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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yes, you saw it here first.

A Raspberry-Pi powered CTX700.

Here is the display:



It shows:
Gear position (currently "-" because the bike's not moving)
K/L-I - km per litre instantaneous
K/L-A - km per litre average
Fuel - left in the tank (litres)
DTE - distance to empty
Engine Temp - the coolant temp (degC)
Air Temp - the manifold air temp (degC)
Voltage
Fuel Sensor - the time for the capacitor to discharge through the tank level resistor (I need that for calibrating the tank)
Oiler - the percentage of the chain oiler cycle
Injector - fuel injector reading
Comms - number of comms errors

The display (a Medion smartphone) updates every 5 secs

The computer looks like this:



It's a Raspberry-Pi B+ with
>PiFace digital I/O
>FTDI USB Serial dongle
>a self-made interface board to the OBD connector
>a self-made interface board to the tank sensor
>a WIFI adapter to enable the display to connect.

The R-Pi interrogates the ECU about once a second. It also runs the chain oiler program, which, because it now has access to the speed of the bike, doesn't oil when the bike is stopped, and oils more when it's going fast.

Cool eh?

Yes, I'm a nerd

Gonzo

PS. I wish to acknowledge all the assistance I got from the guys on forum.pgmfi.org . Finding the data locations and Honda protocols would have been impossible without their help. Thanks guys.
 

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Awesome!
Way beyond my scope though.
What sensor did you use to get coolant temp?
You think a coolant temp gauge by itself would be fairly easy to rig up?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The computer talks to the ECU and gets the following info: RPM, speed, incoming air temp, engine coolant temp, fuel injector time, battery voltage. If you want just one of these items, there's probably a simpler/cheaper way (eg; an electronic thermometer from e-bay). Once you start to want more it becomes viable to build an OBD unit.

Lots of other info is available, but not fuel tank level, so I had to build my own interface for that.



Gonzo
 

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Nice work! Doesn't look friendly for direct sunlight nor precipitation making it not good 90% of the time here. Also theft and curb appeal are compromised. If it is always garaged and only taken out on nice days it would be acceptable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very nice. What did that cost. Just curious, but what do you do for a living? :)
There's probably about $A200 worth of hardware. Fortunately I'm retired, so I don't have to cost my time! Computing is a hobby. I'm a mech engineer.

Gonzo
 

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Very, very interesting.
On second thought does CTX have a OBD port similar to car? If not I would like to tap the IO and install one. There are BT OBD modules which are so cheap now days.
If I plug that in then I can use any android device with a app, which shows all these data.
 

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Now THAT is AWESOME! Ben, you are a true wizard!

I love the fuel left and distance to empty - VERY handy! Now if they were just in usable units like miles and gallons rather than those weird SI things... :D

Kudos man, truly amazing!
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Very, very interesting.
On second thought does CTX have a OBD port similar to car? If not I would like to tap the IO and install one. There are BT OBD modules which are so cheap now days.
If I plug that in then I can use any android device with a app, which shows all these data.
The Honda OBD is different to the auto OBD-II protocols. I tried using an ELM327 based unit. It almost works, but after much experimentation I worked out that it calculates the checksums differently. Essentially you have to build your own using an arduino or PC. The non-standard 10400 baud rate makes it difficult.

Gonzo
 

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Yes, you saw it here first.

A Raspberry-Pi powered CTX700.

Here is the display:



It shows:
Gear position (currently "-" because the bike's not moving)
K/L-I - km per litre instantaneous
K/L-A - km per litre average
Fuel - left in the tank (litres)
DTE - distance to empty
Engine Temp - the coolant temp (degC)
Air Temp - the manifold air temp (degC)
Voltage
Fuel Sensor - the time for the capacitor to discharge through the tank level resistor (I need that for calibrating the tank)
Oiler - the percentage of the chain oiler cycle
Injector - fuel injector reading
Comms - number of comms errors

The display (a Medion smartphone) updates every 5 secs

The computer looks like this:



It's a Raspberry-Pi B+ with
>PiFace digital I/O
>FTDI USB Serial dongle
>a self-made interface board to the OBD connector
>a self-made interface board to the tank sensor
>a WIFI adapter to enable the display to connect.

The R-Pi interrogates the ECU about once a second. It also runs the chain oiler program, which, because it now has access to the speed of the bike, doesn't oil when the bike is stopped, and oils more when it's going fast.

Cool eh?

Yes, I'm a nerd

Gonzo

PS. I wish to acknowledge all the assistance I got from the guys on forum.pgmfi.org . Finding the data locations and Honda protocols would have been impossible without their help. Thanks guys.
This is the most impressive display of nerdistry to date, i'm sure you'd find some willing buyers if you wanted to sell this stuff as kits or something. :D
 

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You have got to be kidding! What a great project!

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
@JH700CTX: Kits? Forget it. The real reason for doing the project was not because there was a need, it was the journey, the mental challenge. Of course, now I have it, I wouldn't be without it. I'm happy to share the info if anyone wants to do their own.
@twnth: Thank you for the "nerdistry" tag! It would need some serious miniaturisation to fit under the seat. You could make it thinner by not using the PiFace Digital I/O card, but you'd need external relays, and you'd have to interface with the GPIO pins @ 3.3V. You could always make it in separate packages and mount them under the tupperware, but they'd have to be waterproof. The enclosure I've used is IP67.

Gonzo

oops. sorry I credited the "nerdistry" to the wrong member!
 

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And here's all the project documentation for anyone interested.

Gonzo
Would you be willing to share the code and other aspects of its creation? I consider myself a technical guy but long time ago I realized I was a complete dunce about coding stuff. Hardware I have some ability with.
 
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