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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey all! new member here, from lovely seattle, washington.

i just purchased a ctx700d after trading in a perfectly great bv 350. why did i do that? petty reasons: i wanted abs (gasp), i wanted something a bit more comfortable for touring/commuting, and i wanted a bit more juice for the highway hauling.



apologies for the horrible picture! it's evening here. i'll post nicer ones later. i got my bike from the kind gents at ride motorsports in woodinville, who agreeably enable my fiscal imprudence. my other ride is a '13 suzuki sfv 650 (nee gladius) which i've put about 2K miles on in the last two months. it is a painful, terrible touring bike, but it is a absolute rip on the backroads of seattle and the eastside. i adore it.

the ctx700d is a different beast. i put about 5K on an aprilia mana for two years, and for performance, the mana smokes the ctx. however, the mana was a top-heavy, ungainly 550 lb (wet) beast that did not like the narrow parade speed dancing on seattle's hills, and it took a nasty drop. i've also rocked a cbr250, and aprilia sportcity 250, and a honda sh150i prior, and my wife has a cute little pcx 150 (and zero interest in upgrading it). needless to say, i have ptw problem, and i hope this signals some peace to my wallet for awhile.

to provide some useful content, i'm of mixed feelings on the ctx700. first, it's ugly, but since i wanted to tour a bit along with my slab commutes, i needed a fairing -- and that ruled out the prettier naked edition. (besides, if i wanna look cool, i'll roll out on the zook.) the dct is a strange beast, as the audible shifting clunks seem very alien initially (i keep suffering from a phantom clutch grab, too), especially after my time on the mana. the forward controls seem comfortable, albeit totally unnatural. i built my skills, such as they are, three years ago on a cbr250 and then on the mana, and my preference is for mid controls.

the "meh" aside, here's the good: it has really solid power delivery, it handles like a dream with that low center of gravity, the front brake has good bite despite the single disc (i don't use the rear much and never have), the paddle shift is fun for aggressive engine brake engagement, the abs is solid, and THE SEAT IS SO. ****. COMFORTABLE. i'm not even 40 yet, and still, if this is just a taste of a goldwing, i know where my sad, sad motorcycle future lies, and it ain't on an inline 4. (there may be a ducati diavel en route, though.)

i put about 120 miles on it today, breaking the seal on the tires, and ranged through heavy traffic to mild rain to some pleasant sweepers out by duvall to slab shenanigans at 80+ mph, and it was as easy as riding the bv 350. (by the way, the bv 350 *is* an awesome scooter. i'm still a LITTLE baffled that i decided to trade it in, but a few near rainslick slideouts made me decide i want abs. that, and the desire to tour with some buddies in late august.)

anyway, glad to join! when i get some more time in the saddle, i'll write up a comparison to the aprilia mana 850 gt. (happy to compare it to the sfv 650, too, but they really aren't comparable. the sfv 650 is called a beginner's bike as well, so i guess that's something, but i still can't fathom why beyond the nice broad friction zone and the low-ish seat.) oh, and if it helps: i'm 5'11" and 185 lbs.

also! are there any standard cheap (read: non oem) saddle bags or top case kits for this, like from givi or shad? the oem prices are APPALLING.

castellan
 

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hey all! new member here, from lovely seattle, washington.

i just purchased a ctx700d after trading in a perfectly great bv 350.

(by the way, the bv 350 *is* an awesome scooter. i'm still a LITTLE baffled that i decided to trade it in
castellan

Hi Castellan and welcome to the forum. We're sort of in the same club.

My thirteen-month-old BV350 is sitting at a dealership in Chattanooga awaiting a new CTX700 in red, standard.

Unlike your experiences, the BV350 is my first and only ride, but like you, I agree that it is a fantastic choice in powered two wheel transportation. Lots of acceleration; plenty of top speed for almost any situation; easy and fun to ride in the city or highway; long service intervals; best features and storage in its class; and good mpg. Even though I have limited experience with other rides, I just can't think of hardly anything bad about the BV other than, like other scooters, it uses a CVT for a transmission, which have alot of wearable parts for folks putting alot of miles per year on his or her ride or for strictly highway riding. This describes my use: a daily 55-mile per day commute.

When I first saw the CTX700: the specs, the price, and the mpg riders of the NC700X were reporting, I just had to make the switch.

I've had lots of trouble here in Tennessee getting anyone to take interest in the BV. Could have sold it back in June for $4,000 but held out because I thought I might be able to get that much in a trade and save a little in taxes. Took it to a couple of dealers last month and got offered $3K and $3,500 with two different dealers respectively. I've not had a serious inquiry in a month. Had one person offer $3,200 and then reoffered $3,500 when I declined. I asked him to quit offering me trade value and below when I already had $3740 coming to me from the dealer with no hassle and risk of a private sale. I guess I'm going to trade it at a huge loss. I don't quite get it. When I bought it, it was a hot scooter and folks on forums were waiting around for used ones to come up for sale. Not sure what's happened in this market, but I couldn't get it sold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
this bike is amazing for commute comfort. the bv was good, but winds were still a bit problematic on it. slab winds just bounce off this bad boy.

