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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I just joined mainly to lurk and to see if this CTX would be a good bike for my wife. I wanted to get her a new bike with ABS for our 32nd wedding anniversary. I have been riding for about 10 years now after a 20 year break. First bike was a 1960 Triumph Bonnie that I had for 1 day after I ended up in a goldfish pond. Then a Suzuki GS750 for a while in the 80's and then picked up the bug with a 1989 Pacific Coast about 10 years ago. The PC is the distinct forerunner of the CTX 700. It was an 800cc v-twin with huge storage and full weather protection. If you don't know the bike it's worth checking out.

I just "sat" my wife on this new CTX with Cycleergo and it said that her feet won't fit on the forward mounted pegs. I see this as an issue but maybe they will offer a mid set of pegs.

I hate the foot forward myself but do ride cruisers as I can flat foot them.

I see that a few variants of this platform offer mid foot controls but they have a 32" seat height.

This bike reminds me of the BMW F800 GT but a lot cheaper.

I would never buy a bike with out a test ride but some dealers will let you order and give a few days to try it out and you can get credit from them for another Honda.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

What a gentle men to consider such a nice gift for your wife. I was thinking about the foot reach issue already in my head since the pedals are in forward position. Well, don't lose hope yet maybe call up a honda dealership and organized a test ride or maybe just to sit on one with your wife.

The bmw F800 looks really similar especially the way the side fairing looks. The pedal position however is different.
 

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Welcome capt_t, You might want to look at another bike instead of the ctx700. I think for your wife's height it would be rather uncomfortable even if she just reach the pedal even at all. I'm not sure what I could recommend, I don't know any riders around that height.

The F800 i would consider more of a sport touring arguably lol I like it but why pay that price when you could get the CTx700.
 

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For your wife's height, I strongly recommend the Suzuki Burgman 400. It has a low 28 inch seat height and the center of gravity is very low. Huge storage (62 liters), so she can take the lunch along when you go off on rides. ;)

Yes, it is a "scooter", or what is commonly called a maxi-scooter. I've used one for commuting on I-5 in Seattle for over 76,000 miles. I also did an Iron Butt Assoc SS1000 ride on it last June. It took me a day or so to realize what was missing from that experience...the sore butt. The bike is a barcalounger compared to most motorcycles.

As long as you don't plan on riding over 100 mph, she should be able to keep up with you just fine.

The 2010 and later versions all have ABS. See if you can get a low-mileage previously loved one. The only difference in them is the color and the depreciation cost you'll eat by buying a new one.

Chris
 

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Hi, I'm 5'4 and a have a Suzuki boulevard s40. Its a 650 engine, enough power for me and too keep up with all the guys :). Yes its a manual bike but its nice and the power is great. I also want to get the CTX700, hopefully I can reach the pedal. Tired of the shifting! I'm also looking into getting a boot with a bigger sole, maybe add an inch or two onto my height. Just a thought!
 

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I'm 5'2 woman rider and have ridden a Suzuki Burgman 400 for 5 years, both daily commuting, weekend group rides and touring (CA to Sturgis). I love my bike. But I'd like another option other than the standard "cruiser" or having to add a ton of after market mods to try and get another bike (like the NC700 or VStrom) to sit low enough. The CTX has what I'm looking for in a new bike. But I'm also a bit concerned about the peg placement.
I would suggest having your wife sit on both the Burgman and the CTX and see which one feels most comfortable. Often what is comfortable to one person isn't necessarily the same for another.

And who knows, if there are enough people that have to opt out of purchasing one due to the pegs, Honda or an aftermarket company may actually give us an option. *fingers crossed*

What I wouldn't give to have a 30" inseam... lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
CTX-no good for shorter persons-A Honda screw up

What the **** is Honda doing with this CtX. I think it's going to be a dud. Low enough seat height but yes the pegs are waaaaay took far forward. The other Honda's like the Stateline, Fury and Interstate are way too long and teeny tanks make them not real serious bikes for touring. Good for bar hopping I guess. Our rides are often 300 miles.

Scooters-not for her. She looked at the Burgman and said she would not be caught seen on one. Not to disparage scooters they are pretty cool. I was just rolling along about 75 and see a rapidly approaching headlight. Our group got passed by a Burgman going over 100mph and it was amazing to see that thing blaze by us.

