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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm very interested in the CTX700. It fills many of the needs I have on my wish list for a next bike...except one. But perhaps there's a way to take care of that too.

I currently commute year around on a Suzuki Burgman 400. I've put over 75,000 miles in the past few years riding up and down I-5 in Seattle. One of the advantages of the Burgman 400, is the full fairing that extends down to the floorboards. It has excellent weather protection. My boots have become wet in the past, but only when they were getting in sad shape and needing replacing.

So the CTX700 has a "full fairing"...but the feet seem exposed. Is there any protection to keep them out of the direct blast of rain and road spray? Or will this be an issue for me? Or is there some kind of accessory like the wind deflectors on the NC700X that can be added?

Thanks,
Chris
 

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I'm not entirely sure what you are asking.

You don't like the "cruiser" style positioning with the feet forward? If you are worried, I think a good pair of boots should be able to protect your feet.

Or maybe you might like the NC700 better. The CTX700 is based on the NC700 platform. And the feet are facing backwards like a more traditional sportsbike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Perhaps these pictures will help explain why I am asking. Despite having a "full fairing", the foot pegs on the CTX700 are hanging out in the air. That looks like probably much of the leg from below the knee to the foot is out in whatever elements you're riding in. I commute daily in conditions from 16F and up. Living in Seattle, riding in rain is a reality unless you ride a garage queen. And my commute can be up to an hour and a half, depending on traffic conditions. So I need to be prepared to ride comfortably in those conditions.






Here's a side view of the Burgman 400 like what I currently ride. I actually place my feet slightly more forward with the front of the boot on the forward sloping portion. The result is the entire leg and foot is pretty much out of the direct effect of the elements. The fairing and floorboards here direct much of the water and cold wind around me.



So as I wrote in the first post, " Is there any protection to keep them out of the direct blast of rain and road spray? Or will this be an issue for me? Or is there some kind of accessory like the wind deflectors on the NC700X that can be added?"

I have no issue with a cruiser style foot positioning like the CTX700 has. It's basically where my feet have been for the past couple years over 75,000 miles. But I found in the beginning of this commute a couple years ago on the Burgman, that my feet were getting cold. I had to come up with solutions to keep this a comfortable commute. So I'm just looking ahead and trying to figure out what I can do here with the CTX700.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is wierd. I sent in a reply, but it never showed up.

So let me try to show you with a couple pictures of what I'm referring to. It looks to me from the pictures I've found, that everything from the boot to halfway up the calf is directly exposed to the elements. In the summer, it's not a big deal. In the winter on a commute that can sometimes be 1.5 hours, being cold and wet can make a miserable ride. Most of my commuting for at least six months of the year is in temps between freezing and 40F. Quite often, it is raining. And when the temp goes above 40F, it is still raining.





On the other hand, you can see what I've been spoiled with in these two pictures from a review on the Burgman 400. The fairing goes all the way to the floorboards. The leg and foot do get wet, but they aren't in the direct air flow.





When I first commuted on a bike, I had a 15-19 minute commute each way. About the time I started getting a chill, I was in the parking lot and walking into the building. When I changed work locations, I picked up a minimum 40 minute commute that easily expands to 1.5 hours with some rain and a couple accidents to jam everything up. I solved the problem of getting cold in the torso, but found the hands and feet took a little more effort to keep warm.

Well, the Gerbings heated gloves have the hands solved, no matter what bike I ride. But I'm looking at the Honda CTX700 and I see that my feet might be an issue. When I look at those pictures below, especially the first one, it looks like you're okay from the knees up, but the area below them is exposed.


So for those of you who commute in the cold and rain, what can be done to keep the feet dry and warm without moving to Phoenix? ;)

Chris
 

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This is wierd. I sent in a reply, but it never showed up.

So let me try to show you with a couple pictures of what I'm referring to. It looks to me from the pictures I've found, that everything from the boot to halfway up the calf is directly exposed to the elements. In the summer, it's not a big deal. In the winter on a commute that can sometimes be 1.5 hours, being cold and wet can make a miserable ride. Most of my commuting for at least six months of the year is in temps between freezing and 40F. Quite often, it is raining. And when the temp goes above 40F, it is still raining.





On the other hand, you can see what I've been spoiled with in these two pictures from a review on the Burgman 400. The fairing goes all the way to the floorboards. The leg and foot do get wet, but they aren't in the direct air flow.





When I first commuted on a bike, I had a 15-19 minute commute each way. About the time I started getting a chill, I was in the parking lot and walking into the building. When I changed work locations, I picked up a minimum 40 minute commute that easily expands to 1.5 hours with some rain and a couple accidents to jam everything up. I solved the problem of getting cold in the torso, but found the hands and feet took a little more effort to keep warm.

Well, the Gerbings heated gloves have the hands solved, no matter what bike I ride. But I'm looking at the Honda CTX700 and I see that my feet might be an issue. When I look at those pictures below, especially the first one, it looks like you're okay from the knees up, but the area below them is exposed.


So for those of you who commute in the cold and rain, what can be done to keep the feet dry and warm without moving to Phoenix? ;)

Chris
I'd probably just look in to get some waterproof or rain proof gear. Most importantly water proof boots. I already own a pair and it makes a world of a difference for those unexpected down pours.
 

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From the looks of it the Burgman 400 seems to be more effective with the aerodynamic. While riding your pretty much enclose with in. But it is a different style than the CTX700. I think its something we have to compromise.
 

