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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yes that's right.. I've never rode a bike before In my life, only a dirtbike for about 15 mins.

Now I'm considering buying the Ctx700n automatic as a first bike, first ride. A big reason for this is to teach my self to shift eventually. I know most people will say to buy a used bike first or have someone teach me. But I don't know anyone with a bike, on top of it there isn't too many bikes for sale that are worth it around here, even at dealers. I would rather put the investment in a new bike to be honest.

So I'm curious how insane would this just be, To buy this motorcycle and try to start riding? I just figure.. I gotta start somewhere... and for heavens sake I'm dreaming about riding everyday. I'm a pretty cautious person, not a speed daemon by any means, I just woke up one day with the urge to ride and it has never left me since.
 

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JoeNeil, It's a free country and you can do what you wish. But....... starting with a ctx with automatic does not teach you much about shifting and clutches and your spending about $8k to start. Way to much if you have never ridden. What if you don't like bikes ?

lots of good bikes to be had in the 1500 range that are reliable enough to learn on. Heck even an Old Honda Trail bike could teach you the basics. And you could learn to service them yourself, chain, valves, oil & filters. Be at 1 with the machine...lol

a Honda Rebel is a great 1st bike. they use them in riding schools. Buying used means when you are ready to go up to a bigger bike you get most of your money back unless you crashed it because of stupidity. You were going to take a riding class aren't you? A must if you want to live in my opinion. good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for the reply

The big reason of choosing the ctx700n is being automatic, pretty much the whole purpose of getting the bike is so i dont need to concentrate on shifting until im completely comfortable riding, that and not having any issues mechanically with it.

Buying a new bike instead of a used suprisingly enough was my fathers idea, he has rode for about 20 years, but not in the last 10. He also thought i would pick up learning to ride quick an would be fine on a heavy new bike, his words were that i would regret buying a used lighterweight bike in about 3 months.

But i do have my own mind and this was a concern of mine, so this is why im getting second opinons, so i thank you for your advice.

Joe
 

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Spend less time dreaming about a first bike and more time in face-to-face discussion with a qualified riding instructor. If he can't persuade you otherwise, take out heaps of insurance and make sure the policy covers what you plan on doing.
If I've hurt your feelings, I make no apology. You'll get over it more easily than your first taste of gravel rash.
 

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17 months ago I decided to buy a scooter to save on gas. I had never ridden a motorized bike before and taught myself. I started out with a 108cc scooter. Then 3 months later, moved up to a 150cc once I was comfortable riding. And of course now the CTX700 automatic is next on my list. For me, getting started on a smaller platform helped me learn the basic of motorcycling. If you decide to make the CTX your first bike, you have the benefit of your father's experience with motorcycles to help you. Good luck.
 

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I'm not as experienced as some on here, but I've been through the first year and have a totally different perspective on being a beginner than most riders. From my perspective, I think too much is made of being a beginner. I see a ride as a piece of transportation primarily; not a recreational vehicle, and just as with a car, I wouldn't go out and buy a smaller or slower car than what I needed in my life with the plan of eventually working my way up to something that I really needed or wanted. But with respect to a car, if I'm a new driver and I've chosen a big car or pickup, then it's going to take me longer to learn how to properly control and operate that bigger vehicle. Same with a bike, if I want a bigger bike, then I'm going to need more train up time. I'd rather do the training and easing in to situations than to buy something that I know I'm not going to keep.

To me this is like saying I'm going to go out and spend money on something that I don't really want, just so I can work my way up to something that I want later. I would rather spend a lot of extra time and money training and getting used to something that I really want than to buy something that I don't want. However, buying something used very cheaply, that is in your size range, does make sense and is something that I should have considered before buying a $5500 scooter. I dropped it once with no major damage, but it did cause some cosmetic damage that has hurt the trade value. If I have spent $1500 on a used scooter, it wouldn't have been such a loss. Also, even though I lucked out, and I did learn over the past year that riding was going to be everything I expected and more, it could have gone differently. I could have learned that riding wasn't for me, and in that case, I would have lost a lot of money buying new and then trying to sell it.

I don't subscribe to this graduated theory like most do. I didn't want to work my way up to something bigger. I wanted to start with the right size and stick with it, but, in my case, I'm not looking to eventually ride a big, heavy, or fast bike; only a bike that is suitable for my 55-mile-per-day highway commute. A lot of people want to eventually work their way up to a 600 lb plus bike, and I guess for these people, the graduated theory makes more sense; though still an expensive way to ride a bike. In your post, you stated that you wanted the CTX as a beginner bike. This was not my thinking at all on my first ride, so I'm assuming you want to work yourself up to something bigger and/or faster, and the graduated theory may work better for you. If this is the case, I would think that a new CTX is a very expensive first choice that will suffer severe depreciation in a very short time like all new bikes.