We went to the BMW dealer and test sat on the F800ST and GT. They were too tall for me with a 30" inseam.
Very nice bikes but too expensive.

My wife is a pretty strong rider and has now about 10,000 miles. She had a Suzuki S40 for exactly 3 days. It was her first bike and she hated it after the first day. Not enough power for Turnpike riding which down here in Florida is often over 80 mph in the left lane, which I think is the safest place to cruise. She has a Suzuki Boulevard S50 now which has a lot more power than the S40 and a very low seat height. She also has a Mustang "notch" seat that gets it down even lower. Combined with mid pegs she loves the bike. But she wants ABS. She has test sat on the Harley 883 and it fits her. Me being a Harley Hater-engines suck but that said the 883 and 1200 have rock solid engines compared to the rest of the HD's.

I had high hopes for the CTX. My friend Chris is 6'3" and tried the CTX and it was too low for him. I would like to see this bike released with mid controls. The Sportsters come in both flavors. Mid and forward controls.

As far as automatic shifting goes, I hate it in my cars and my bikes. Just learn to shift. When I was a kid automatic cars were the exception not the rule. Now it's very hard to find a stick shift.

I would not reccommend that any new rider purchase a non ABS bike. Most experienced riders should already know that it makes a bike much safer no matter how experienced you think you are you can't brake better than ABS.

My Triumph Thunderbird 1600 has it and it's saved my bacon on wet streets a few times. Although that is an 800 lb bike I can flat foot it with my wife and full load so low seat height is the answer to riding a bigger bike. I love the Triumph as it's is very smooth and has a nice "cool" factor that Harleys don't. Also get over 50 mpg and has a 6 gallon tank and is very fast. :)

I have been working for a few months overseas and not had internet so back to this forum after a break. Thanks for the replys.
 

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But she wants ABS.
Does it have to be a cruiser?

The new Honda CB500F has a fairly upright riding position, and the seat height isn't too bad at 30.9", alas, for someone that's only 5'3", I don't know. She'd have to sit on it as the seat height alone is just half the story. Seat width/shape has a lot to do with being able to reach the ground as well. The ABS version retails for $6K.
 

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I keep hearing that the front controls may be too far. I have a 28 inch inseam and find they are ok for me. As far as the 700 platform goes I think it is smooth and peppy and easy on gas. It is a motorcycle not a scooter for those tried and true motorcycle riders who would not get caught dead on a scooter (there are some). Scooters have many advantages in their design for storage and drive systems and the larger scooters perform and last as well as many motorcycles of the same size. Now back to the 700 bikes. Yes the CTX has variety but not in peg placement. I doubt that they will do what Harley has done and over mid or forward control. You want mid controls get the NC700x. Oh, too tall you say. For about 100.00 you can lower it. A little more if a dealer does it. The NC700X forum has many riders who have done that and love the bike. Check into it. If you lived in Canada they have already lowered the NC700X and call it the NC700S which we cant get here in the USA. Lowering a bike costs extra but it is not as expensive on these models as the rear shock has 2 dog bone shaped rods on each side that if you get different length rods the height will be changed. Check Ebay, they sell em there. So you have more choices than a dealer may let onto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good ideas Bill,

I just checked out the NC700S and the NC700S they both are too tall on Cycle-ergo but were going to have a look at them if we can at Rick Case Honda. You have had some very cool bikes for sure. How do you rate the CTX for Turnpike running. Does it have enough grunt for Turnpike running? How does it feel at 75 mph? Enough fairing and wind protection for you.

Any other suggestions for a low ABS bike are appreciated.

Also I am brain dead here. I did not realize that the CTX is chain driven. It's a deal breaker for me. I work full time as a mechanic and do not want to work on anything I don't have too. I just want to ride. Give me a shaft or a belt. I'm done with chains.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Victory Vegas !

I forgot one of the bikes that fit her really well was the Victory Vegas with a 106 cu in engine-1700cc. Unfortunately no ABS so it got scratched.

I'm really holding out for ABS

I highly suggest the Suzuki S50 Boulevard or the older VS800 for shorter riders that want a good low bike. It's shaft drive, water cooled and very cool looking.

