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Discussion Starter #1
Okay folks. I'm getting ready to take a plunge into the heated-gear product territory. Lots of money and a little more complexity added to riding. I'd like to minimize as much as possible, each of those down sides, yet make sure I buy something that will cut the pain from my finger tips during the a.m part of my commute. After all, riding is supposed to be enjoyable.

I have no need or desire for heated suits, vests, etc, because my commute is not long enough for me to lose body heat, but something's got to be done about my finger tips below freezing, and I do want to ride below freezing as I've posted elsewhere. Often, the temp. rises to the 50s in TN even when it starts out @ 22, and I don't want to be in the cage on the way home.

Even though I've not tried and can't afford to try each heated option, I'm leaning towards battery-powered heated gloves and so far steering away from heated grips and wired-in gloves.

The following is at the top of my list and I'll probably order by tomorrow (Saturday) ahead of my planned Thanksgiving trip to Knoxville (101 miles).

Mobile Warming TX Glove 2012 - Lowest Price Guaranteed! FREE SHIPPING! www.motobuys.com


The linked product is $206 everywhere else, but is on sale at the linked store for at or about $189 with free shipping. If the product stops the pain in my finger tips below 32 degrees and is easy to manage (off, on, storing battery pack, charging, etc.), I will be completely happy.

Please give me your own biases before I spend a bunch of money for a pair of gloves.
 

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I've always found heated gloves to be far more effective than heated grips.

If you don't need a jacket, then the battery powered gloves look like a better option than running wires.

I'm not familiar with this brand. I've used Gerbing and Warm & Safe wired gloves and I love 'em. I have a Harley pair that were made by Gerbing. The advantage of buying Harley was that I was able to try them on in the store. I have always used a Heat Troller to control the temperature. The wired gloves work great with a wired jacket or liner.

I have a battery powered heated vest at work. It has worked very well for three years. It has three different heat levels. I've not noticed any dip in the ability of the batteries to last through the day.
 

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I have Raynaud's Syndrome whose symptoms are severe constriction of the blood vessels in the extremities. My fingers go ice cold if they get even a little damp or if I look at them cross-eyed. It's painful riding in 50 degree temps, and frostbite is a possibility if the ambient drops below freezing. I'm going to have to do something about it, but this caution in the TX glove description pretty much rules them out for me:

"CAUTION: Mobile Warming® apparel is not a replacement for protective riding gear and equipment."

Mittens, anyone?
 

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Get some gloves with "Outlast" technology. They keep your hands warm when it's cold and cool when it's hot.
 

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I have used Gerbing heated jacket liner for about 6 years and last year got the gloves. I can't ride in winter without the gloves because my left hand has ulnar nerve problems. They tend to be a little pricey but once you have them you'll never go back. Several of my long distance buddies use Warm and Safe and like them too.
 

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born2fly1948

I also ride year round, my record low 17 degrees F. I have mounted over the handlegrips four wheeler mittens, the type used by hunters. They have to be modified slightly by cutting a slit to allow the mittens to go on past the mirrows. I used them on my 900 Vulcan and now on my CTX. I had to modify the left one additionally. If I were installing a new set, rather than cut a slit for the mirrows I would now remove the mirrows and cut a hole in the mittens than reinstall the mirrows. I had an upholstery shop stitch the fabric to keep it from fraying. Inside the mittens a wear a good pair of ski type gloves. I mostly ride to run errands, mostly under ten miles, so I don't know how effective this would be on a longer trip. Less than $40.00 for this setup.
Tommy
 

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I got my first set of heated gear.

I have pretty good riding gear but at my age getting cold means more aches and pains. Brand was FirstGear (same as Warm and Safe ). For upper body a t-shirt, sweatshirt, liner and jacket just seemed too bulky and really not warm enough to ride all day.

I liked my winter gloves so got heated glove liners 72.00 (11 watts of heat)
I liked my leather jacket with liner so I got heated liner (don't use the original liner) 179.00 and 65 watts of heat (90 watt available)
I wanted a dual controller (control gloves separate one for liner) and I got wireless. fi
125.00 wired controller about 40.00 less and remains on the bike (fine if you have only 1 bike).

