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u da man !
 
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I am searching for a different exhaust myself. The Danmoto GP Carbon looks good to me.
But I don't want loud, just a mellow deeper tone.
I do wonder about changing the exhaust and loosing backpressure.
Other fuel injected bikes I'm familiar with require remapping of the electronic brain when that is done. Also, remapping is needed when going to a free flow intake combined with a free flowing exhaust. Often, using aftermarket tuning add-ons such as a Power Commander or others that change fuel flow and spark are needed to get optimum performance after the changes. Many bikes (Triumph twins with EFI for one) have dozens of maps for retuning. In fact, Triumph itself offers new maps after only an exhaust change. A remap after install of their TORS exhaust is required by Triumph. I put those pipes on a Triumph America and there was a noticeable loss of performance until the remap was done by the dealer.
If the CTX electronic engine controls do sense changes and correct for them, we are indeed fortunate.
I would be interested to see dyno results after only losing the muffler or going to one with very little restriction. Sometimes the loud factor masks the loss of low end torque.
It could be that pipe removal does not alter the back pressure-if so we would be good to go.
At any rate, I'll follow this to gain more info before I make any changes.
 
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ofdave,

You just answered your own answer. Those bikes required mapping, cause they are mapped! The first edition of motorcycle fuel injection was based on a mapped program, meaning it added the mapped amount of fuel upon an rpm range. Bad news about that system is that it has alot of variance with just a slightly dirty air filter, weather etc.

The new and more modern fuel injection is just like a modern car and eventualy all bikes will go this route too. The air and fuel ratio is always on a preset a/f map. No matter what you do to the air system(intake or exhaust), it will correct for it. The CTX is set up this way. It is self tunning continuously via tps, iac, air temp, O2 sensor and the pcm. They still have a map, but the only reason to change it is for tweaking fuel settings and possibly spark timing. Unless your setting up to race(no point of that on a CTX), there is no need to mess with the mapping.

The CTX has a catalytic converter, that is more then enuff backpressure for whatever you do to the exhaust after.
 

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Remapping isn't necessary but these engines are originally mapped to run very lean for better fuel economy. If its power and performance your looking for, you could get it done. Power Commander now offers one for the CTX.

Dyno testing was done on the manual CTX when it was first released by several of the major media rags but I doubt anyone is going to go to the expense on a personal basis. There still isn't a market for high performance exhaust and the associated dyno testing for the CTX. So far, all of the exhaust manufacturers advertising for the CTX is just selling a universal exhaust.
 

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I am searching for a different exhaust myself. The Danmoto GP Carbon looks good to me.
But I don't want loud, just a mellow deeper tone.
I do wonder about changing the exhaust and loosing backpressure.
Other fuel injected bikes I'm familiar with require remapping of the electronic brain when that is done. Also, remapping is needed when going to a free flow intake combined with a free flowing exhaust. Often, using aftermarket tuning add-ons such as a Power Commander or others that change fuel flow and spark are needed to get optimum performance after the changes. Many bikes (Triumph twins with EFI for one) have dozens of maps for retuning. In fact, Triumph itself offers new maps after only an exhaust change. A remap after install of their TORS exhaust is required by Triumph. I put those pipes on a Triumph America and there was a noticeable loss of performance until the remap was done by the dealer.
If the CTX electronic engine controls do sense changes and correct for them, we are indeed fortunate.
I would be interested to see dyno results after only losing the muffler or going to one with very little restriction. Sometimes the loud factor masks the loss of low end torque.
It could be that pipe removal does not alter the back pressure-if so we would be good to go.
At any rate, I'll follow this to gain more info before I make any changes.
I had the dan moto carbon gp exhaust on my last bike, 2009 suzuki gladius. It sounded great! That bike was a 650 v twin and it sounded low, grumbly, loud but not too much. If you get one on the CTX please let me know. I loved the Dan Moto on the Gladius.
 

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I am also interested in the possible installation of the Danmoto exhaust if/when it becomes available for the CTX700. Please let me know when there is additional information.
 
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I just ordered a new radiant shorty exhaust for my 2015 ctx700 DCT. I've read all the comments in this forum and everybody's says that the bike is self-tuning and I should be fine if I just put the exhaust on. But I'm really worried about potentially damaging the engine. How long have you guys been running the radiant shorty exhaust and have you noticed any ill effects to it? Thanks
 

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I just ordered a new radiant shorty exhaust for my 2015 ctx700 DCT. I've read all the comments in this forum and everybody's says that the bike is self-tuning and I should be fine if I just put the exhaust on. But I'm really worried about potentially damaging the engine. How long have you guys been running the radiant shorty exhaust and have you noticed any ill effects to it? Thanks
I seriously doubt you will find a correct answer considering the CTX is just going on its fourth year and the short exhausts have only been out a little over 2 1/2 years. There has been very little reported based on short term effects and its way too early to expect any reported long term effects. So far, most members have reported no discernable performance difference. As of this date, I'm not aware of any dyno testing having been done.
 

