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Hey guys has anyone ever installed a power commander on there Honda CTX 700. I have a 2014 model and sometimes I feel like want a little more from the bike.
 

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This has been discussed many times, particularly the Magnum chip. Seems we can't get any takers for the first one. An old member Devilsfan did have his ECM re-programed and claimed it helped, but he had a Clutch and very hard to do on the DCT
 

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A little more what? Engines work inside a triangle of Power, Mileage and Emissions. You want more power and your mileage will go down. Honda spent $millions getting what they felt was the best compromise. There is no magic that breaks that reality with a Power Commander or any other fuel mapping mods.

Steve
 

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These bikes weren't built to be "go fast bikes," not even close. Suggest you look into a good used sport bike, there're thousands out there for sale @ steal prices.
 

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Normal Power Commanders won't work on the DCT equipped bikes. Honda built in systems that won't accept the input. There is a system from a company in Europe that has circumvented this, and that was discussed on a thread earlier this year. I believe the cost was around $800 US.

I'll echo what was previously said... If you want more power, the least expensive thing would be to trade for a different bike. #Rebel13 did a ton of work to his engine, modifying the ports, eliminating the Catalytic Converter, and more, and his outcome was that it wasn't worth the effort. This engine was developed from the original Honda FIT car engine. That engine was designed to be cheap, basic, transportation. Some of the design parameters eliminated possibility of easily improving performance. It would take a whole new head, and other parts, to make this puppy growl. And, if you did, then the economy, and longevity, would suffer. The chassis wasn't designed for performance either, so like has been said... look for a good used sport bike.
 

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Hey guys has anyone ever installed a power commander on there Honda CTX 700. I have a 2014 model and sometimes I feel like want a little more from the bike.
I see this is your first post and thanks for participating. I don’t think there is any hidden or repressed performance that can be gained by any FI remapping. Hondaprokevin is an excellent resource for all of the design ideas of what Honda wanted to create concerning the CTX, especially the color DCT diagrams of how they married the dual clutch to the standard motorcycle transmission. One quote “The 670cc liquid-cooled 8-valve SOHC parallel twin-cylinder engine powering the CTX700N was designed from the outset to deliver outstanding bottom-end and mid-range torque – the rpm area many riders use the most on the road – with superb fuel efficiency” pretty much says it all. Not a high performance design but stop light to stop light it can hold its own for basically a closer to 650cc engine. Save your money and run the bike to its limits which most people never explore. According to the chart the sweet spot is at about 5200 RPM where HP meets torque. In other words ride it like you stole it.
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Hey guys has anyone ever installed a power commander on there Honda CTX 700. I have a 2014 model and sometimes I feel like want a little more from the bike.
Sure! I call it the "DAG".

I mean, I'm almost always cruising between 2000 and 4000 RPM, where there's enough power to keep speed steady. I Drop A Gear and the RPM goes up a couple thousand - instant extra power up to about 5200, like dgall said.

It's not "blow your doors off" power, but it commands the power that is available to show up for the party.


... run the bike to its limits which most people never explore. According to the chart the sweet spot is at about 5200 RPM where HP meets torque. In other words ride it like you stole it.
You searched for ctx | Honda-Pro Kevin
 

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I've never understood that expression. If I was to steal a bike I would carefully obey every speed limit and traffic law so I don't draw attention from the police and get my butt thrown in jail. :confused:

Steve
That's because you are not a thief!:D
 

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I've never understood that expression. If I was to steal a bike I would carefully obey every speed limit and traffic law so I don't draw attention from the police and get my butt thrown in jail. :confused:

Steve
Horse thieves knew that everyone runs a beast hard for spurts, so nobody judged them as a thief until they had gone far enough and without breaks to dump the poor overworked animal and steal another. No rest, no water, no checking and fixing shoes, all out till it breaks, and didn't care if the horse could never work or run again.

For a single race or show, or dire need you might push your own to the limit "as if" you stole it. You'd still stop before permanent damage was done unless a life was at steak, praise the animal for supporting you, and give it the best care and feeding to make it ready for the next go 'round.

Now days too many of us don't understand. We baby the horse on the road, and deny it the checks and maintenance it needs to keep healthy. If we did ride it "LIKE" we stole it sometimes, maybe we'd take more time to care for it and make sure it lasts for next week's race.

I'm talking to me more than to y'all, I haven't done my chain this weekend and don't have an auto-oiler. Guess I'd best get in some barn time after church.
 