My first choice was a 330 cc scooter that weighs 395 lbs and a top speed of 86 mph and great acceleration (not exactly as small or slow scooter). My choice was almost perfect aside from the maintenance aspect of scooters that I had not researched, and, except for that one issue, it could have been the perfect choice for what I use it for even though most people stated that I should have started smaller and lighter.

I also don't subscribe to the idea that one needs to be able to ride a manual shift to ride a bike. There are plenty of automatic choices out there, however, most of them are scooters, and I don't believe that someone ever has to learn how to shift, even if he or she is going to be a life time rider, to be a good, skilled rider. To me, it's just the same as a car. You can learn through experience and through being a caring, attentive person to become a great driver without knowing a thing about shifting a manual car. I don't see how a scooter or MC is any different. You can become a great rider on an automatic, but if you ever decide you want to ride a shifting MC, then you'll have to do alot of training to be safe riding it as well, because then one has to get good at shifting while still being able to concentrate on all the other aspects of riding at the same time. You stated that you wanted to learn how to shift and you stated that the CTX was going to be your beginner bike. It just seems to me that it's an awful expensive choice if you plan on using it as a stepping stone to something else, but I guess cost is relative. If you're going to eventually ride a shifting bike, and a shifting bike is going to be your eventual ride, why not just learn to ride a shifting bike from the beginning. If you learn an automatic first, then you'll still have a long learning curve riding at the same skill level on a shifting bike. If you learn to do both at the same time, it's not going to be that much harder than learning to be good at riding an automatic bike.
 

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hi, joe. i'm a new rider, too. to get my motorcycle endorsement (license) in colorado, i chose to take an approved instruction class. best $200 and weekend i've spent in quite a while. as others here said, learning to shift as you learn to ride is a good plan and the school will help you along with shifting in fine fashion.

my first bike is a honda shadow, 750 v-twin. a lot more motorcycle than the suzuki 250 twin i rode at class, but the class prepared me well for moving up to the larger ride.

good luck with your quest!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I thank you guys for taking your time to post, I definitely have alot to think about and a few new things to take into consideration.

A few things I should rephrase and add about the situation is, I have no transportation at the moment of my own. So this was going to be my first new vehicle of my own. I will be driving this bike alot. I really need something of my own at the moment for commuting. I will also not need nor will I be taking it on the highway for a good while.

A few of your mentioned the learning of shifting. Now that I think about it, I really don't care to learn shifting at the moment, I more just want a form of getting around, that can also be recreational. So perhaps you guys will see why i'm taking such a huge leap of not being a rider into a brand new bike. I don't need the issues of a used bike.

I also was not planning on taking any learning courses before riding. Perhaps after I bought the bike I would take some courses, but at the moment I have no method of getting around to take courses.
 

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I will join in with the group suggesting a riding course. I was 51 when I first decided to ride. The course I took provided 250's to practice. They not only teach you to shift, they teach you important strategies to ride defensively. I bought a 400CC Burgman touring scooter and have put 15K miles on it riding to work and the occasional weekend ride. That was 5 years ago. It was a excellent commuter bike. Now I want a bike that I can take longer rides on. But without that class, I would have found myself struggling to learn good riding habits. In short....you don't know what you don't know. I strongly suggest you take a class.
 

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I'll second (third?) the notion that you really need to look into taking the basic rider course, before getting yourself a motorcycle of any size or style. You don't want to develop any bad habits that will be harder to break, after you've been "figuring it out on your own for a while." It also allows you to learn things like emergency collision avoidance and braking on someone else's motorcycle.

Don't let your rush to be independent cost you more than you're really willing to pay.
 

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Take a good MSF course its the best way to get into it, this way you can determine if an automatic or manual motorcycle is the right choice for you AND it will teach you a lot of the do's and don'ts without having to learn them on the "fly" so to speak.

My class started us out on the Buell Blasts which were 500cc bikes which I felt was the perfect size to gain your bearings on.
 

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The Basic Riders course is worth every penny. In Texas it is the best way to get your endorsement and an insurance break. I was 49/50 when I took the course. There were experienced riders in there that DID not have their endorsement so HAD to take it. They said that they learned a lot from the class. And that class is NO JOKE. It will teach you a lot about riding and yourself. It can help you learn techniques that will save your life/skin.
 