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I think that before you make the switch you should go out and find a deserted section of road and do some 0->whatever timed runs over the same distance. Since you've got DCT it should be easy to get consistent passes and you can hold the stopwatch in your left hand since there's no need for clutching. Then after you swap do the same and see if there's any difference. I'd suggest 5 runs each so you get a good sample. Try to be as consistent as possible on rider position, throttle position, etc.

Between the elapsed time and the speedo reading you should get some idea if there's any power difference.
 

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You will not notice a power difference with a shorty alone. It is so small you can only see it on a dyno. Doing road tests, you will see more rider errors than anything actually notable. On top of that, look at drag racing. It is nearly impossible to get consistent similar-same results. There are alot of varibles and they continously change.

You will be just fine with a shorty if you want to go that route. If you have any skepticism, than just don't do it.
 

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I'm more worried about the shorty causing damage to the engine... however dealerships that I talked to here in St Louis said I should be fine
 

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On top of that, look at drag racing. It is nearly impossible to get consistent similar-same results.
Have you never been to a drag strip? ET Bracket racing is all about consistency.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracket_racing

Pro drag racers dealing with manual clutch launches and timing lights response time can reel off run after run with tenth of a second consistency. With a DCT CTX there's no need to worry about spinning the tire (where the most variability might happen) and the ECU controls the shifting.

Since he'd only be testing elapsed time and not trying to launch to the change of the starting lights but rather hitting the stop watch and twisting the throttle simultaneously that is another variable gone. I'd be very surprised if the driver couldn't learn to twitch both hands at the same time.

Ensure that the body position is the same (so there is no variation from aerodynamic drag effects) and make 5 or so runs, and the mode of the times should be pretty clear.
 

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Have you never been to a drag strip? ET Bracket racing is all about consistency.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracket_racing

Pro drag racers dealing with manual clutch launches and timing lights response time can reel off run after run with tenth of a second consistency. With a DCT CTX there's no need to worry about spinning the tire (where the most variability might happen) and the ECU controls the shifting.

Since he'd only be testing elapsed time and not trying to launch to the change of the starting lights but rather hitting the stop watch and twisting the throttle simultaneously that is another variable gone. I'd be very surprised if the driver couldn't learn to twitch both hands at the same time.

Ensure that the body position is the same (so there is no variation from aerodynamic drag effects) and make 5 or so runs, and the mode of the times should be pretty clear.
Have you ever seen amature drag racing? Reaction time alone can vary tremendously. If that is off, everythig else is off! How many pro dragsters with a CTX700 are looking at this forum? None! Without the skill, you won't have adequate consitancy! Engine temp, warmed parts, lubed parts, humidity, ambient air temp, terrain etc. are all still constantly changing variables! What about the weight loss, that is another changing contributor by itself.

Then let's talk about the exhaust aspect. Improved power doesn't mean it will go faster off the line in a drag, in fact it can go slower. Changing the exhaust (more free flow) will typicaly reduce torque and increase horsepower. This means it will be slower at the bottom end, but faster at top end, that also changes everything just like changing gear ratios!

Then on a small 50 horse bike with a say 1 hp gain, you couldn't physicaly notice it anyway, it is just too minute of a difference! Even if you tried with a clock, the difference would be in a tenth down to a thousandths of a second difference. There is just too much room for error setting the clock alone. If you want a real accurate before and after reading, get a dynamometering done!
 

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You are ignoring that ET Bracket is an amateur part of drag racing and is typically done with street cars/bikes, not all-out race vehicles. People who are good at running brackets are VERY consistent. If they aren't they get beaten by someone who is.

Can you snap the fingers on both hands at the same time? I think most people probably can, if they can, they could do the testing I outlined above on a DCT bike. DCT and low horsepower will take the guesswork out of launching, and doing multiple runs and looking where the data centers eliminates more inconsistencies that might occur. It isn't rocket science.

I looked at the OP's profile and I see the bike is a manual, so it would be a bit more difficult to time alone from a standing start (though there's enough track-day electronics around that they could still manage and I suspect there's a phone app using the phone accelerometers and GPS that would detect the launch and time it from point to point, or you can buy a device like those tested in this 2005 article Do Inexpensive Performance Meters Work? ? Feature ? Car and Driver ). But if someone wants to see if a change is made without renting a couple of dyno runs manual stop watches have been used for testing for a century or so.

What might work better is a top gear acceleration test over a set course. Enter the trap at the same speed low in the power band and make sure there's a good 5-10 seconds of acceleration time (but that the speed doesn't top out in the traps). F=MA, so faster acceleration (shorter time) through the course means more power is available.

