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While I haven't purchased it yet (within the month though) I'm planning to ride a CTX700D. My question though to the forum is about the kind of electrical power the bike is able to produce. If I upgrade heated grips, the power socket, and decide to add some lights to it, will they all work or is it asking too much? At some point heated gear may also add into the equation. I just wanted to make sure I had plenty of juice to play with and I can't seem to find any information stating what the bike is capable of at all.

Thanks for listening to the ramblings of a noob.
 

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I run heated gear on my CTX700D. I've had no issues with the battery.

You have to be careful because you can't bump start a bike with an automatic transmission. If I were planning to add lights and other electrical stuff, I think I'd also add a volt meter.
 

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Im no electrical engineer, but I know this. Lights don't take much currant to run. Heated grips along with heated jacket or gloves will really start to take its toll. If you are running at a high rpm for extended periods of time you may be all right, but short trips at low speeds it may cause an issue.

Just my opinion but I would save the money on the heated grips and get some battery powered gloves. That would help with your electrical draw also.
 

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How does one calculate what they can add on given the alternator capacity is 0.45 kW/5000 rpm.
The headlight is 60/55 W
Licence light is 5W
Front turn signal/position light is 21/5 WX2
Rear turn signal light is 21WX2
Various indicators are LED
Peter
 

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How does one calculate what they can add on given the alternator capacity is 0.45 kW/5000 rpm.
The headlight is 60/55 W
Licence light is 5W
Front turn signal/position light is 21/5 WX2
Rear turn signal light is 21WX2
Various indicators are LED
Peter

.45kw I believe is 450 watts. so add all the rest to see how much is used.
 

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Just my opinion but I would save the money on the heated grips and get some battery powered gloves. That would help with your electrical draw also.
I've just purchased a pair of battery-powered gloves and did alot of research trying to find a solution that would work for as cheap as possible for riding in temps at or below freezing that I've detailed on another thread. I steered away from wired-in options for several reasons:

1. I have a need only for warming my fingers, as this is the only issue I've had with discomfort even down to the low twenties, so I don't expect to need to plug in for other areas of my body in the future. My non-heated, winter gear keeps me acceptably warm on my 40 minute commutes, so for me, I only needed to solve the frozen fingers problem at or below freezing.

2. I did not want the extra expense and extra complexity that comes with plugging in, including the power outlet which must be installed, and the controller/troller, and although I believe the wired-in systems probably provide warmer, more reliable, and good-for-long-ride comfort and make more sense if I were touring, my goal was to simply get rid of the discomfort of freezing fingers for my commutes; not to be toasty warm for longer rides, and I came to the conclusion that the hassle of charging batteries in my house and having to reinstall them in the glove pockets each time would probably be better for the fifty or sixty commutes per year that I'll use them than doing the wired system.

3. I did not like the idea of having to plug myself in, although I can't really know if it's that bad of a thing since I've never done it, but I didn't like the thought of being tethered.

If one has not looked in to mobile electric gloves but is considering them, my research leads me to believe that there is still not alot of choices out there for battery power, especially if one is requires their gloves to be designed motorcycle specific. The only real, motorcycle specific designed gloves I found was Gerbing T7s, and they are the most reviewed and the biggest sellers of all of them. They get great reviews but have the down side that one must first buy the Hybrid glove for around $230 and the the package to make them mobile, which brings the price up over $300. The second drawback of the Gerbing Glove is that, like all but the Warmthru models, at least according to the reviews, do not have a suitably large gauntlet to allow for easy hand entry and exit with the batteries installed, have a cumbersome method for placing and removing the batteries, and additionally, they do not have a large enough gauntlet to allow the glove to go over one's winter jacket. Only the Warmthru (at least according to the reviews) have included this feature of having a normal-type gauntlet as is seen in other MC winter gloves, even though the Warmthru is a general winter glove; not a MC-specific glove.

My research led me to two directions to go with battery power with respect to gloves:

(1) Use your own winter gloves with battery-powered liners. The price range is from around $140-$180. If you go this route, you'll need very well-insulated winter gloves as heating one's hands without good insulation will allow the heat to escape too easily and one would be better off getting the full glove, because all the top brands come with very good insulation. The liners are not too big a savings over the full gloves with respect to price, but if one has a pair of winter gloves that he or she really likes and wants to incorporate the heat into their own system, I would think this is a good way to go. I did not go this route, because my winter gloves have only 100 grams of Thinsulate, but if I had already owned some very high quality winter gloves, I would have chosen the liners, because this would probably be the warmest solution, and would leave me true, MC-specific gloves as the top layer.

The following liner selections had mostly good reviews. Caution: Stay away from the Target/Walmart cheap gloves or liners. They get horrible reviews, most say they can't tell a difference with or without power, and it looks like in this case, you get what you pay for.

Gerbing, $170 Glove Liner - Collection | Gerbing Thermovelocity Protection . Warmthru G3, $175 Warmthru G3 Heated Gloveliners- Black . Cozy Winters $180 Battery Heated Glove Liners | CozyWinters . Venture Heat $150 Battery Heated Glove Liners - City Collection by VentureHeat

(2) Battery-powered gloves. Below are some well-reviewed products. The prices range generally from $220-$450. Venture Heat Epic 2.0 Epic 2.0 Battery Heated Gloves - VentureHeat . Warmthru G5 or G6 Fingerheaters G5 Super-Hot Carbon Fibre Fingerheater Gloves - Standard - Warm To The Bone . Gerbing T5 Motorcycle Glove
T5 Glove - Collection | Gerbing Thermovelocity Protection . Volt Titan 7V https://voltheat.com/product/titan-mens-7v-heated-gloves/

I chose the Warmthru G5 Fingerheaters, mostly because I got them for a much lower price than the list price by going directly to their Scottish website and when I saw that I could get well-reviewed, high-quality, battery-powered heated gloves from Warmthru cheaper than I could from Gerbing, I went for it. If anyone looks at Warmthru, he or she will see that their are many possible uprgrades for powering these gloves and the price, which starts at a list price of $275, goes up to around $450 depending on what battery/charging options one chooses and whether one chooses the water resistant G5, or the waterproof G6. I chose the standard model and got them for around $217 buying directly from Warmthru. I saved the $35 extra that they get for the G6 gloves, because I figure if it's 35 degrees or below, I will not often worry about them getting soaking wet.

