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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I just purchased a CTX 700 about a week ago, and I'm loving it! I rode a Honda Rebel for 2 years as I was learning the ropes. This is my 2nd bike.
Obviously one of the differences between the Rebel and the CTX 700 DCT is no clutch. I found myself in a Bike Night (crowded) parking lot yesterday trying to exit. When I put it in Drive mode, the bike is still until I give it some throttle. My challenge was that, even though trying to give it just a little throttle, it started moving faster than what I wanted to in the parking lot. And there's no clutch to grab to just coast. So my alternative was the brake, which also was kind of lurch-y. How do you handle these situations? Is it a matter of practice with the throttle, to just give it a tad? Can I hit the N button to take it out of gear and gently slow down? I thought about it afterward, maybe using the Neutral, but don't know if that would be safe or appropriate. I guess I'm more used to the friction zone of the clutch for this kind of situation and I need to learn to adapt on the automatic. Any advice?
 

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It is a matter of practice. Try the two different drive modes 'D' & 'S' choose one which is more suitable for the condition. 'S' is more aggressive. Also i have seen that if you keep adjusting the gear as per your needs the onboard computer learns your choices
 

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Yes it takes some getting used to. Here is what I have found...YMMV. Put it in sport mode because it will hold the gear in first for much longer and you don't get a sudden shift in the middle of slow speed maneuvers. Then practice feathering the rear brake with your foot. Once you get the feeling it will almost be just like operating the friction zone with a clutch. I did this for about 15 minutes in an empty parking lot and felt like a pro after.
 

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Practice... practice... practice. I'd find myself an empty parking lot and spend time practicing slow speed maneuvers, the kid of thing you'd be doing in traffic (crawling forward, slow turns, slow lane changes, etc). The CTX has a low center of gravity, so it'll go easy on you. I did the same, being a regular commuter in traffic, and the CTX is great for it.
 

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You may need to check and adjust the amount of slack you have in your throttle cables, there's plenty of online videos to show you how to check and adjust. Also you can adjust your fit to the bike by rotating the controls on the handlebar, available videos about that also. Your comfort on the bike will affect how you handle it.
 

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Two tricks and you'll be fine in no time:

1. Be gentle on the throttle, it's very sensitive

2. A little bit of rear brake helps. That's your "clutch" at slow speeds.

People think the DCT is good for beginners but that's wrong. It's actually more difficult at slow speeds than manual bikes.
This is great advice. The only other bike I've ridden is a Yamaha 400 Special. One from '81 and one from '82. I love to ride it but I get lost in the gears, forget to shift. All sorts of trouble. (My car is a manual so I don't know what my problem is.) The DCT is amazing, and I find that overall it's easier. But the slow speed maneuvering is different, and I'm still working on that.
 

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Not sure if it was my bike or it learned, but found that just marginally turning the throttle would slowly move the bike. There was a zero point throttle movement where nothing happened, then the marginal section, beyond that was regular throttle. Turning it had to be very slow to reach that point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is great advice. The only other bike I've ridden is a Yamaha 400 Special. One from '81 and one from '82. I love to ride it but I get lost in the gears, forget to shift. All sorts of trouble. (My car is a manual so I don't know what my problem is.) The DCT is amazing, and I find that overall it's easier. But the slow speed maneuvering is different, and I'm still working on that.
Oh my gosh! Me TOO! I drive a manual car every day, but I would lose track of what gear I was in on my bike. I really wanted a bike with an indicator showing what gear it's in. Seems like Harleys tend to have that, but not Hondas. Anyway, I found this CTX and test rode it and loved it.

Thanks, everyone, for the pointers. I will keep practicing. I will also ask my friend about the throttle, whether it needs adjustment. Probably I just need to work on my skills.
 

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Most newer manual bikes have visual gear indicators.

The throttle tamer does help, and the rear brake conversion on the left hand grip really helps. At least it helps me.

I have always driven manual cars, but I'm not religious about it like some. I find the DCT really lets me relax while riding and focus more on what is important.
 

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Most newer manual bikes have visual gear indicators.

The throttle tamer does help, and the rear brake conversion on the left hand grip really helps. At least it helps me.

I have always driven manual cars, but I'm not religious about it like some. I find the DCT really lets me relax while riding and focus more on what is important.

Conversion to left grip for rear brake? Do tell more....
 

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Hi everyone! I just purchased a CTX 700 about a week ago, and I'm loving it! I rode a Honda Rebel for 2 years as I was learning the ropes. This is my 2nd bike.
Obviously one of the differences between the Rebel and the CTX 700 DCT is no clutch. I found myself in a Bike Night (crowded) parking lot yesterday trying to exit. When I put it in Drive mode, the bike is still until I give it some throttle. My challenge was that, even though trying to give it just a little throttle, it started moving faster than what I wanted to in the parking lot. And there's no clutch to grab to just coast. So my alternative was the brake, which also was kind of lurch-y. How do you handle these situations? Is it a matter of practice with the throttle, to just give it a tad? Can I hit the N button to take it out of gear and gently slow down? I thought about it afterward, maybe using the Neutral, but don't know if that would be safe or appropriate. I guess I'm more used to the friction zone of the clutch for this kind of situation and I need to learn to adapt on the automatic. Any advice?
Welcome to the Forum 💛
 

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Conversion to left grip for rear brake? Do tell more....
 
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1. Correct idle speed: 1200 rpm
2: Minimal throttle cable slack (2mm per Honda)
3: Twist throttle very gently. Remember: IT WILL NOT STALL.
 

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1. Correct idle speed: 1200 rpm
2: Minimal throttle cable slack (2mm per Honda)
3: Twist throttle very gently. Remember: it will not stall.
I think Arrgh covered the bases, and if #1 or #2 is not met get it fixed. #3 could be the key for you. In general, with a standard clutch you apply a bit of throttle before engaging the clutch and starting to move. A little extra throttle won't hurt anything, and could keep it from stalling. Sit on your bike, in drive, at idle. Repeat 3 times: IT WILL NOT STALL. Very slowly apply throttle.

I like my CTX a lot, but my new bike is a Rebel. It's also has a DCT.
 
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