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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All, I'm a new member but don't have a bike yet. 99% sure I'm buying a CTX 700 but not sure when. Trying to understand market differences. Still going a bit back and forth on the manual versus DCT. This forum has already been very helpful and all of your inputs are appreciated. Thanks in advance for your time. HP
 

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DCT is the only reason why my wife even rides (and why she stole the first bike and I had to buy a second one)....she only has to concentrate on traffic while letting the bike do what it is supposed to do.
 

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Welcome! Good luck with your search. I am partial to the DCT myself. Greatest thing since electric starters :)
 
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I'm with Tony. I would neverv try to influence your decision one-way or the other but I would urge you to fully evaluate the DCT option. There are some shortcomings. But, those are greatly offset by the gains. More focused riding, less fatigue on trips of any length, I feel it is safer too. I would probably never go back.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm with Tony. I would neverv try to influence your decision one-way or the other but I would urge you to fully evaluate the DCT option. There are some shortcomings. But, those are greatly offset by the gains. More focused riding, less fatigue on trips of any length, I feel it is safer too. I would probably never go back.
Thanks MZ. I actually quite open to your influence. You are confirming my thinking. Curious, what are your top three "shortcomings"? Thanks for your time. HP
 

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My normal ride is a 98 Honda Valkyrie (GL1500). I have had my daughter's new-to-her bike (14 CTX700 DCT) for about 6 weeks now. Some things I've noticed that might be called shortcomings with the DCT:
  • in D mode (as opposed to sport) the transmission seems to shift up to a higher gear (and downshift later) than it should. It gets just to the point of chugging at times. It is hauling around my 260 lb carcass, so I'm sure that wasn't the weight the engineers were tuning the transmission for, but S or manual mode is the only mode I would ride it in.
  • You don't have a clutch to feather during certain maneuvers, like a U turn.
  • I'm sure if it breaks, it is more expensive to fix, but that isn't a big worry. Neither is the transmission oil filter. A bit more work and expense, but no big deal.
All in all, an enjoyable bike and I'm sure she'll love it, but I'll keep my Valk. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My normal ride is a 98 Honda Valkyrie (GL1500). I have had my daughter's new-to-her bike (14 CTX700 DCT) for about 6 weeks now. Some things I've noticed that might be called shortcomings with the DCT:
  • in D mode (as opposed to sport) the transmission seems to shift up to a higher gear (and downshift later) than it should. It gets just to the point of chugging at times. It is hauling around my 260 lb carcass, so I'm sure that wasn't the weight the engineers were tuning the transmission for, but S or manual mode is the only mode I would ride it in.
  • You don't have a clutch to feather during certain maneuvers, like a U turn.
  • I'm sure if it breaks, it is more expensive to fix, but that isn't a big worry. Neither is the transmission oil filter. A bit more work and expense, but no big deal.
All in all, an enjoyable bike and I'm sure she'll love it, but I'll keep my Valk. :)
Awesome. Thank you. HP
 

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Thanks MZ. I actually quite open to your influence. You are confirming my thinking. Curious, what are your top three "shortcomings"? Thanks for your time. HP
Like Sdv003 said, low speed handling and the lack of a clutch based Friction zone is the biggest shortcoming. But you learn to use the rear brake so you need some parking lot time to adapt. Though my riding style does not make this dangerous, sometimes I would choose a different gear than the computer did into corners. But you can use the paddle shifters to mitigate. It does add 30 Lbs., more or less.

I truly believe the biggest obstacle to wider adoption of DCT is rider/owners. There seems to be an opinion that there is a correlation between the enjoyment one experiences while motorcycling and the simultaneous operation of a manual transmission. That may be true for some. Technically, DCT is neither better nor worse than manual. It is just different. Emotionally (arquably irrationally), I find it superior overall to manual. If more would accept that DCT just provides a unique riding experience it would grow. Honda did a great job communicating this on the latest Goldwing. They now manufacture and deliver over 50% of that model with DCT.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Like Sdv003 said, low speed handling and the lack of a clutch based Friction zone is the biggest shortcoming. But you learn to use the rear brake so you need some parking lot time to adapt. Though my riding style does not make this dangerous, sometimes I would choose a different gear than the computer did into corners. But you can use the paddle shifters to mitigate. It does add 30 Lbs., more or less.