If I find my lower body needs heat, I will buy pant liner 179.00 I think but for now I am ok.

first step was to mount the permanent pigtail on the bike. I simply hooked the fused harness directly to the battery and tie wrapped it in place. I have about 10 inches of pigtail in reach. The part is 10.00 so if you have more than 1 bike you can do the same on it.

next where to put the dual controller. I put Velcro tape on the back of the controller and it sets on top of the master cylinder reservoir. Easy to remove and put in my pocket.


what I found out after 400 miles. I will not ride without it under 55 degrees.

It takes a little longer to get going. The pigtails in the liner hide in zippered pockets if you just use it as a liner. so you have to make sure the main pigtail in is hanging down from the liner on the left side. If I plan to use the glove liners, each sleeve has a pocket with a pigtail for the gloves.

My go riding routine is typically this,
Roll bike out of garage after checking it over.
Put on leather overpants (already wearing t-shirt, jeans, tall sockes & boots on)
Insert ear plugs and ski mask then Modular helmet with chin flipped up
put on liner with pigtails deployed
put on my regular leather jacket (without it's liner)
put on glove liners and hook up pigtails
sit on bike and start it so it can warm up some
Plug the liner pigtail into the bike pigtail (liner automatically goes 1/3 on)
Zip up liner, pockets, and jacket.
put gauntlet gloves on over glove liners.
reach up and turn control knobs on heat controller to 1/4 power. (never been over 1/2 )
pull down helmet chin, lock in place
Ride off. Adjust heat as needed.

Love it.

Now that my CTX and FZ-09 are wired with harness my routine is the same on either bike.

Granted this is more money than battery powered gloves that GREGFC was referring to and though quiet expensive for gloves they may be the best price to get warm hands.

The way I went used my existing riding gear was my choice. I could have gotten new heated gloves and jacket and controller but would have cost more. Liners not cheap by any means, but neither is the CTX or your body. Quality of the products and warranty is good.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the feedback everyone. This gives me a lot to look at and consider...

Hey! I just went to Webbikeworld and see that they've recently done a whole new slew of reviews on battery-powered heated gear that wasn't there a week ago. They've even got a slightly upgraded version reviewed of the glove that was at the top of my list. The Mobile Warming LTD Max @ $269.

I'll be looking once again at the Gerbrig Hybrid Heated Glove, but the issue with Gerbrig is that you have to add battery power to the base price of the glove, which is already about the price of the other brands but is set up for only 12 volt operation (converting to battery power is extra $$$). I think we get into about the $350 territory if one uses the Gerbrig.

I'll be looking again at the VQuattro Squadra, which had previously won a review at Webbikeworld when it was just them against the Gerbing Hybrid. The issue with them is that you have to order from a British website and pay international shipping, and it has a couple of luke-warm consumer reviews, even though it performed very well in the Webbikeworld review.

There is additionally a Volt Titan glove to look at that I didn't know about.
 

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Gregfsc, I believe the Volt Titan was rated by Webbikeworld as the warmest with the best battery power. Also, I believe that the Volt Titan warms on both sides of the hand and not just the tops. Unfortunately I can't find a review by anyone who has actually owned the Volt Titan. Please keep us posted after you have owned a pair of battery gloves as to how they perform. I am considering this option as well. thanks!
 

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As Bill stated I also use the plug in setup. I use Gerbings, have for many years. I use the jacket liner with the new micro wire which has small zippers in each sleeve for gloves to plug in. Great service and reliable. I also have the outer wear pants and they are amazing. One cable to the battery and an easy one plug in. I also use a dual controller but use the pouch with a belt clip. In addition the cable from the battery can be used for a tender. Mike Vlahos is a superior dealer with unbeatable service. If you deal with him tell him TJ from Virginia Beach referred you.
http://www.heatedclothing4u.com

Gerbings also has a nice panel mount kit for an extra clean install so no cable is hanging out visible.

He also sells battery powered Gerbings gloves. Mike stands behind his product and I have learned with age that service means more than the bottom line.
 