The Mustang squareback seat lowers the bike about 1.5 inches. I can barely fit on it as it's so low.
 

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What the **** is Honda doing with this CtX. I think it's going to be a dud. Low enough seat height but yes the pegs are waaaaay took far forward.
Okay, since this is a CTX700 forum, I believe it's time to defend the bike.

I understand the personal dilemma as far as your wife is concerned looking for the right fit with ABS, but I know for many, many maxi scooter owners and former owners, like myself; aging bike owners who are looking for a lower-slung ride and/or an automatic choice to help with disabilities; and for those considering bikes for the first time; this is the bike we've been waiting on. For me personally as a new rider with my 2013 scooter being the first and only ride I've ever had, this MC is what I wanted to begin with but wasn't available one year ago.

There will never be the perfect bike that will provide everything exactly as I'd like it, but this bike works for me for several reasons. Firstly, I need something with extreme durability with a fifty-five mile commute daily. I think this power train will allow for this durability requirement much better than my current, 330 cc scooter, because of the way it is geared and tuned and the fact that it uses a conventional transmission instead of a CVT. The latter requires periodic transmission component replacement. It'll turn very low RPM at highway speeds for a bike with a 700 cc engine. Secondly, it is a prerequisite for me that any ride I choose to own and ride to work and back must get 60+ mpg average all year long, because my 3200 lb car gets 45. This prerequisite really narrows down the choices out there, and the CTX700 is the only choice that I know of in a MC in a touring configuration that will keep up with highway traffic that will get 60+ mpg without hypermiling. There are smaller bikes of course, but then comfort, weather protection, and/or speed is limited and this is why many of those looking for practical choices end up as scooter owners. Thirdly, this bike puts the performance kick in the low and mid RPM range; more car-like performance, which is unlike most bikes out there, save the NC700X and a few other cruisers of other brands, but those other brands don't come close with respect to mpg, features, and/or price.

Of course there are many negatives about this bike as well, but one won't find a bike without negatives. As far as chain drive goes, I'm not finding a single shaft drive with real-world, 60+ mpg, and I'm not finding shaft drive out there under $9K for a new ride. With respect to belt drive, I've not researched it much, but it does seem as though this bike would be much less hassle with belt drive, so that seems to call some confusion as to why Honda didn't opt for a belt rather than a chain, especially since they are reaching out to the younger generation who will expect to just hop on and ride without any hassles. This bike requires a valve clearance check on every service interval (8,000 miles). That doesn't really match the market they are after either. And then there is the biggest drawback for me, and that's the fuel capacity. They've traded the possibility of almost 300 mile range for a small cubby that will give a very small storage area for glasses or summer gloves or a wallet. That doesn't make sense for a touring bike. Maybe if they had offered this storage in the N version and traded it for more gasoline capacity in the fairing version, this would have made more sense, since the fairing version is billed as a touring bike.

Lots and lots of buzz about this bike on scooter forums for riders who need or want interstate capability, great mpg, something easy to ride, and something that finally makes sense from a practicality standpoint that is not a scooter. Of course the NC700X also meets these criteria, but for many of us, the adventure styling doesn't work either as a matter of seat height or just not preferred with regards to styling.

I think feet forward is a matter of preference for many riders. As far as cruising speed, I think it's been well documented on the NC700X forum that this power train will allow for 80 mph all day long, however, it's probably not going to give quick, over-taking power above 75 mph as other bikes of this cc range due to the fact that it has a low rev limit.

This bike works for many people who would otherwise stay out of the motorcycle market. Of course the perfect inseam for the manual version is a little longer than for the automatic, because with the automatic, all one has to do is reach the pegs. If Honda had chosen to bring the pegs rearward a little more then that would have made the ride more scrunched up for the average rider. I recently rode a Yamaha cruiser that was scrunched in this way, and it was uncomfortable for me and put more pressure on my lumbar. I think where they placed the pegs, considering the seat height is a good compromise. For me personally, they could have had the seat about an inch taller and then they my feet would be slightly more downward and not so forward, but they have to build bikes that will work for as many folks as possible.

