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Hello,

I just purchased my CTX700ND on Saturday, and I love it so far. I've been riding for 13 years now, and come from a mostly sportbike background, with a few interesting standard bikes thrown in for good measure. (Harley XR1200, Triumph Thunderbird and Daytona, Honda Hawk GT, 919, VFR's, ZX7r and ZX9r, Superhawk, Buell Firebolt and Lightning, and more!). Too bad I can only afford to keep one bike at a time, it would make my life easier. :)

It's an engaging and fun ride, and not just for a beginners. I can't wait to get to know the bike and put some miles on her.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

That is a lot of bikes in 13 years! I've had the opportunity to ride a few of the ones you named, and they were just excellent motorcycles.
With some of the riding pedigrees on this forum, I would definitely say the CTX will not be just for beginners. It's design lends it to riders with passion for something with a fresh design, reliability, balance and technology built into it. It's road ready from the get go and should prove to be a worthy touring bike or street bike for just about any rider new or experienced.
 

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I'm strongly considering one of these CTX700 fairing models; trading my 330 cc scooter in on it to get away from CVT transmissions and into a more common brand with more support with service, parts, and aftermarket choices and longer overall life riding 9000 miles per year on a work commute.

One of my biggest concerns is that a couple of reviews (one consumer and one professional) have hinted that one becomes kind of a human sail on one, but that the fairing keeps some of the wind off one's upper body. The reason I'm concerned is that, with the scooter, I've become accustomed to be able to ride in temps down to the upper 20s. I've got good riding gear and plan on getting heated grips of some kind, but even so, will I be giving up the winter riding on this bike? Will it be that much worse on the highway on the lower body?
 

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Honestly, with good gear, I think you can ride anything you want. I have ridden through Glacier National Monument with the same Jacket I use for Florida during the winter.
In regard to the Fairing acting like a sail, some bikes do catch air more than others but I have never had one pull me off the road (well one time in MO Tornado Cell nearby, I ditched the bike for cover). I have ridden large Fairing bikes without a problem really. Saddlebags on my Vulcan 1700 push harder than the giant windscreen in shearing winds.
I have not had the chance to ride this bike yet, but IMO I think you should be fine.
 

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Honestly, with good gear, I think you can ride anything you want. I have ridden through Glacier National Monument with the same Jacket I use for Florida during the winter.
In regard to the Fairing acting like a sail, some bikes do catch air more than others but I have never had one pull me off the road (well one time in MO Tornado Cell nearby, I ditched the bike for cover). I have ridden large Fairing bikes without a problem really. Saddlebags on my Vulcan 1700 push harder than the giant windscreen in shearing winds.
I have not had the chance to ride this bike yet, but IMO I think you should be fine.
Thanks for the encouraging words. My purpose for buying a bike is primarily so that I'll have a highly fuel-frugal, two-wheel vehicle for transportation that will work (as much as possible) for a reasonably-comfortable, year around commute to and from work, and I want something that's built to last years with little bother, riding many miles each year, almost exclusively for this purpose. I put 7600 miles on my scooter in only ten months. I found it surprisingly comfortable enough to ride even in the winter when it wasn't too cold outside, and I put many more miles on it than I had envisioned even though I didn't use it hardly at all for recreation or for running around town.

When I purchased the scooter one year ago, I thought that maybe I'd ride it some on weekends, for running errands, and just for fun, and that I would also use it some for riding for my work commute. But what I've learned over the year is that I really like using it for the commute even more often than I thought, but that, since I'm always with my spouse when not riding to and from work, I don't use it for much else. Also, I've found, that if I try using it for running errands and the like, it's sort of an aggravation, because then I'm dealing with putting on and taking off all the gear and storing the gear at each stop. The gear makes the ride much more comfortable and safer, and when I ride to work and back, it's easy, because I just deal with the gear a couple of times, and I don't even have to store it on the bike.

I really like the idea of giving up the CVT on the scooter and going with something that I can put in a high gear and cruise to maximize fuel economy. The CVT also requires too much regular service, which I don't like. I also like the idea of the longer oil change intervals and tire tread wear intervals as compared to the scooter, and the higher top-end speed, and the ability to use regular gasoline. But I do worry a little, based on another thread, that if the bike treats my body like a sail, it may be a little exhausting riding along my 35 minute commute every day, whereas the scooter doesn't pull on me at all, and I also worry a little that it will be a little harder to stop the cold air from cutting through my layering, which is not an issue now with the scooter.
 