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Ah, so this is supposed to be a horsey expression from days gone by. Like "put the cart before the horse", the "carrot and/or stick approach" and the "grass is greener on the other side", among many others. I've owned horses for a long time, currently own 4 and have 2 rescues on the property and haven't heard that one associated with horses, but I guess I can see that logic. Of course we still aren't talking about a horse.

Steve
 

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I've never understood that expression. If I was to steal a bike I would carefully obey every speed limit and traffic law so I don't draw attention from the police and get my butt thrown in jail. :confused:

Steve
That's because you are not a thief!:D
Of course we still aren't talking about a horse.

Steve
Not a horse?
Then I must agree with Bob, and even add when detailed to augment safety patrols they instructed us to watch for those too slow or careful at stop signs. They didn't belong, or had something to hide. The residents we were there to protect were like the fox in Aesop's fable of the Fox and the Lion. Their familiarity with Lion's habits of not attacking traffic violators did breed contempt with the minor traffic laws and the squad cars and armed guards all around them.
 

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Just a novice but always learning , is it correct to achieve the most efficient forward motion is it best to shift at the point of where max torque is just declining and HP rising meet or is there a better strategy.
What do you mean by efficient forward motion? Are you maximizing fuel economy or 1/4 mile times (acceleration/top speed)?

As a data point in a road test of an early NC700X (same engine as the CTX) I saw this:
NC700X 1/4 mile: 14.17 sec @ 88.41 mph
102.5 mph top speed

motorcycle.com middleweight cruiser shootout dyno results for CTX, no 1/4 mile data in the article
41.2 lbf/ft torque @ 4900 RPM
44 hp @ 6000 RPM

I tried to make a match for the torque curve from the motorcycle.com article in some performance simulation software and presumed a 700 lbf test weight with rider, manual CTX gearing of 16/43. The simulation is roughly in line with that road test (no data on weights in the road test and I used the default cDa drag numbers in the program) and I don't know if a CTX tends to run slower/faster in the 1/4 mile than an NC. I also used the default rolling radius of 300mm for the rear tire which may well be a little different from a standard CTX rear tire.

Calculated top speed with 6400 RPM red line: 182.29 kph/113 mph max @ 6379 RPM
402 meters / 1/4 mile standing start run. 6400 red line, shift speed in all gears as shown by first number, last number is the RPM in 6th at the finish:

6400 14.3 @ 150 kph (93.2 mph) 5238 RPM at end
6200 14.3 @ 149 kph (92.6 mph) 5207 RPM at end
6000 14.5 @ 147 kph (91.3 mph) 5173 RPM at end
5600 14.6 @ 146 kph (90.7 mph) 5094 RPM at end
5252 14.9 @ 144 kph (89.5 mph) 5025 RPM at end
4900 15.1 @ 142 kph (88.2 mph) 4955 RPM at end

4900 RPM is max torque, 6000 RPM is max hp, but the hp curve is pretty flat from peak to red line with just a hp or two drop off. You need to keep in mind that if you shift at X RPM, you'll drop some percentage of RPM when engaging the next gear. So shifting at peak torque would have the next gear starting at some point below the peak torque RPM. You want the most area under the power curve between those high/low RPM points. Shifting at the higher RPM (as shown in the chart) does that, and gives lower times/higher exit speed. But note the difference between shifting at 200 RPM past peak power and 400 RPM past peak power (6200 and 6400) gives pretty much the same results.

I like the CTX power delivery for cruising along and having a nice flat powerband that doesn't vary a lot, but it wouldn't be my choice for a drag bike. :D But if you need to have the fastest acceleration through a 1/4 mile from a standing start then shifting a bit before red line is probably the way to do it.

cheers,
Michael
 

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I'm waiting for the 1300 ctx to come out with the dct until then I'll ride the 700 in sport mode, most of the people I ride with can't keep up with me on an all day ride{shifting fatigue} unless were on an interstate anyway.
 

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Just a novice but always learning , is it correct to achieve the most efficient forward motion is it best to shift at the point of where max torque is just declining and HP rising meet or is there a better strategy.
What you mean is most work. And the answer for that is always at max horsepower. That is the sweet spot to be, not max rpm and not max torque, but at max horsepower. Horsepower is the rate of work.

As for general engine efficiency, you want lowest rpm in highest gear possible. This obviously has no relation to acceleration.
 

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Wasn't the CTX1300 discontinued in 2015?
Somewhere around then... If you want to stick with the cruiser style with DCT, you now have to jump up to a goldwing....
 
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