got no love in the parking lot at work this mornng. :-( my gs and harley riding pals came out to eye it over and pronounced it "hideous". "what is it with you and girl's rides?" i was asked by my office neighbor (the scooters, the mana, and the sfv are all considered girl rides. funny, too, because most of the girls in our riding group rock midsize harleys, two run triumph daytona 675s, and one -- our building's front desk gal -- rides a heavily farkled 'busa!). i blame the press for their dismissive attitude toward bikes with low seat heights (i like being able to plant feet in queen anne hill stop/go), automatic options and scooters (do journalists ever do a REAL downtown commute?), and anything that doesn't have the fueling response of a wolverine on crack -- or is 800 pounds of chrome and torque. ah well, this *is* an image hobby!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
also did the commute today with some moderate rain and a lot of oil on the road. as a sort of control, i dropped it into the low torque, super short shifting "d" mode.

first, if you demo a dct bike, make SURE it is in "s" mode. "d" mode feels like juddery, no-power gutless blech. even with the wet, oily roads, i found myself thumbing the gear down 2 on the regular just to get a little torque and acceleration. "s" mode is way peppier and has shift points that correspond to the way an experienced rider would shift, instead of this gas- and power-conserving short shift nonsense.

(the mana had 3 virtual gearing setups, with sport actually being almost TOO aggressive for commuting, the touring mode having a steady power curve, and the rain mode being kinda useless.)

while riding, i really began wondering if this bike, like the mana, is actually a "newbie" bike. really, like the mana, it has a setup, weight, and geometry that are more suited to experienced riders. this is a great step up for someone with a couple thousand scooter or bike miles under their belt, with or without the dct, but if you haven't built in the basic leaning/counterweighting/countersteering skills, this bike could still get a newb into trouble at low speeds -- it's still not a bike that lets you use your body skills to recover, like a light 250cc or scooter would. i'm still of the mindset that newbie bikes are 250cc and under, that allow the as-yet inexperienced or uncoordinated to easily recover from mistakes by planting feet or walking the bike around easily until they get their "road legs" as it were. the ctx700 isn't light and if you're a chronic duckwalker or have yet to really absorb the basics of riding, it could prove a bit feisty. i've observed that there are "bikes for newbies" vs. "bikes newbies can ride". this bike, like a sportster or a cb500 or a vulcan 900, is one of the latter -- it doesn't pour on the power with a throttle crack, it has gentle braking and an engine that doesn't need heavy clutch work or rev management (i am assuming), and low speed fueling isn't a concern. however, it is still heavy, prefers thoughtful smooth inputs, and has enough juice on tap to startle riders who have yet to understand how to ride to the current road conditions. just a thought!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
oh, almost forgot! i looped the ctx700 through some ratty, wet cobblestone paths on campus here to test out the abs. (my machine was not among the recalled, by the by, with a 5/13 [japan] manufacturing date.) i did three panic stops at 25-35 mph, with one in a light curve, and the abs did NOT get confused and modulated the stop PERFECTLY. thumbs up, japanese engineering! (i was really surprised, because the bricks and cobbles are nasty and uneven and slick as heck. i was actually taking a little risk on the last one in the curve, but the abs engagement was perfect on the other two panic stops, and i felt good about it. hooray, honda!)
 

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Great review of the abs!! Welcome to the forum.
I was riding in rush hour and could not believe the amount of texting drivers!!! Texas needs to ban that. I was glad to have the ABS!!
Stay Safe out there.
 

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Great review of the abs!! Welcome to the forum.
I was riding in rush hour and could not believe the amount of texting drivers!!! Texas needs to ban that. I was glad to have the ABS!!
Stay Safe out there.
California banned it but everyone still does it. Gotta keep eyes open and anticipate the unexpected for sure.
 

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slightly better pic post-lunch

Castellan, welcome to the forum.

Great to hear you thoughts on rainy day riding with ABS. ABS is a good choice for your climate for sure.

Harley riders can sometimes be very clique minded but I ignore that and they put up with me tagging along. Its always fun to get in front of some on the twisties and then they notice the CTX has some abilities they don't.


Rubber side down.
 
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Good info on comparing to the BV for highway comfort and wind dynamics. On the Vespa forum it was often mentioned by more experienced riders that it was a little loud and windy compared to some other scooters and bikes. For me, it was hard to understand, since it was the only ride I had ridden on a regular basis.

I'm getting anxious about wanting to hurry up and take delivery on my new ride. It should be a week to ten days before I'll have it at home.

Sounds like some of your coworkers have some insecurity in their masculinity. Mark Twain stated that clothes make a man, but I don't believe a motorcycle makes a man. We choose what we want to ride and pretty much everyone on here, man or woman, believes the CTX700 is a good choice.

I agree about the texting, but that's just part of the problem and when the state laws are finally written and passed, I think they should not be so specific. It should be a law that drivers and riders pay full attention on the road whenever they are in traffic. Just yesterday a driver of a compact pickup began passing me on a four lane. Suddenly, he slowed to my speed and swerved partially in my lane. After he righted himself, I looked over as he began passing again, and he was moving a lighter away from his cigarette.