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I just went down this road myself purchasing a pair of battery powered heated glove liners (Venture). I also have a very short commute (7 miles mostly under 40 mph) but when it's cold out, it doesn't take very long for me to loose the feeling in my fingertips. Last year I purchased a set of National Cycle hand deflectors for my Magna and they certainly helped a little but my fingers were still pretty numb by the time I made it to the office when temperatures were down near or below freezing. The Ventures works very well under my Gore Tex gauntlets ... so well, in fact, that now I'm starting to notice the cold elsewhere (feet and lower legs). They do add a bit of bulk to the gloves but I've gotten pretty used to it already and don't seem to have any trouble working the controls. I just have to remember to keep them charged ... I was riding to work one morning last week and started to feel my fingers getting cold only to find that the liners had run out of charge when I pulled my gloves off when I reached my office.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I've taken a risky plunge and bought Warmthru G5 Fingerheater directly through their website in the U.K. No webbikeworld.com review on this particular glove but one on their previous edition, which was a G4 Fingerheater, it was rated number 1 at the time. The best thing about this Scottish brand is that it has a real gauntlet like regular winter gloves, instead of those tight gauntlets found in the other brands that won't fit over winter jackets or suits with the batteries installed.

This glove was on sell from Amazon @ $295 + shipping. I went to their website and got it for $206 including almost $70 shipping. I wander though; will there be a custom's charge? I've never bought internationally.

It came down to three choices for me: The Volt titan that does not have a loose gauntlet to give room for the batteries and to simultaneously go over my suit but has good reviews, the Gerbing heated glove liner (I would have continued to use my current winter gloves over these liners and maybe upgraded to better winter gloves next year). And this Warmthru G5 Fingerheater. Something that worries me a little is that if I need to upgrade to bigger batteries and charger, will it cost a fortune getting it shipped from Scotland? The Gerbing Hybrid was just a little steep in price and was really the only reason I didn't opt for it. Hopefully, I won't regret not buying Gerbing.

I looked at the Venture Heat liner real hard, but some of the reviews scared me. Some stated that they felt no warmth although this is not the experience of LIRider.

I'll give feedback when I get it.

Thanks for everyone's help.
 

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I looked at the Venture Heat liner real hard, but some of the reviews scared me. Some stated that they felt no warmth although this is not the experience of LIRider.

I'll give feedback when I get it.

Thanks for everyone's help.
I can't say my fingers feel hot or even warm with the liners on (at least not while riding, trying them out inside you clearly feel the warmth) but I can say unequivocally that they don't feel cold at all, not even a little bit. They feel comfortable. I actually thought perhaps they weren't working well or that it was simply the fact that I had an additional liner on under my regular winter riding gloves until that one ride last week when they actually ran out of charge and I indeed felt cold again.

That said, I look forward to your review when the new gloves show up.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I can't say my fingers feel hot or even warm with the liners on (at least not while riding, trying them out inside you clearly feel the warmth) but I can say unequivocally that they don't feel cold at all, not even a little bit. They feel comfortable. I actually thought perhaps they weren't working well or that it was simply the fact that I had an additional liner on under my regular winter riding gloves until that one ride last week when they actually ran out of charge and I indeed felt cold again.

That said, I look forward to your review when the new gloves show up.
Yeah I'm not getting this "feeling warmth" thing that keeps coming up in professional and consumer reviews, and I think it has only worked to confuse me in my search for something that will work as inexpensively as possible. I'm not sure what folks are expecting or wanting out of a heated glove. I'm after something that will keep my fingers from going numb and/or hurting from the cold; not something that's going to feel good, as in better than normal. Alot of the reviews state that this or that glove is good down to 50 degrees or so. Well I just went riding today with my unheated gloves in 42 degree weather and did not get cold fingers and would not even want heated gloves for that situation, because it's just another hassle and another step to ride. I don't understand (I mean I guess I do understand people have different tolerance levels), but I don't quite get why they are reviewing heated gloves for temps above 40 degrees and stating that a certain heated glove is good down to only 40 or 50 degrees. Such a review is useless to me. I don't understand what they are trying to measure if they're talking about a temperature that is not even worthy of heated gear for my personal tolerance level.