I don't believe that Honda set out to create a cruiser, it's just that when you lower the seat so far, the pegs can't go straight down anymore as they would be to close to the ground; so the only place to go is forward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
CTX vs other bikes

This is the value of forums and your post really opened up my eyes to the bikes faults. That valve adjustment is a real PIA for folks who rack up miles. Along with a Chain lube and clean every 500 (is that right) might make the cost of ownership steep for first time riders.



As far as cruisers with fairly upright positions and good mileage (at least 50 or more on regular) I have owned both the Shadow Aero 750 and the Vulcan 900 classic LT. I liked them both and of the 2 the Vulcan stands out as a very comfortable low seat height bike with many good features. I don't own a car and use the bike for shopping and doctors appointments. I'm 61 and have a replaced hip, hernia repair and bad knees so can relate to what some "older" riders are going through. I just sold my 08 Vulcan loaded for 4500 with 7000 miles on it. I got around 50 mpg and it has a 5.5 gallon tank so great range. I put on a Scootworks pulley and it was very smooth at 70 mph. It's got a belt drive. The Vulcan has hydraulic lifters so never needs a valve adjustment. With a big windshield and crash bar chaps it was fairly water proof when moving. It looks just like a Harley Softtail with a hidden monoshock and is a nice comfortable ride. Plenty of power for one up.

For some people the forward pegs are just too far away from the ends of their feet to allow the bike to be shifted or use the foot break. Yes if your tall you need some where for you feet to go. So you raise the seat height and now you can't put your feet on the ground. Some bikes have this balance just right and the only way is to test ride for sure.

Perhaps the answer will come via aftermarket with a mid controls kit. The Triumph America, a low slung version of the Bonneville comes with foot forward controls but there are after market kits to move the shift and brake back.

I'm looking forward to my test ride on the CTX hopefully this weekend and I will talk to the service dept at the dealer ship to get a handle on the valve adjustment.

My current bike is a horror-eats rear tires every 6000 miles and needs a very expensive valve job (1000 at the stealer) every 12000 or at least a check. I did not check this out prior so I'm paying for it now. I'm sure most folks don't care at first about the valve job or chain stuff especially first time riders.
 

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My current bike is a horror-eats rear tires every 6000 miles and needs a very expensive valve job (1000 at the stealer) every 12000 or at least a check. I did not check this out prior so I'm paying for it now. I'm sure most folks don't care at first about the valve job or chain stuff especially first time riders.
Good luck finding the best fit for her and something you can both live with. There is going to be good and bad points on all of them, and it just comes down to what is important to you and her.

Great mpg, good fit, good weather protection for all-season riding, durability, and hassle-free riding are important to me. This power train has been returning real-world, 70+ mpg with NC700X riders riding conservatively on the highway. It fits me just right, and the fairing should help in the protection department with the taller screen. Hassle free is the one thing this bike is not going to be, but there are worse choices out there. We won't know about tires, but I hope a good tire will last 10K plus. Another plus for me is the low RPM it turns on the highway. I think that will make it a smooth highway runner; more like a larger cc bike.

I'll be a first-time MC owner and I don't think that either the chain maintenance or the vlave adjustment is going to be a show stopper for me, even though the valve check did cause me pause for a little bit. I learned, for instance that the CB500X requires valve check only every 16,000 miles and considered it for a time, but, when I looked into it more closely, I found that it requires a check at only the 600 mile mark and then it goes to the 16,000 mile check, and then I further learned that the 500 power train is a new-type of valve design and would definitely require adjustment by the shop, whereas, the 700 is pretty straight forward and I will be able to do it myself with just a few tools and a couple of hours after the first time or two of getting used to the procedure.

As far as the chain goes, it's pretty much what I expected for a chain drive. It's just something I'll have to get good and quick at if I want that bike and lots of other, entry-level bikes have chains as well. For instance, I was looking at the Shadow, and the only one that has a seat height above 26" is chain driven, and it was the only one I'd have, because the others were too extreme on the seat height for my tastes.

We've learned alot about the valve job on this forum. It does not use shims for adjustment, so that simplifies things somewhat. Another member has researched and found that one basically has to remove the gas tank and drop down the radiator to get to the valve cover and have room to work. I think the NC700X is even easier, because it doesn't require gas tank removal since the gas tank is more rearward on the NC, but with the CTX, it has been described on here (extrapolated from the workshop manual), and I believe I remember that it has to be removed.
 