I think all distractions that take ones eyes down and require the use of one's hands away from the steering wheel are pretty much equal. And my big question is why would someone think it is okay to be in the middle of negotiating a pass on another vehicle and choose that moment to engage in another activity and momentarily quit driving, requiring other drivers to drive around them? And my second question would be, why is that legal?
 

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better pic, after installing the tourmaster saddlebags:

good capacity bags. do you think they will rub too much on the plastic cowl even if they have the foam side padding that goes against the bike. Do you loop the straps under the seat to secure them or over the seat.

good alternative. thanks for posting pic
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
over the seat. I woulda had to cut the fabric otherwise. no plastic rubbing that i can see, and install was painless. i'll post some closer up pics for inspection this evening.

the bags were 169 from the dealer and probably cheaper on the internets. the cortech v2 top bag, which i also have on my zook, was 129.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
took a spin out to neah bay this weekend, which is about 250 miles round trip. man, as ever, if you live in washington (state), biker ferry privileges rule. thoughts from the trip:

pros:
+ i could ride all day on this bad boy. i added a crampbuster (the small one) on friday and i hopped off the bike with nary an issue 125ish miles later.
+ got a couple compliments on it from the ferry biker crowd. one dude said it looked like "a baby goldwing". no real curiosity about the dct; rather, folks seemed to like the low seat, forward controls, and general friendliness of the bike's appearance.
+ d mode ain't so bad for long stretches of highway. it's like a semi cruise control for where i'd normally be flipping from 5th/6th on a shifty bike, when riding through some hilly areas.
+ clearance isn't bad at all! i hit the twisties by crescent lake kinda hard, cuz i forgot i wasn't on the zook or the bv, and i had an "oh ****" moment where i was SURE i'd scrape the peg, but nope! leaned right through it with room to spare. it REALLY loves sweepers. :-D did 'em all at 15 over :-D

cons:
- not that downtown friendly. it's my commuter now, but the brakes are too soft/weak for seattle's batshit stop/go. i hafta combine front/rear in situations that the zook or the mana would have required a tap of the front only. i'll adjust, but forward controls make this annoying. maybe if the rear brake wasn't so soft.
- it's a little bit of a pig for seattle's many "turn from a stop while uphill" situations. forward controls are not friendly for that, and neither s or d mode give me enough revs in first to do it like i'm used to, so i'm getting in the habit of switching to manual mode in town. still, a clutch with a friction zone is best here.
- the mana got me in the habit of using the e-brake when parked, but i still forget :-(
 

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Ok, this is my first post here. I just got my learner's permit, and am scheduled to take the Safety Training Course on the 24th and 25th. I have purchased a Honda PCX 150 as my first bike. I wanted something to commute to work and take the load off of my CRV that has 193k miles. The PCX is supposed to get high 90's on the mpg, and the cost plus ins. plus [email protected] will save me $30/mo from just gas in my 24mpg CRV. But I am new to riding. I cannot ride the PCX to work yet, since I work 2nd shift and cant drive at night. I have 2 small kids so cant get out much during the week either since the wife works 1st shift. I love the automatic option. I think I can manage the PCX- my whole route is mainly rural @ 55mph. But I think I have a crush on this CTX. It wouldnt be as good on gas as the PCX, but would be more stable in wind and passing traffic. Also, the ABS sounds gloriously safe, and it would be big enough for my wife and I to 2-up with her brother and Dad who ride Harleys. Money is tight right now, so not sure if I could swing the payments and the lesser gas mileage... Any thoughts from the wisdom of the forums? Thanks so much in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
my wife rocks a pcx 150, and i steal that bad boy whenever she isn't looking. it's a rip.

my advice would be to ride the pcx for a year and really develop a sense for street riding, and then get a ctx. the ctx may be an upgrade in power and speed, but it's a big downgrade in agility and won't be as easy for a n00b to recover from a mistake. pcx's keep their trade-in value -- they remain the #1 selling scoot. at the very least, wait until february to buy the ctx when dealers are desperate to clear out units (it's the non-riding season) and you'll get a much better price, and RIDE THE HOLY **** out of your pcx until then! (try to get at least 2K miles on it.)
 

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Hello From the Other Side of Town

Hey Castellan,

Hello from down the street! Enjoyed reading your posts, especially some of the details of your experience.

So you have some macho dudes in your group who think that you ride "girls" bikes? I have a couple of questions about this. When they walk do their knuckles drag on the ground? And I wonder what the female riders in your group would think about having a "girls" bike designation for your (or any) motorcycle.

Maybe you could show your knuckle-dragging friends this youtube video of a SCOOTER blowing away several motorcycles while speeding down a mountain road frequented by motorcycle enthusiasts.

*** Tony in Seattle
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
haha, awesome! i don't take 'em seriously, plus i could outrun or outfight any one of their flabby pirate butts any day of the week! it's just the usual buddy griefing. plus, one of the gals in the group rocks a fully farkled 'busa, and the way she rides it, she has ALL our balls on a rope!
 
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