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I've become accustomed to be able to ride in temps down to the upper 20s.
Wow! I don't know how you do it. Despite having some decently padded biking clothing, I really can't tolerate riding when temps drop below 50F. It just becomes uncomfortable after a few minutes.

I guess I never realized the air dynamics are somewhat different on a scooter where your legs can be hidden away from the wind, and if you have a tall windshield, your upper body can be, too. I do have a windshield on my Vulcan, but to be honest, I don't think it helps much when it's just cold outside, but it does help a bit, especially if you're not going too fast.
 

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For my scooter I just use regular gas and some fuel stablizer. For cold commutes (29F - 40F) I will wear insulated coveralls over my leather chaps over jeans. That and a GoGoGear Trench and maybe some other layering do a pretty good job of keeping me toasty except for my fingers. Hot Hands don't always warm the fingertips. Anything colder and I'm taking the car.
I do know a lady who used Thermacare patches for a bike trip from LA to Philidelphia. She said they worked great.
I just take my gear in with me where ever I go. Seems ridiculous to leave the gear that is to keep you warm out in the cold. At the store I get a buggy to carry it and at a restaurant I make a conversation piece. I have met several riders by just having my helmet on the table.
I don't think that the fairing on the CTX is going to block wind on your legs like a scooter. It also depends on the scooter. Mine blocks some but not all. The taller windshield should block most of the fatiguing sail effects but given the design you will have to go with the Honda made accessory. Part of that is going to depend on how tall you are. The only way to know for sure is to wait and test drive one when they come in.
 

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Wow! I don't know how you do it. Despite having some decently padded biking clothing, I really can't tolerate riding when temps drop below 50F. It just becomes uncomfortable after a few minutes.

I guess I never realized the air dynamics are somewhat different on a scooter where your legs can be hidden away from the wind, and if you have a tall windshield, your upper body can be, too. I do have a windshield on my Vulcan, but to be honest, I don't think it helps much when it's just cold outside, but it does help a bit, especially if you're not going too fast.
Keeping the body warm has never been a problem for me even down to the upper twenties and even before I got a tall windshield with my First Gear insulated suit. The limiting factor for me has always been my hands; particularly my finger tips. I've tried every good glove and liner I could find; nothing keeps them warm. The tall and wide screen is no help and only helps to quieten the ride. I have not tried heated grips or heated gloves. I don't like the idea of heated gloves, because I don't want the aggravation of plugging in every day as a daily rider; but heated grips is something I'll definitely be looking at next winter.
 

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For my scooter I just use regular gas and some fuel stablizer.
My Piaggio calls for 95RON. I think that equals 91 octane or thereabouts, so I use premium. That's another good thing about most Hondas. Regular gas is so much cheaper, especially if you're running pure gas. Pure gas premium cost me about 80 cents more than I can get ethanol-fortified regular for and about 65 cents more than pure regular gas. I like using pure gas though, because I don't have to worry about it if I store it for a while, and I get about 3% better mpg, so it equals out on price. If I get a bike that takes regular though, I'll come out better paying only about 15 cents more per gallon than E10.
 

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Just rode a red ctx700n yesterday in Paris TX. Loved the power, and the seating position could not have felt better. With nothing in front of me at speeds exceeding 65 mph I was being pushed back pretty hard and with long arms I was left getting a good workout trying to keep myself comfortable. I can see the need of an aftermarket windscreen for the 700n and it would help me stay interested.
 

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I have an F15 plexiglass windshield left over from my Hawk GT and may try to fit that somewhere down the road. looks like it would have to mount to handle bars and I could change out the headlight upper bolts to longer studs that could over a mounting point low. It won't be a priority but have given it some thought. At 75mpr for more than 30 minutes is more work sitting up for sure.
 

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Just rode a red ctx700n yesterday in Paris TX. Loved the power, and the seating position could not have felt better. With nothing in front of me at speeds exceeding 65 mph I was being pushed back pretty hard and with long arms I was left getting a good workout trying to keep myself comfortable. I can see the need of an aftermarket windscreen for the 700n and it would help me stay interested.
Did you feel any push from the chest down or was it all directed at your upper torso and head?
 

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I put an F15 windshield on my naked CTX and what a difference with wind at freeway speed. If you can wait and you are definitely wanting a windshield get the fairing model then get the taller windscreen. It will look better too. I do take mine off from time to time depending on what riding I am doing.

If you look at how long the NC700X has been out, it should give you the notion that accessories will not be rapidly coming from after market sources. You can get generic windshields and fabricate mounting brackets like I did.
 
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