And yes, I've seen and done amateur drag racing from the starting line in motocross and road racing since 1971 (and I've generally been a good starter), as well as having run my road racers at the drag strip for tuning (funny, get the jetting and timing dialed in so there is more power and the ET drops and the top speed increases). I've also been involved in extensive dyno tuning of several of my bikes.

What I've outlined is a simple test procedure that will work if a bit of care is taken. Is it sensitive enough to detect a tenth hp improvement should one happen. Probably not. But then a lot of dynos will struggle to reliably detect that amount of change. A dyno should be good for half horsepower changes, at least the one that my bikes were developed on would reliably do that.

The OP appears interested in finding out if the exhaust modification will change power. My guess is there probably is not going to be any change. But if they are curious enough they can do some simple testing that will give them more data than "boy howdy, it sure sounds powerful now!" or "the box said this was worth 10%, but it didn't say 10% of what".
 

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I believe the OP has clearly stated he is more concerned with how it will effect or possibly harm the engine than performance. Is it possible? The answer is yes until further testing or long term mileage results determine other wise. Flow rates of the two have not been tested or compared that I'm aware of.
 

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HI,

I would like to fit a Radiant Shorty muffler to the CTX. On their site it says:

"Backpressure is decreased with our exhaust. This provides less exhaust restriction to increase horsepower at full throttle. Tuning is recommended for best performance, but is not required. Without tuning, horsepower is increased only at full throttle and torque is decreased during normal riding. If tuning is done, both horsepower and torque are increased. "

Is this really the case ? I know there are members who use no muffler at all.
I took that "is this really the case ?" as an inquiry about performance changes. The rest of the concerns seemed about noise level.

In any event, zoomdba probably has all the information they need by now.
 

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I took that "is this really the case ?" as an inquiry about performance changes. The rest of the concerns seemed about noise level.

In any event, zoomdba probably has all the information they need by now.
I'm referring to Jeff Millers recent question rekindling this old thread from 2015.
 

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You are ignoring that ET Bracket is an amateur part of drag racing and is typically done with street cars/bikes, not all-out race vehicles. People who are good at running brackets are VERY consistent. If they aren't they get beaten by someone who is.

Can you snap the fingers on both hands at the same time? I think most people probably can, if they can, they could do the testing I outlined above on a DCT bike. DCT and low horsepower will take the guesswork out of launching, and doing multiple runs and looking where the data centers eliminates more inconsistencies that might occur. It isn't rocket science.

I looked at the OP's profile and I see the bike is a manual, so it would be a bit more difficult to time alone from a standing start (though there's enough track-day electronics around that they could still manage and I suspect there's a phone app using the phone accelerometers and GPS that would detect the launch and time it from point to point, or you can buy a device like those tested in this 2005 article Do Inexpensive Performance Meters Work? ? Feature ? Car and Driver ). But if someone wants to see if a change is made without renting a couple of dyno runs manual stop watches have been used for testing for a century or so.

What might work better is a top gear acceleration test over a set course. Enter the trap at the same speed low in the power band and make sure there's a good 5-10 seconds of acceleration time (but that the speed doesn't top out in the traps). F=MA, so faster acceleration (shorter time) through the course means more power is available.

And yes, I've seen and done amateur drag racing from the starting line in motocross and road racing since 1971 (and I've generally been a good starter), as well as having run my road racers at the drag strip for tuning (funny, get the jetting and timing dialed in so there is more power and the ET drops and the top speed increases). I've also been involved in extensive dyno tuning of several of my bikes.

What I've outlined is a simple test procedure that will work if a bit of care is taken. Is it sensitive enough to detect a tenth hp improvement should one happen. Probably not. But then a lot of dynos will struggle to reliably detect that amount of change. A dyno should be good for half horsepower changes, at least the one that my bikes were developed on would reliably do that.

The OP appears interested in finding out if the exhaust modification will change power. My guess is there probably is not going to be any change. But if they are curious enough they can do some simple testing that will give them more data than "boy howdy, it sure sounds powerful now!" or "the box said this was worth 10%, but it didn't say 10% of what".
I guess you forgot the amature aspect~

I would love to see you consitently get timing in the thousandths of a second with one hand while doing something else with the other hand!!!

Speed traps are no good either. With the ground moving at 30 feet per second at 20.4 mph and more at faster speeds, you are making the accuracy even harder to reach. And again, you don't understad how torque and horsepower changes effect acceleration.

So much has gone over your head it isn't even funny! There is far more to drag or any other kind of racing than the driver alone, even as little as a 2 degree change in the ambient air can make a world of a difference! An experienced racer knows this. It is very important to have like conditions when trying to compare mods on the track or your driveway, everything makes a difference. Do yourself a favor, do it right, a mostly controlled similar enviroment and real readings, dyno it...

A dyno can read in the tenths of a horsepower or better too BTW...
@Jeff Miller
No worries if you want to do this. As I said, if you are skeptical, then just don't do it. I can promise you it will be just fine if you do decide to do it, you won't have any issues!
 
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