I've got this theory that if I went out and got some better winter gloves, i.e. Revit Alaskas and had some battery powered liners, I'd be set for just about anything as long as the batteries in the cuff didn't get in the way of downing and wearing the gloves over the top of the liners. Then I could use the same gloves all winter and just use the liners when I need them. And also, by going this route, I know I would have an outer glove wherein I could put the gauntlet around the outside of my suit, which is greatly preferred. Most of the heated gloves don't allow for this, and that's one of the reasons I went with this Scottish-made glove. When I saw some negative stuff on the Venture Heat gloves and liners, I then looked at Gerbing liners, which were only $20 more than the Venture Heat liners, but I was afraid that my gloves would not be insulated enough for the liners to do their job, and I can't afford to get better gloves and liners, so I finally just picked out a pair of heated gloves that had the big gauntlets like a regular winter glove. There were only three that I found: Venture Heat and Warmthru G5 and Warmthru G6. G6s are water proof and G5 is water resistant. Since I need these gloves for temps @ or about freezing temps, I wasn't worried about them being water proof, and it saves about $35 going with water resistant.

I run in to this problem time and time again regarding riding gear. I can't find an easy way to learn about products and what level they are designed to perform other than just to keep trying different ones. Price is often an indicator but not always. It seems like the manufacturers and retailers would put products like winter gloves in categories by need.
 

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Find a pair of gloves with "Outlast" technology, that stuff works great. I have the one piece base layer underwear suit and it works like a charm. In the summer it's supposed to keep you as your body temperature rises. In the winter, it does the opposite. I haven't tested in the summer yet since I just got mine, but it does work to keep me warm when riding in cold weather.
 

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It may be too late for the original poster, but I'll add my two cents worth for anyone else considering this.

For years, I went the unheated route. I managed to make it comfortably down to 16F for my hour long commute, but it always took some planning to make sure I had the right combination of gloves and liners. Last year, I took the plunge and bought some Gerbing T5 gloves. I've had them now for a year, and my only complaint is that I didn't do this sooner.

My Gerbing T5 gloves finally bit the dust a week ago after a year of hard use. So while I could get them fixed for the cost of postage by Gerbing, I decided to look for a "backup" set while they were gone. I should add that I commute year around about an hour each way. The temps are often in the mid to high 30s...and many times below freezing into the 20s. When your commute is 15-20 minutes, you'll find your hands might be getting chilled...but by then you're at your destination. It's not a big deal. But when you commute for longer than that, you need something to allow you to ride comfortably.

Some thoughts for anyone considering this. First, your blood vessels for your hand are on the back of the hand, not the palm. That's why heated gloves generally work better for many people than heated grips. The back of the hand is still exposed to cold air unless you have winter gloves with more insulation in the back of the hand than the palm. The Olympia Cold Throttle glove is like that.

When you're considering heated gloves, look to see where the heating elements are. I tried on some Gerbing G3s and could easily feel the heat in the palm and back of the hand. I almost bought some Firstgear gloves because they were much cheaper...but they only heat the back of the hand. I ride with my fingers covering the clutch and brake levers. That would put the underside of my hand out in the cold, and I could see the Firstgear gloves not working for my needs.

Also, look at the warranty. As I got to checking on glove reviews by users, it appeared common that they would fail as mine did...after about a year. Gerbing stood out to me for the lifetime warranty they have on the wiring. Others are good only for a year or two. That can be a false economy if you end up buying new gloves every couple years.

If you go to the wired type of glove, I recommend buying the dual controller...even if you don't plan to ever buy anything additional. I bought the single controller last year with the gloves and thought that would be the only heated gear I'd want...and this year added the heated jacket liner...and had to buy the dual controller. I could've saved some money, if I'd followed the recommendation of others to buy the dual controller.

I can't tell you what other gloves are like, but I do like the Gerbing T5. Temps this time of the year might start at 32F and climb to 49F by the afternoon commute home. Unlike my non-heated Olympia Cold Throttle gloves, the Gerbing T5s breathe so they work even in the warmer temps when my hands would sweat in the Olympia gloves. They are also waterproof, which is good if you ride in rain as I do.

And the nice part about heated gear is you can adjust it on the fly. I'll often change the temperature during the ride, depending on if I'm sitting at traffic lights with no air moving over me, or moving along on the freeway.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #17
To Chris...

Thanks for sharing your experiences.

I agree that something more had to be done if I were going to enjoy commuting at least some in the winter, late fall, and early spring months. There is just too much afternoon nice rides that will be missed if I decided to skip all a.m. commutes below 35 degrees, which is about my tolerance level with my current, unheated gloves (but every other part of my body is absolutely comfortable, even down to 24). The only thing I have to solve then is keeping my fingers from feeling pain and numbness and then I can extend my season.


