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Discussion Starter #1
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I’ve got an unused rear Michelin Pilot Road 4 that has been stored indoors for it’s entire life (climate controlled).

It’s time for me to replace both of my tires. I always use Michelin tires. They are rather pricey and it seems a huge waste to just toss it. Manufacture date is 3716 (Sept 2016)

My dilemma is whether I should use it now or toss it. Maybe I can get 2 or 3 seasons out of it?

I’m not a very aggressive rider. I average maybe about 2000 miles a year. Some seasons much less…

The tire was purchased about 3 years ago. Looks absolutely perfect and upon very close inspection shows zero signs of dry rot. Has no cracks or imperfections of any sort.

Should I use it or loose it?
 

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I would use it. Lots of tires are on vehicles of all sorts for 10 years or better. Bought a set of tires in 2006 for my toyota x-runner. It was like a toy so nrver got a lot of miles on them. Sold the truck in 2013 but kept the tires and my son is running them on his ford ranger now. They still look like new other than the wear on the tread.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would use it. Lots of tires are on vehicles of all sorts for 10 years or better. Bought a set of tires in 2006 for my toyota x-runner. It was like a toy so nrver got a lot of miles on them. Sold the truck in 2013 but kept the tires and my son is running them on his ford ranger now. They still look like new other than the wear on the tread.
Thanks for the information! I’m leaning towards using it.
 

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howdy and use it
especially since as you say you don't ride high speed or aggressively. if you are bothered by it pay attention to situations that having it blow would be catastrophic and be even less aggressive there. that's how i roll.
ken
 

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If it has been stored as you stated, not exposed to UV, I would use it without question.
 

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It is OK to use. Rubber begins to oxidize and age starting from when it is removed from the mold. That's why Date Codes are required on all tires. A tire should be good for 8-9 years, after that it starts to become a risk failure. Storing in cool, dry, dark temps helps slow the process but it still ages. This is especially a problem for trailers which will age out tires long before the tread is gone. Had a buddy buy a horse trailer and 2 of the 4 completely blew on the 90 mile ride home. He called me over and I looked at the date codes and said "Damn, these tires are 17 years old, I'm surprised all 4 didn't blow." The trailer was 17 years old so these were the original tires.

Remember having one tire of four explode isn't quite the same problem as having one of two.


Steve
 

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Michelin tyres have great warranties between 5 and 6 years and I believe are of the same quality as Continental tyres that has more info on aging.
MICHELIN Two Wheel Tyres Warranty Guidelines
Continental says under “Aging of unused tires”.
Stored as recommended (e.g. in a cool, dry place not exposed to direct sunlight, chemicals, or other ozone effects), the tire will retain its balanced product profile for a long time.
Up to five years after its production date, a correctly stored, unused Continental tire can be sold and used unconditionally like a new tire.
The warranty period commences as or the motorcycle tires date of purchase and applies with no regard at all to the tires production date.
Continental recommends replacing all tires more than 10 years old - as per their stamped manufacturing date - with younger ones.
https://www.continental-tires.com/motorcycle/more-than-tires/faq
 

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Yes, use it. I think this jibberish going around about toss them after 5 years is tire company lawyer propaganda. Maybe yes to the 5-6 year thing if the tire sat outdoors, mounted on your bike for months at a time in the blazing sun or winter cold. As an aside, here is one for the "dealerships are out to sell stuff" files. A Canadian visitor that we ride with had a flat on his Harley and trailered it to the local Harley dealership to replace the tire. While they were at it, they replaced the other one and told him when he picked it up "if a cop stopped you with a 5 year old tire, you would get a ticket and your bike towed". Being Canadian, he was not sure of the AZ rules. NO such rule exists. One of our other riding friends is a Harley riding MSF instructor and he checked the AZ laws and verified no such law. Color both of them not happy with the Harley stealership.
 

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I would use it. I have read where they consider a motorcycle tire old at 5 yrs. Don't really know where they got this number.
 

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Yes, use it. I think this jibberish going around about toss them after 5 years is tire company lawyer propaganda. Maybe yes to the 5-6 year thing if the tire sat outdoors, mounted on your bike for months at a time in the blazing sun or winter cold. As an aside, here is one for the "dealerships are out to sell stuff" files. A Canadian visitor that we ride with had a flat on his Harley and trailered it to the local Harley dealership to replace the tire. While they were at it, they replaced the other one and told him when he picked it up "if a cop stopped you with a 5 year old tire, you would get a ticket and your bike towed". Being Canadian, he was not sure of the AZ rules. NO such rule exists. One of our other riding friends is a Harley riding MSF instructor and he checked the AZ laws and verified no such law. Color both of them not happy with the Harley stealership.
I would write to the owner of the dealership to explain what happened. I would also copy the CAA and AAA on the letter. Not as big a market as with cars, but they can be influential.. Explain what happened and ask the owner if he was aware of the practice. If not, give him a chance to check it out and try to make it right. If he was, or if he (or she) was behind the practice, I would share the story far and wide, including the name of the dealership and the owner.

As to the tire, it is well within the time frames and if stored as noted and no visible flaws, I 'd put it on and ride in peace.
 

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When out and around pay attention to all the old Harlies and what not that are driven by a lot of people. 10 to 20 year old bikes that are used only a thousand or two a year. I know a few of these guys and they never consider a tire change as long as there are no cracks in the sidewall. Look at the tires and not much wear on the tread and if allowed look at the date. You might be surprised how many old low mileage tires are out there.
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Should be fine for at least several more years, or until a T-CLOCKS shows bubbles or dry-rot.
I can't tell you how many times I've seen riders on the side of a busy super-highway watching a cop lean down a foot from the side-wall obviously looking for that small date-code.
 

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Check the date code. Just because you bought them a few years ago doesn’t mean they weren’t sitting around for years before that. As was said, once inflated look them over very carefully.
 

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I'd too would be tempted to use it but..... if it blows you are not likely to walk away. I just replace my 2014 tires that were on a garaged bike that only had 100 miles on them. The looked perfect but I just couldn't take the chance. I replaced them with Michelins because that's all I thought about when I rode - tires. I enjoy my ride more with the new tires. They are a little more "grippy" too.
 
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