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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The name is TN Willie and, as you may've guessed, I hail from the Volunteer State. I've been giving serious thought to buying a CTX700 and have been doing quite a bit if research both online and on YouTube. Correct me if I'm mistaken, there's always a 1st time ;) but there doesn't appear to be much difference between the years other than color, seat shape and availability of DCT. At present, I'm leaning towards getting a faired model vs the N. However, I encourage N model owners to talk me into going with the N instead.
I guess that's about all other than to include that I've been riding for over 50 yrs and have been fortunate enough to have ridden in 48 states and 4 countries. My brand of choice has been Suzukis, having owned at least one of every model GS from the 550 to the 1150. My present mount, an '83 GS1100E, has become a little too big for me when moving it around the garage. I figure its time to downsize and that lead me to the CTX700.
 

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Welcome! You pretty much nailed it. The only real difference between all the model years is colors and the seat foam.

All DCT models come with ABS in the US.

I'll be curious to hear your thoughts after you have ridden a CTX700.
 

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The name is TN Willie and, as you may've guessed, I hail from the Volunteer State. I've been giving serious thought to buying a CTX700 and have been doing quite a bit if research both online and on YouTube. Correct me if I'm mistaken, there's always a 1st time ;) but there doesn't appear to be much difference between the years other than color, seat shape and availability of DCT. At present, I'm leaning towards getting a faired model vs the N. However, I encourage N model owners to talk me into going with the N instead.
I guess that's about all other than to include that I've been riding for over 50 yrs and have been fortunate enough to have ridden in 48 states and 4 countries. My brand of choice has been Suzukis, having owned at least one of every model GS from the 550 to the 1150. My present mount, an '83 GS1100E, has become a little too big for me when moving it around the garage. I figure its time to downsize and that lead me to the CTX700.
welcome. my first ctx700 was a 2014 faired model, manual trans, no abs. nice bike for me after several goldwings and other 600+ pound bikes(i'm 73). my current 2014 ctx700n is naked and all manual. not as much wind protection as the faired bike but i like it none the less. i'm getting 65-70 mpg all the time, this bike is easy to manouver and push around when parking and when riding 2 up it gets through the mountains here in arizona quite well(we weigh a combined 285#s). if you get one install a good windshield. i've had zero mechanical issues with both ctx's other than tires and chain/sprockets. oh yeah, get a center stand for sure. hope this info helps, mark in mesa arizona
 

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Take into account the condition of the roads you mostly ride on. As compared to the conventional upright riding position of the 83 GS the feet forward low seat height short stiff rear shock travel is not well suited to gravel covered pot hole filled rural back roads. Choose the best style of bike that fits your riding location. Where I live the CTX DCT can’t be matched. Flat perfectly paved roads with heavy stop and go traffic. If I took it to the back roads of south west Pa. where I used to ride a 1980 GS750 I would hate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I definitely appreciate the responses and suggestions. I was going to post a pic of the 1100 I'll be giving up but couldn't figure out how to. Maybe it'd be frowned upon if I did and I'd rather not risk that. As for the type of roads where I'll be riding, I lean towards mountain roads that are smooth but twisty. I'm thankful to have so many within 50 miles of home.
I like the idea of the N model but am not sure if it has the expansive "frunk" that the faired model has, a feature I find quite appealing. I see the ability to remove a windscreen that I'd mount on an N a definite plus during the Summer. As nice as the hard bags would be, I'd be satisfied with soft luggage when needed.
It may also be worth mentioning that the CTX won't be my only bike. I have a Suzuki GT750 resto-mod that I've owned since '79. Worse comes to worse, I can get my "twisty fix" on that and use the CTX for more casual rides in the hills.
Seasons greetings and thanks again.
 

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Check in with Shroaders Honda in Hendersonville . I just sold my CTX700NDCT to Jesse Shroader. It is les than 2000 miles and has Hepco hard Bags , center stand , and Magstad windshield. I've been a customer there for 25 years. The goto place for a Honda.
I had to quit riding due to chest operations (3 so far) that have caused severe sternum deterioration.
 

