous about leaning my bike in sharper curves, and I slow down more than I have to in such curves. I understand that a little speed would actually add stability as I lean the bike through the curves, but I slow down anyways.

Among other things, Im thinking too much about leaning my body into the turn so that the bike has to lean less. When countersteering, does the rider automatically lean into the turn without thinking about it? If so, maybe I'm overthinking something I'm doing automatically. I really don't have any desire to lean into twisty curves so much that I have to scrape my pegs. I just want to be able to maintain a decent speed so that I don't have any traffic closing behind me in curves.
You don't need to lean in a turn you need to learn the "Roll and Press" technique which is taught in the motorcycle basic course and advanced riders course. It can save your life. Look up the Roll and Press technique on the internet and it explains it very clearly. After 15 MPH on a bike all turning is counter intuitive ...it's all physics. We don't lean at all. Our bikes do all the leaning.
 
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