These Warmthru G5 Fingerheaters I just ordered uses dual batteries in each glove; one for the tops of the hands and tops of the fingers; and one for the palm and bottom of the fingers, four 3.7 Volt batteries and a charger. But one can upgrade to one set of 7.4 Volt batteries and charger for the bottom (deluxe package), and that package has both a 7.4volt and charger and a 3.4 set and charger. So in the deluxe one can really use the more powerful batteries in either position. Or, one can upgrade to the Ultimate package and get the 7.4 volt top and bottom and a charger for each set. The price goes up considerably for each upgrade and on the American Amazon site, the ultimate package is nearly $400; the standard package is around $300; and the deluxe is around $375 (if I remember correctly), and these gloves have a burn warning right there on the main caption. Also Warmthru sells an armband and extension wire set for either size battery as an accessory, which I wanted but the price is a little steep since one has to buy both the arm band and the extension wires. If I get the my standard package and can figure out a cheaper arm band solution, then I'll just order the extension wires for $18 and get all that weight off my cuff and put it just beyond my elbows.

I read one review from someone who works in -45 temps who had bought the Ultimate G5 and he stated that he could not feel cold hands or fingers even at 45 below F for up to 3 hrs. But there are no reviews for the standard package or deluxe package that I can find, even on the British Amazon site. The good thing about this whole thing is that the upgraded batteries and chargers are available at the U.S. Amazon site, and the price is not too unreasonable; maybe $50 for a 7.4volt set, so if I find that I'm still getting numbness and/or pain, I can upgrade again, and what I have now won't really be wasted; I'll just have an extra set of 3.4 volt batteries.

There are also Warmthru Fingerheater G6 gloves, which are exactly the same except they are waterproof and about $35 more.

Of course I can't recommend anything from Warmthru at this point but everything looks really good so far except the price, and the very positive Webbike review is encouraging as well.

I ordered directly from the British Warmthru website as linked below and for some reason when I went to the check out page, they lowered the price from 95 British pounds to 79 British pounds, which lowered the price a little from what I thought I would be paying, however, the shipping charge was 48 pounds. And then later, I read something about a possible customs charge, so I guess I didn't fully research and may get an unexpected charge to my credit card in a few days.

WATER-RESISTANT G5 Super Hot, Hyper Comfort, Carbon Fibre Fingerheaters
 

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There are so many choices as you're finding, and a number of additional costs that you don't see up front as you're finding out. (I just noticed the 17.5% VAT if you buy directly from them.)

Another cost you may not have considered, is what about a backup pair? In other words, when your heated gloves eventually fail, what will you use while they are getting repaired...assuming the warranty still exists on them.

I did a quick look through the Warmthru website and didn't see any mention of a warranty, just a 7 day return policy. I would want to see something before plunking several hundred dollars down on a product that has a potential for failure. (Not just Warmthru products, but any heated gloves.)

I noticed a USA distributor just now and they do have a warranty. For 9 months. That's poor.

A couple other things I noticed.

  1. They aren't made for motorcycling. webBikeWorld lists that among their uses, but the Warmthru people don't on their website. The gloves are made for "hillwalkers, yachtpersons, outdoor sports enthusiasts, sport fans, hunters, photographers...the list is endless" but the list doesn't include any use with the potential for abrading the gloves on pavement. I figure that riding when it is cold outside, has more potential for an accident than during the summer. So if I feel it important to have good motorcycling gloves on in the summer...why wouldn't I want that in the winter? I value my hands. ;) Note - they do say on the home page that Warmthru heated clothing is made for motorcyclists...but they are talking there about the other products, not gloves.
  2. They do have motorcycling gloves...but they aren't heated.
  3. The pair you reference are only water resistant. They aren't water proof. There's another pair that are water proof. I commute in Seattle where we get a lot of days of rain. Not heavy rain, but enough to soak you through easily. As one rider put it on a forum, if you don't ride in rain, you don't ride in Seattle. I thought her comment was wonderful and so true. The heated gloves will potentially open your thoughts up to more than just commuting, and to an afternoon ride somewhere. If you get caught in a shower, you'll want gloves that are waterproof.
  4. webBikeWorld has user comments at the bottom of their reviews. These are generally made by actual owners of the product. There's one at the bottom of the Warmthru review. M.D.'s comments would be enough to have me looking elsewhere.
  5. webBikeWorld reviewed the G4 glove. It is waterproof. The glove you linked to is the G5, which is not waterproof.
Like you, I didn't like the idea of being tethered to my bike with a bunch of wires. It took me a bit to work out a way to run the cables through my jacket for my gloves last year, but once I did, it became a minor issue. Just the joy of having warm hands made up for any inconvenience of the cables. It's like putting on all the riding gear before leaving. It's an inconvenience, but once I got over it mentally, it wasn't a big deal.