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I like the idea of the N model but am not sure if it has the expansive "frunk" that the faired model has, a feature I find quite appealing.
I have the N model and I think the faired model has the same amount of storage over the fuel tank as the naked. By “frunk” you may be thinking of the NC models where the fuel tank is under the back seat and can fit a full faced helmet into the empty void where the fuel tank is on the CTX. On 1/23/17 I bought a used, unloved poorly maintained 2014, 2 owners N DCT off Craig’s list with 2951 miles on it for $4000 and turned it into the ultimate beach cruiser. Good luck in your quest to find what you are looking for.
[/QUOTE]
 

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As for the type of roads where I'll be riding, I lean towards mountain roads that are smooth but twisty. I'm thankful to have so many within 50 miles of home.
Attached is a video of what the CTX can do in the twisties from the perspective of a race car driver following member RedBarronRider.
And here is a link to a video where a race car driver was behind me on Blood Mountain (April 2020). My part starts 4 minutes in. It is CRAZY how a CTX700 performs in the turns! Very impressive!!!! See video at 6:45 min mark where she gets kudos from race driver!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
THAT's the kind of video I needed to see! Thanks and I agree that it was impressive. Running on Blood Mountain brings back some great memories of when I used to ride up and down it while visiting TWO in Suches. Yeah, good times for sure. Thanks again.
 

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Attached is a video of what the CTX can do in the twisties from the perspective of a race car driver following member RedBarronRider.
And here is a link to a video where a race car driver was behind me on Blood Mountain (April 2020). My part starts 4 minutes in. It is CRAZY how a CTX700 performs in the turns! Very impressive!!!! See video at 6:45 min mark where she gets kudos from race driver!!!
Very impressive riders you are dgall and Red BarronRider. I have heard others say how great these bikes perform in the Appalachains.
 

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My longest road trip on "Flicker" was going to West Virginia to ride the twisties for several days. I traveled with my husband on his Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero (800+ pounds, 1700ccs) and my friends on their Harley Ultra (900+ pounds, 1700+ ccs).

On the interstate riding to get to Elkins, "Flicker" sometimes struggled to keep up. On long, long uphill climbs I kept having to drop a gear and scurry to catch up with the bigger motorcycles, which just loped along. My gas mileage was pretty poor, too, like only about 50 MPG.

Ah, but then we got to the mountains.

I rode the pants off my Honda for 4 days. My friends on their larger touring bikes had to work to keep up with me. Further, I would sit on the side at gas station after gas station while they fueled up, because "Flicker" gave me 70 miles to the gallon in sport mode.

I always tell people that whether the CTX700 is the right bike for them depends on what you want to do with it. It's not the best choice for long highway runs -- although it will certainly do the job, just not in easy comfort. Also, it's not a sport bike, so don't expect sport bike performance.

But as a bike to toss around the curves, and also as a commuter, it's hard to beat.
 

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Check in with Shroaders Honda in Hendersonville . I just sold my CTX700NDCT to Jesse Shroader. It is les than 2000 miles and has Hepco hard Bags , center stand , and Magstad windshield. I've been a customer there for 25 years. The goto place for a Honda.
I had to quit riding due to chest operations (3 so far) that have caused severe sternum deterioration.
Sorry to learn of your health issues. Really good of you to post your bike info for others. Best Wishes!(y)
 

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In my opinion, a faired model with a tall windshield (up to chin level) will eliminate buffeting and make a more comfortable ride than the naked version. The pros of the DCT are ABS and the DCT transmission. The con is the slow speed manueverability. Takes practice on a DCT, but a manual is more controllable at slow speed.
 

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My longest road trip on "Flicker" was going to West Virginia to ride the twisties for several days. I traveled with my husband on his Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero (800+ pounds, 1700ccs) and my friends on their Harley Ultra (900+ pounds, 1700+ ccs).