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Hey Cap_t, you can not make the CTX what it is not. Have your wife set on a Harley sportster 883 Iron. Low seat, belt drive, hydraulic valves (no adjusting) and stick a rack behind the solo seat and pick any of many windshields for it that suits her and be done. The low seat and wide bars makes the weight of it not so bad. About 9995.00 out the door. Get her the 1200 version if she wants more power.

I got my service manual for my CTX and plan to do my valves. Unlike your bike I will do it myself and save that 1000.00 you said yours costs (I traded a VFR where valve adjustment was 8 hours labor). I figure I will ride about 8k a year so one Saturday a year to do maintenance seems like no big deal to me. Everyone knows bikes take more care than cars and few models have long maintenance intervals. Just comes with the territory. You mention the Victory. That is a big bike for most women and nothing like a CTX. Make a check list of things you like and don't like, visit more dealers and have her sit on them. In the end the one with the most check marks should be the one you buy.


One more thing, I bought 16 used bikes since 2009 searching for my ideal bike. Maybe try that till you get what she likes, buy right sell right and you break even in your testing. I am 200.00 up after 16 bikes.

Never found my perfect bike except a close 1988 Honda model. 88 was just too old. so bought a CTX this month. Sure I have had more power, Less maintenance, better brakes, and on and on. I wear 28 length jeans, I have not problem with the bike fitting me. I rode 60 miles on the free way at a steady 72mph and not even hitting 4k on the tach. So for now I am a happy camper. Keep looking and she will be too. Her choice may not be your choice. You may have to live with that if in fact you say this bike will be hers. Good luck.
 

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Another member has researched and found that one basically has to remove the gas tank and drop down the radiator to get to the valve cover and have room to work. I think the NC700X is even easier, because it doesn't require gas tank removal since the gas tank is more rearward on the NC, but with the CTX, it has been described on here (extrapolated from the workshop manual), and I believe I remember that it has to be removed.
Just for clarification, as I'm the one who posted the valve adjustment steps... it does not require gas tank removal, to get to the valves. The tupperware needs to be removed, and the radiator needs to be dropped (lowered, not drained and removed), but the gas tank isn't affected by the procedure.
 

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Just for clarification, as I'm the one who posted the valve adjustment steps... it does not require gas tank removal, to get to the valves. The tupperware needs to be removed, and the radiator needs to be dropped (lowered, not drained and removed), but the gas tank isn't affected by the procedure.
no that comes later when it is time to replace the air cleaner......lol I will be doing that one my self too.
 

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I just "sat" my wife on this new CTX with Cycleergo and it said that her feet won't fit on the forward mounted pegs. I see this as an issue but maybe they will offer a mid set of pegs.
Wow, you were not kidding. I just got back from the dealer. The foot forward setup of the CTX was really uncomfortable for me. I was barely reaching the pegs. I had to slide my butt all the way forward to reach them, but then trying to operate the pegs, I felt like I couldn't exert proper force on them and was sliding back on the seat. The CTX is out of the running for me. I loved the smoothness of the engine though.

I also test rode the CB500X and CBR500R. The X just felt too tall. Maybe I could get used to it, but I'm not all too convinced after this ride. Out of the three bikes I rode, I actually liked the R the most. The seat was lower than the X, and the fairing was actually nice. The R looks really slick in black. Sadly, the ABS version of the R does not come in black. :(

Neither of the three bikes felt as comfortable as my old Vulcan 500, so for now I think my search continues.

Also, not happy with all the extra BS fees that the dealer wanted... roughly $1000 in various freight, delivery, and paperwork fees. Is this normal nowadays?
 

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Hey Pete, don't give up on the CTX too soon. It has more potential than all those others you mentioned put together. Sight unseen, I've still got intentions of bringing the pegs back a little and getting the rear brake up to the left bar (using all Honda parts) Even though I've got a height problem, the seat will get a sheepskin cover to lift it a tad, until Corbin comes up with something to my liking.

More importantly, I'll be removing the passenger pegs and replacing them with boards an inch or more lower. I predict the CTX will be around a long time and the first offering will be highly sought-after later on. That's why anything I do, will be easily reversible.
 
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