I'm hoping I don't come across overly negative. I'm trying only to look at this as a potential purchase and point out things you may not have seen or considered. Sometimes it helps to have more than one set of eyes look at something.

Chris
 

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Yeah I'm not getting this "feeling warmth" thing that keeps coming up in professional and consumer reviews, and I think it has only worked to confuse me in my search for something that will work as inexpensively as possible. I'm not sure what folks are expecting or wanting out of a heated glove. I'm after something that will keep my fingers from going numb and/or hurting from the cold; not something that's going to feel good, as in better than normal. Alot of the reviews state that this or that glove is good down to 50 degrees or so. Well I just went riding today with my unheated gloves in 42 degree weather and did not get cold fingers and would not even want heated gloves for that situation, because it's just another hassle and another step to ride. I don't understand (I mean I guess I do understand people have different tolerance levels), but I don't quite get why they are reviewing heated gloves for temps above 40 degrees and stating that a certain heated glove is good down to only 40 or 50 degrees. Such a review is useless to me. I don't understand what they are trying to measure if they're talking about a temperature that is not even worthy of heated gear for my personal tolerance level.
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I completely agree. At 50 degrees, I can ride in my standard leather riding gloves without much trouble. In the 40's, my winter riding gloves (Cortech Scarab's) alone keep me toasty enough. 30's or 20's is where I start to really feel the cold and adding the battery powered liners has made a very big difference there. Generally, I won't ride if it's not going to get up into at least the upper 30's by the time I leave work or if the weather is expected to be not so nice. I've got a very nice cage for use in those conditions :). I also agree with the other comments here that longer distances would mean re-evaluating my choices but for my daily commute of under 20 miles r/t, the heated liners are all I really need.
 

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Here's another option to perhaps consider while you wait to see what heated gloves work for you, and what ones to avoid. Personally, I hate feeling like I'm pushed into making a purchase and would rather research it fully before spending my hard earned cash.

As both of you have written, 50F is no big deal. I've got the Cortech Scarab gloves too. They work well. I prefer the Olympia Cold Throttle gloves, but only a bit more.

A thin glove liner inside will get me down to around 40F and a bit lower. I use an REI glove liner. There's nothing fancy about it, but it does add an extra layer of insulating warmth.

When the temperature gets down to the mid-30s and below, I'll change liners to the Seirus Thermalux Heat Pocket gloves. The idea of these is there is a pocket on the back of the hand that will hold one of the chemical heat packs. (Costco sells a large box of these cheap.) The liners have metallic threads woven into them that help to transfer the heat through the hand. Supposedly. ;) I'm not sure that actually happens, which might be why the new version of the liners has left out the metallic thread, which has a tendency to snag on Velcro. But the idea is good and the heat packs really help.



One other thing that really helps, is to buy some handlebar muffs. You can find some inexpensive muffs by including ATV muffs in your search. Two things to think about on those. First, do your best to block any entrance to air coming into the muffs. You want the air inside to be as still as possible to lessen the wind chill. Second, you might have to fashion some kind of "brace" to hold them away from the brake and clutch levers. The force of the air moving over them at speed is enough on mine to move the brake lever back just a bit. I don't know if the brake light actually lights at that point, or if the brakes rub with that little bit of movement, but I made "L" shaped brackets to avoid it. The brackets were just scrap pieces of metal that I attached to the handlebar weight screw and had them go forward to extend past the levers. It was simple, but worked.

Those muffs will keep your hands warm and dry in most riding conditions. I used them and the Seirus glove liners down to 16F on some commutes for an hour each way. And my hands were warm.

And in the meantime, you can wait while the manufacturers come out with better ideas on how to make battery powered heated gloves work better.

Chris
 
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