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Discussion Starter #1
re: Friction Zone

Most of the techniques people practice involve finding the friction zone --- how do you find it on a clutchless motorcycle?
 

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It's a very different concept. You can learn to feather the throttle a bit as you start off. But once you're moving, you really have no control over the smoothness of the shift.

I've been riding my CTX700D on some slick surfaces this winter and it's been a challenge to keep from spinning the rear wheel at times. Downshifts are the scariest. They can be very abrupt and lead to a slide on fresh snow that would not be a problem with a regular bike.
 

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A viable option instead of using your clutch's friction zone, is to use your rear brake. If you drag your rear brake slightly and use your throttle to pull against the drag of the brake, it will have the same effect. Of course I personally don't know if the brakes are linked on the DCT models, as I don't own a CTX700 yet. I am planning on selling my 2009 VTX1300R soon, then paying whatever difference there will be.
 

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I wouldn't recommend dragging the rear brake at all. Unnecessary wear; engaging the ABS (possibly) at a rolling speed; just two at the top of my head. If I am off base, apologies beforehand.

The whole benefit of the DCT [and ABS] is that all those engineers at Honda put tons of expertise into the build. Why thwart it? The kit costs a buck or two, for a reason...

To the OP: just learn to barely roll the throttle; your eye/brain/muscle memory will soon have you doing things naturally and smoothly.

My $0.02

Ride Safe, Ride Often
f
 

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I wouldn't recommend dragging the rear brake at all. Unnecessary wear; f
Dragging the rear brake ( along with staying in the friction zone) is the recommended method of slowly making tight u-turns on a motorcycle.
Don't know about the technique for scooters.
You'd have to make one **** of a turn to "unnecessarily" wear the rear brake.
Especially for those who think the rear brake isn't strong enough.
 

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Dragging the rear brake ( along with staying in the friction zone) is the recommended method of slowly making tight u-turns on a motorcycle.
Don't know about the technique for scooters.
You'd have to make one **** of a turn to "unnecessarily" wear the rear brake.
Especially for those who think the rear brake isn't strong enough.
My comment was in the context if the OP, not for NOT EVER using the rear brake. OP wants to find the friction point on a DCT. Another poster said to drag the rear brake hence my comment.

I know how to use the rear brake, friend. Looks to me like you have this screaming need to jump in and be right...

Pet the cat.

f
 

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I know how to use the rear brake, friend. Looks to me like you have this screaming need to jump in and be right...

Pet the cat.

f
Sensitive, aren't we.....friend.
I don't like cats.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Let me rephrase my original question slightly. I've been told that when one is cornering or making a u-turn at a slow speed, keeping a bike on the friction zone will prevent the bike from falling. On the ctx700, how much throttle should I apply so I can corner or u-turn properly without risking dropping the bike? It's especially tough for me when I have my wife on board and I'm trying to make a turn at less than 12 mph. Any help would be appreciated since apparently there is no such thing as friction zone on the ctx700
 

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Let me rephrase my original question slightly. I've been told that when one is cornering or making a u-turn at a slow speed, keeping a bike on the friction zone will prevent the bike from falling. On the ctx700, how much throttle should I apply so I can corner or u-turn properly without risking dropping the bike? It's especially tough for me when I have my wife on board and I'm trying to make a turn at less than 12 mph. Any help would be appreciated since apparently there is no such thing as friction zone on the ctx700
You will be happily surprised at how this bike downshifts automatically, so, in turns, it seems to always be in just the right gear to apply throttle thru the turn. My wife and I are two up on it all the time. Its a breeze. We can turn easily at the lowest speeds, in turns, you name it. It's low center of gravity and how it selects gears make it a lovely two-up ride.

Ride Often, Ride Safe
f
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Effem Tee,
Thank you for your input. One last bit of advice: when you make a u-turn how much should you turn the handlebars? I know that handlebars should not be turned when going more than 8-10 mph because of counter steering but what about < 10 mph?
 

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how much throttle should I apply so I can corner or u-turn properly without risking dropping the bike? It's especially tough for me when I have my wife on board
Follow the example set by ex-World Champion Wayne Gardener. Practice till you fall off, then back-off a tad for the real thing. If the real thing involves someone you love, and you still want to find your limit, then you're on your own.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Old Tom,
You're advice is cryptic. I don't have time to practice till I fall off. I'm just trying to understand the mechanics of turning. No time to follow any world renown biker that I've never heard of
 

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I think Old Tom is trying to tell you going slow is easy and like any bike with or without a clutch the throttle and balance is everything and comes with practice. The CTX has very wide bars a low center of gravity. This makes it very easy to maneuver at slow speed. Once you get one, just a few practice turns will tell you what I mean. Now ad a 2nd person (wife or someone else you love) and you should feel a lot of difference and again an emply lot an a little practice will make you both feel better. Happy and safe riding.
 

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fundean,

If you have an opportunity, sign up for a MSF safety class. You will get the basics, you will learn low speed maneuvering, and will be a much safer rider. I took the class even though I've been riding scooters. They used Honda Rebel cycles. My only difficulty at first was remembering to use the clutch at times since I was used to twist and go. The clutch on the cycle we used is my rear brake lever on the scooter. After about an hour of riding I pretty much got used to things. Concepts like looking into your turns at low speed are much more important. I spent a lot of time afterwards up in the school parking lot on weekends using parking lot parking spaces with my scooter in refining my turning skills at low speed.

The class got me a discount on my insurance and allowed me to waive the driving portion of my test in getting my "M" endorsement on my drivers license in Missouri.

Jack
 

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Excellent advice! Its mandatory in Texas. The CTX700 DCT is a breeze at slow speed maneuvering one or two up. You would be a fool not to take the bike out and do some slow speed maneuvering to see how it reacts to your inputs after buying the bike. An empty parking lot is the best place. Same with riding with a passenger. I recommend getting to know your bike for at least a month or so before thinking about placing a passenger on the back. Then its slow and steady for a few rides to get used to having the additional weight and change in the center of gravity to get used to. Your passenger needs to get accustomed to riding on the bike as well. Their inputs also play a big role in how the bike will handle. Especially a novice passenger rider. They tend to not want to lean into corners or curves but remain sitting straight up. This can be disastrous causing you to over correct or just plain missing a corner or curve. They need time to get used to riding as much as you do.
As far as the friction zone is concerned, there really isn't much of one to deal with. There's no clutch to deal with so no friction zone to worry about. Like your automatic car, the DCT reacts to throttle input. Small amount of throttle makes the bike go slow. More throttle makes the bike go fast. The rear brake will give you the necessary control if the need arises or keep you in place on slopes or hills.
 
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