It has been too warm for me to try them out and now it's too icy, so I can't review my choice. I have charged the batteries, however, plugged them in, put the four batteries in the pouches and tried on the gloves. They are as promised; good size pouches for easy manipulation with thin (not bulky) batteries. Gloves seem warm and sturdy and a very simplistic system. Just plug them in at the pouch; turn them on at the battery; velcro them into the pouch; put my hands in the gloves; and I'm set to ride. The standard system does not have different temperature settings, and the Fingerheaters are the only one's that don't offer this feature standard. The higher-voltage batteries for the Fingerheaters do come with that feature, and the settings are directly on the battery; not on the gloves like all the other brands.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the useful information guys. It's given me lots to think on for what I want to start looking into for cold weather gear with the bike.
 

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I too ride in all weather -- no, I draw the line at spiked tires and ice.

While I can find no data on the Honda OEM heated grips, the Oxfords I had on my V-Strom were rated at 30W @ 100%, and I wouldn't imagine the Honda grips to be that much different.

I prefer a BMW-style outlet, and two for two-up, and have heated gloves that plug into the heated jacket liner. The gloves are rated at 27W and the liner at 77W @ 100%. These plus the lights, even allowing for two up, should be well within the stated 450W for the CTX.

A real challenge comes if one desires extra-legal high-power lights . . . a near necessity outside the city with all the deer out there.
 

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LED lighting has little draw, the charging port for a cell phone will have little draw. Heated equipment is where the draw will come from. If you can afford battery powered gloves they will probably be more comfortable than grips and in about the same price point. Heated grips are great, but if you plan on using a heated jacket or pants it will place a strain if you power a lot of other options at the same time.
 

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One should remember that the 450watt charging capability is rated at 5000 rpms. The bike cruising in 6th gear at hwy speeds wont come any where near that. Adding an electrical outlet to run electronic equipment is perfectly okay. If you decide to add lighting, stick to LED's. Heated grips are also perfectly okay but you should consider heated gloves if your running in really cold weather. The grips work great but wont keep the tops of your hands warm in extreme cold. Heated jackets and suits can pose an issue depending on how much they draw. 2 would certainly pose a problem.
 

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On the subject of warmth: Check out the prices between "motorcycle" and "snowmobile" items, like gloves.

I was looking at Gore-Tex gloves and the snowmobile prices were cheaper their motorcycle counterparts.

Sure you may not get the specific armor placement, but the quality and protection is there.
 

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On the subject of warmth: Check out the prices between "motorcycle" and "snowmobile" items, like gloves.

I was looking at Gore-Tex gloves and the snowmobile prices were cheaper their motorcycle counterparts.

Sure you may not get the specific armor placement, but the quality and protection is there.
You might get the warmth sure, but the gloves you talk about weren't meant to hit pavement at 70mph and survive. Snow is very different!
It's your hands though, do what you want.
 

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I wear the heated gerbing jacket and gloves. Keeps my body core warm, especially at the neck, and my hands are heated through. I'm not a fan of heated grips. To me useless in the northern climes unless it's warm enough to just take the chill off a bit. I've had no issue at all with the heated gear on the c. I'm going to install an led headlight bulb, plus led driving lights to conserve power output a bit. But as it stands not a problem.
 

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Understood. I guess that makes me an idiot. What was I thinking?!?
Then we're both idiots!!! Because I was seeing some great deals on the snowmobile gear that I would gladly buy and wear on a motorcycle! Any protection is better than no protection! Just so as long as it's functional for a motorcycle rider.

When I went down last year my worst injuries wouldn't have been any better if I'd have worn motorcycle gear! I would have still been banged up in those areas where I hit the pavement. (And any $200 motorcycle pants would have been torn up!)
 

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Then we're both idiots!!! Because I was seeing some great deals on the snowmobile gear that I would gladly buy and wear on a motorcycle! Any protection is better than no protection! Just so as long as it's functional for a motorcycle rider.

When I went down last year my worst injuries wouldn't have been any better if I'd have worn motorcycle gear! I would have still been banged up in those areas where I hit the pavement. (And any $200 motorcycle pants would have been torn up!)
There's never, ever any guarantees when it comes to wearing motorcycle gear. Every accident is different. I've had both good luck and bad luck while wearing it and good luck and bad luck while not wearing it ( always wore helmet, boots, gloves). As far as gloves go, I have had good luck with well insulated leather winter gloves both times I took a spill while wearing them. Most winter gloves do not have armor or at least very little due to the reduced dexterity with all the additional padding. Its just too hard to grip the throttle or use the clutch and brake. When purchasing a pair, I usually look for gloves with an additional layer of leather on the back of the palm and top of the hand for additional abrasion protection. I prefer gauntlet gloves for the additional protection of the wrist and for better warmth.
 

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My gerbing heated motorcycle gloves offer no more protection than any snowmobile gloves. THE DO offer better heat and warmth than unheated gloves, but that's debatable as if it were that cold I wouldn't be riding anyway. I've never seen an armored pair of winter gloves so I think it a moot point. I'll take warm hands to control the controls any day.
 
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