I truly believe the biggest obstacle to wider adoption of DCT is rider/owners. There seems to be an opinion that there is a correlation between the enjoyment one experiences while motorcycling and the simultaneous operation of a manual transmission. That may be true for some. Technically, DCT is neither better nor worse than manual. It is just different. Emotionally (arquably irrationally), I find it superior overall to manual. If more would accept that DCT just provides a unique riding experience it would grow. Honda did a great job communicating this on the latest Goldwing. They now manufacture and deliver over 50% of that model with DCT.
Thank you. HP
 

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There seems to be an opinion that there is a correlation between the enjoyment one experiences while motorcycling and the simultaneous operation of a manual transmission. That may be true for some. Technically, DCT is neither better nor worse than manual. It is just different. Emotionally (arquably irrationally), I find it superior overall to manual.
Exactly. My riding buddy insists that shifting manually is essential to his riding enjoyment. He would never purchase a DCT. To me, however, manual shifting is over-rated. I'm fine with an automatic both in my car and my bike. I think it gives you more freedom to concentrate on other things like safety... and enjoying the view.
 

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Had I personally gone with a manual I probably would of done an electronic shifter at minimum. I hate dealing with clutch and everything else while im trying to enjoy my ride and do it safely. I learned enough in msf to pass but I still was glad I went with the dct.
 

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Hi HondaPete,

Welcome to the forum, I am another new rider and did exactly what you did. I passed the MSF safety class and got my motorcycle license. I practiced on a friends old Kawasaki for first 2 months and was struggling with getting comfortable with down shifting in traffic and safety. At the rate I was going it would have taken a long time for me to master the clutch and feel safe.

My husband bought me a 1978 Honda Hawk automatic motorcycle - no clutch and it instantly transformed my enjoyment and ramp up on my riding skills. I was able to focus on safety and got much more comfortable handling the automatic bike. It greatly accelerated my ability to get on the road and enjoys riding. I recently joined this CTX700 Forum as I was able to upgrade from my Hawk Hondamatic to my CTX700 DCT.

I love this bike, the CTX700 DCT technology is amazing for a rider like me - who just started riding later in life and just wants to get on the road on the weekend and enjoy riding with my family. My husband, son, daughter-in-law and I all ride now! It is a great way to social distance and enjoy family time too..

Gotta love a Honda,,hope you are enjoying your bike as much as I am,,

Cheers,
Lisa
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi HondaPete,

Welcome to the forum, I am another new rider and did exactly what you did. I passed the MSF safety class and got my motorcycle license. I practiced on a friends old Kawasaki for first 2 months and was struggling with getting comfortable with down shifting in traffic and safety. At the rate I was going it would have taken a long time for me to master the clutch and feel safe.

My husband bought me a 1978 Honda Hawk automatic motorcycle - no clutch and it instantly transformed my enjoyment and ramp up on my riding skills. I was able to focus on safety and got much more comfortable handling the automatic bike. It greatly accelerated my ability to get on the road and enjoys riding. I recently joined this CTX700 Forum as I was able to upgrade from my Hawk Hondamatic to my CTX700 DCT.

I love this bike, the CTX700 DCT technology is amazing for a rider like me - who just started riding later in life and just wants to get on the road on the weekend and enjoy riding with my family. My husband, son, daughter-in-law and I all ride now! It is a great way to social distance and enjoy family time too..

Gotta love a Honda,,hope you are enjoying your bike as much as I am,,

Cheers,
Lisa
Awesome. Thank you Lisa. I'm hoping to complete my purchase this week. Stay safe and thanks for the comments. HP
 

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Good luck with your purchase, I would move fast as it is getting harder to find a good used CTX 700 DCT with low mileage and that hasn't been dropped. I also noticed the increase in price from the time I started my search and I did miss out on a few bikes as they were selling even before the listings came out on Cycletrader. I ended buying my bike out of state from Ace Cycle Center in Colorado and they were amazing. Sold be an excellent bike, frictionless transaction great sales folks to deal with.
 

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Hi HP and welcome.

Selecting a bike is a very personal choice, and all of us here have or have a connection to the CTX. In Canada, there are very limited DCT models. While I would be interested in trying one out, I am very happy with my manual bike: it works for me. I was in my early 40's when I took a course. I always knew about the hand clutch, but did not know how geas were shifted. All was presented to me, I passed the course and was intriqued. Bought a 2001 Vulcan 500 with tempermental carbs that did not like cool weather (it's a pain when you want to ride on a sunny day but is -5 C and the bike doesn't want to start..).

If you don't have any physical limitations (some people with small hands have a problem with the reach for the clutch) you will be good with either. Let us know what you get and tell us all about the new bike.
 
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