On the interstate riding to get to Elkins, "Flicker" sometimes struggled to keep up. On long, long uphill climbs I kept having to drop a gear and scurry to catch up with the bigger motorcycles, which just loped along. My gas mileage was pretty poor, too, like only about 50 MPG.

Ah, but then we got to the mountains.

I rode the pants off my Honda for 4 days. My friends on their larger touring bikes had to work to keep up with me. Further, I would sit on the side at gas station after gas station while they fueled up, because "Flicker" gave me 70 miles to the gallon in sport mode.

I always tell people that whether the CTX700 is the right bike for them depends on what you want to do with it. It's not the best choice for long highway runs -- although it will certainly do the job, just not in easy comfort. Also, it's not a sport bike, so don't expect sport bike performance.

But as a bike to toss around the curves, and also as a commuter, it's hard to beat.
I have always liked those Kawasaki Vaqueros and it's sibling the Voyager. Excellent and reliable motors although a bit top heavy (not a big deal). It surpises me they have not sold better, however the heavy cruiser/bagger U S market just craves the Harleys and now the Indians also. I wonder if Kawasaki has plans to update the Vaquero sometime soon or go the route of Yamaha and just get out of this market?
 

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I have always liked those Kawasaki Vaqueros and it's sibling the Voyager. Excellent and reliable motors although a bit top heavy (not a big deal). It surpises me they have not sold better, however the heavy cruiser/bagger U S market just craves the Harleys and now the Indians also. I wonder if Kawasaki has plans to update the Vaquero sometime soon or go the route of Yamaha and just get out of this market?
My husband loved, loved, loved that Vaquero. That motor would run 80 MPH all day long without missing a beat. It had a NICE range of equipment, and frankly cost a fraction of what a comparable Harley Roadglide would cost. Tremendous bang for the buck. It nearly broke his heart when he had to let it go because it simply got too heavy for him to handle as he grew older.

Personally I think that the cruiser market in the U.S. is stagnant and the Big 4 Japanese manufacturers are not making enough $$ from it to innovate.

Example: Suzuki has cut its line of cruisers down dramatically in the last 10 years. One of its last remaining cruiser offerings in the Boulevard C50, which it has not changed except for paint jobs since 2006.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In my opinion, a faired model with a tall windshield (up to chin level) will eliminate buffeting and make a more comfortable ride than the naked version. The pros of the DCT are ABS and the DCT transmission. The con is the slow speed manueverability. Takes practice on a DCT, but a manual is more controllable at slow speed.
I value and appreciate your opinion. Ironically, I've begun to give more consideration to an N model w/o the DCT for a couple of reasons. Correct me if I'm wrong but other than additional wind protection the fairing doesn't have anything else going for it but appearance. For the extra weight and additional difficulty to access items covered by the fairing, I think an appropriate plexi-fairing might provide as much, if not more, protection. As for the DCT, as much as I LOVE the paddle shifters on my Miata, I'm not so sure I like the idea of having additional components on a bike, especially ones I'm unfamiliar with, that could fail vs the standard transmission. I've always done my own repairs and don't like the idea of having any of my motor vehicles serviced "professionally". Finally, buying an N model w/o DCT would allow me to get some serious CTX saddle time for less money. Then, if I enjoy the CTX as much as I hope to, I'll have additional time to check out a DCT equipped and/or a faired model. Then, I'd be able to make a more informed decision as to whether or not I want to spend the extra money for the extra features and weight.
Lastly, to any of you who feel I'm over thinking this whole thing, I want to you to know that I agree with you. :)
I also hope that no one is bothered in the least with any or all of my posts. If so, I apologize as that's not my intention at all.
 

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TN Willie, as you know, no one motorcycle will fit every rider's needs. The good thing about the CTX700 is that it is versatile. I have an N model with DCT, because I like some wind. (for wind therapy) and I have arthritis that has made operating a clutch lever unsafe. The light weight, and reliability make this a good platform to start making minor mods to make it your dream bike. That is what I did. I've had mine for 5 years, this is my last bike, and I love it. Pick your model, and go for it. :giggle:(y)
 
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