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A few things I should rephrase and add about the situation is, I have no transportation at the moment of my own. So this was going to be my first new vehicle of my own. I will be driving this bike alot. I really need something of my own at the moment for commuting.
And you decided that a bike is the best way to go about it? I realize you want to kill two birds with one stone here, but I really think this is a bad idea. If you need a reliable commuter, you should buy a car. You can buy a decent used car for what a new CTX costs (plus proper riding gear). Commute on a bike is fine if the weather is nice, but what happens when it rains, snows, hails, becomes very windy, etc. and you still need to get to work/school/etc.? Also, a car has storage space, so you can do your grocery shopping, errands, etc. Heck, for a price of a new CTX, you may be able to get a used car as well as a used bike to practice and gain confidence on.

If you still end up getting a bike, I strongly support the other members that you should take an MSF course first, for your own good as well as for others on the road that you may come in contact with. And when you do take that course, they'll teach you how to shift gears anyway, and at that point you can just get a manual bike.

I'm also not advising that you buy a new bike as your first bike. Chances are you'll do something silly to it like scrape it, tip it over, lay it, etc, even after you've taken the MSF course. And this will bring down the value of that new bike quite a bit. Now, if you buy an older bike that already has a few bruises here and there, putting another couple of bruises on it won't affect its value all that much, and you can easily resell this bike in a few months or a year and not lose a lot of money when you're ready to upgrade to something bigger and better.
 

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Noone has really mentioned it but in most states to be legal riding a motorcycle you need a motorcycle endorsement.
In order to do that, depending on the state, you must go to the Motor Vehicle Dept and pass a test. Some states give you an endorsement as long as you passed a Motorcycle Safety Foundation class.
Some states still make you take a test on a closed course to demonstrate you know how to ride, even if you passed a MSF course.
Getting caught for any kind of traffic infraction on a bike without an endorsement will cost you money. That ought to be a motivator to investigate your state requirements, take a class, and get the proper license.
 

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The rider safety course is a must IMO. You will gain so much knowledge as a rookie rider. After the course is when I thought the DCT model would work best for me. I have a short commute and the shifting I could see becoming monotonous with several stops.
 

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I also agree. Take the BRC. Your location is not listed so I can't tell if the course might be free where you live. I took the course on a scooter (their scooter) and eventually bought a scooter, then an automatic bike, the CTXs cousin.

The BRC is the best. Where else can you learn to ride on somebody else's bike and bang the gears, drop the bike and make all kinds of mistakes and they don't mind. Just don't do all of that during the test.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well as much as I was gunhoe about getting a CTX i'm taking some of the advice you guys gave me and I think I will be getting a Q Link Legacy (CF Moto 250cc) for the time being. This way I'll find out If I really love riding, and its everything I'm hoping it is without the expense. Next year in the spring Ill take the MSF course and buy a manual bike. Thanks for the help greatly appreciated.
 

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I'll second (third?) the notion that you really need to look into taking the basic rider course, before getting yourself a motorcycle of any size or style. You don't want to develop any bad habits that will be harder to break, after you've been "figuring it out on your own for a while." It also allows you to learn things like emergency collision avoidance and braking on someone else's motorcycle.

Don't let your rush to be independent cost you more than you're really willing to pay.
Well put.

I have had several friends who were new to riding and wanted to practice first before taking the rider education course. They all had trouble in the course because of the bad habits they learned. Not that they were bad riders but because there is a very specific way that instructors must test riders and if you do not perform each task exactly, you will not pass that portion of the test.


Once you take the course, it will give you an insight to what you feel you will want, and be able, to ride.
 

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Well as much as I was gunhoe about getting a CTX i'm taking some of the advice you guys gave me and I think I will be getting a Q Link Legacy (CF Moto 250cc) for the time being. This way I'll find out If I really love riding, and its everything I'm hoping it is without the expense. Next year in the spring Ill take the MSF course and buy a manual bike. Thanks for the help greatly appreciated.
If you have not bought the CF Moto look at a used low mileage (any year) Honda 250 REBEL or nighthawk. Lots around and they run forever. If you get a good deal (because it is a buyers market) you will be able to sell it and not loose much money if any if you keep it clean and straight. It will be a fairly close bike except for size and power to the CTX. Forward controls, low seat, naked.

that's my bottom line to recommend.
 
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