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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay. I know that there have been a lot of reviews and most of them sort of cover the same things over and over, but the following link (review) has something new. They took the manual-shift, in basic stock form and hooked it up to a dyno tester.

2014 Honda CTX700 Road Test | Rider Magazine


Here is an excerpt which leaves me with a few questions from those who know a little more about MC performance...

...No DCT/ABS meant we could put the bike on the Jett Tuning rear-wheel dyno (the DCT requires the front wheel to be spinning before it will shift out of second gear), where it made the expected ho-hum 43.6 horsepower peak at 6,100 rpm (redline is at just 6,500 rpm), but impressed us all by churning out 41.9 lb-ft of torque, and a healthy spread of at least 40 lb-ft between 3,000 and 5,600.


So what I've read previously regarding the NC700S and NC700X, which should be exactly the same as the CTX models, is that the DCT produces approximately 48-49 horsepower, and the manual--about 50-52 depending on the source. I've read that peak torque is somewhere around 44 foot lbs, but I don't recall @ what RPM it peaks at, but what they've found seems about right.

Here is my point of confusion and where I hope that some members can straighten me out. Do motorcycle enthusiasts and/or manufacturers or testers treat motorcycle performance numbers the same as with cars? In other words, is there a rated horsepower and torque rating that is higher than the power and/or torque measured at the rear wheel? And is there a formula such as one see with cars where the approximate rated power can be calculated from dyno measurements and visa versa?

Or, is all of this different with motorcycles and that only the Dyno measurements matter?

If it is the former, then I would assume that, even though the reviewers weren't impressed, I am; especially with how flat and how high the torque number was on the test, and personally, I could care less about the peak hp as long as it is adequate for my purposes (which it seem to be). It seems also to me that, if this bike peaks in torque at the rear wheel at 42 and maintains at or around 40 from 3,000-5,600, that maybe it's rated torque number may be considerably higher.

Anyone that knows about these things, please feel free to elaborate!
 

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Engine Hp is always greater than rear-wheel Hp, not least because there are friction losses sending power through the tranny and maybe a little slippage of the tire on the rollers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Engine Hp is always greater than rear-wheel Hp, not least because there are friction losses sending power through the tranny and maybe a little slippage of the tire on the rollers.
Yeah I get that. What I don't know is that I thought maybe when they refer to power and torque ratings on bikes that they were referring only to rear wheel (actual) performance, even though I assume that it is probably the same as with cars, lawn mowers, etc.
 

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I have had my CTX700N for three months. I had the bags, backrest and rack mounted. Now I just put a Memphis Shades **** Cat windscreen on it and that works wonderful! I took a trip from central Illinois to western Tennesse and put 1500 miles on in 5 days. I love this bike, plenty of power through the hills of Kentucky and Tn. I also averaged 64 mpg. The bike has almost 6000 miles on it already and can't get enough of riding it!!!
 
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