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Comparing the two the burgman is more of a scooter type bike rather than a cruiser. Although the Burgman 400 offers better wind deflecting for the feet I would still pick the CTX700 over it. I love the look over the funtion. If anything i'll just get the hardcase saddles and put rainproof gear just incase. Those are water prrof ;)
 

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I'm a newer rider compared to most of you but wouldn't you just stay in when it's raining instead of fighting with mother nature. Would getting in the cage and going for a riding be more effective rather than have cold and soggy feet. I just can't imagine the CTX700 with running boards. That would be too much wouldn't it?
 

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A pair of water proof boots are your best bet. But there are down falls to having water proof boots and that is they don't have enough ventilation. At least for a decent priced pair you have to get the more expensive ones to get just a slight gust of wind in your feet. I still haven't seen any attachments for this type of bike to deflect the wind from your feet. And I think it won't look good either.

Running boards would change the whole look of the CTX700. SO I wouldn't suggest it.
 

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In the past for cruiser type bikes I've only seen crash bars or sliders for protection but in the case for water there isn't much except for rain proof boots like every body mentioned. But adding on such bars would change the over all looks I would imagine it would add some weight too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Adding running boards to the CTX700 would make it very close to the Integra (NC700D) that is sold in Europe. Same engine, frame and suspension. Just a slightly different implementation of it. Over there, Honda sells it as a "scooter". It just goes to prove our definition of a "scooter" is getting more and more blurred over time.

As for choosing to ride in the rain and cold, or not...I do. Riding gets me in the HOV lane for commuting to work and saves me about an hour each way to work and home. It also saves me $$$. I've saved over $7700 in the past couple years over the gas it would take me to drive the car. That's paid for the bike. :) And the best reason for riding is that it is immensely fun, whatever the temperature. I was more comfortable riding to work for an hour at 16F, than I was in riding in 100+F temps east of the Cascade mountains. If you know how to dress for it, you can ride in any temps...comfortably. So why not???

I don't want to buy a "garage queen". Function has to take precedence over buying a bike as an expensive toy. Maybe when I retire in a few years, I'll think about having a bike as a toy. (And each of us have different needs for riding, so it is all good.) In the meantime, I'm looking for something that'll serve me well for commuting Monday through Friday and be suitable for weekend trips across the state.

The only reason I'm considering the CTX700, is that I might get a better suspension. (The jury is still out on that since there's none in a dealership to test ride.) The Seattle roads are falling apart as the local and state governments can't afford to repair them. I honestly wonder if we'll get to the point where you need something like the NC700X just to commute to work. Not to take off-road, but to handle the pot holes. :rolleyes:

Otherwise, I'm very happy with the Burgman 400. I put 49,000 on the first one and sold it only because I found a phenomenal deal on another that I couldn't pass up. Basically, I traded one with 49,000 miles for a new one with 1 mile and it cost me a couple hundred $$.

For those of you who haven't looked at a maxi-scooter like the Burgman 400, you might be surprised at what you'll find. (And no, I'm not a salesman, nor trying to sell anyone. "Real" motorcycle riders tend to dismiss maxi-scooters because they don't fit the "normal" image of a motorcycle.:)) For instance, I'm leading a ride over Snoqualmie Pass, Blewett Pass and Stevens Pass in a month when the snow clears. Distance is 340 miles and 7 hours plus stops. That's not a big deal, and I do other day trips like that several times a summer. Last June, I completed a SS1000 on it going from Seattle to Montana and back. It handled that ride just fine and was extremely comfortable. I've thought about doing a Bun-Burner 1500 or Bun-Burner 1500 Gold on it. It'll take it, I'm just not sure I can. ;)

The only thing I really have against the Burgman 400, is the suspension. I was being really stupid one time and was up to about 90 mph following some sport-touring bikes on the North Cascades Highway and the bike wallowed around a couple corners when it hit some large bumps. (They slowed down, I didn't. I think they were smarter.:rolleyes: ) That's a one-time issue, because I don't ride like that normally, but the suspension does let you know when you hit a pot hole...and that can occur on a daily basis.

So if the suspension on the CTX700 is better, then I'm in the market for one and I just want to make sure it'll do everything the Burgman 400 has been doing for me...hence, the reason for asking the question in the first place. :)

Chris
 

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Those pictures really cleared it up for me. I suppose what you are looking for is some sort of wind deflector. I don't know for sure, but you could shop for an aftermarket piece that could be mounted on the bike to serve that purpose.

I found this online. They are meant to deflect wind. For your purposes, you would want to mount it lower to protect the feet. I'm not sure if it is compatible with the CTX though.

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for looking those up. That's the kind of answer I was hoping for. Not everyone rides "garage queens" that never see temps below 50F or sprinkles of rain. ;)

I think what I'm hoping for (but won't see probably) is something like the Honda Integra with the full fairing in front and the lower seat of the CTX700.

In the meantime, we wait till June when they will hit the dealer floors and we can see for ourselves.

Chris
 

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Those pictures really cleared it up for me. I suppose what you are looking for is some sort of wind deflector. I don't know for sure, but you could shop for an aftermarket piece that could be mounted on the bike to serve that purpose.

I found this online. They are meant to deflect wind. For your purposes, you would want to mount it lower to protect the feet. I'm not sure if it is compatible with the CTX though.

As great as these are for keeping your much more safer while riding, I think it kills how the bike looks. If it's on the CTX700N it won't look too bad, as it's only available in black, and the leg guard in black will just blend in.
 

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As for choosing to ride in the rain and cold, or not...I do. Riding gets me in the HOV lane for commuting to work and saves me about an hour each way to work and home. It also saves me $$$. I've saved over $7700 in the past couple years over the gas it would take me to drive the car. That's paid for the bike. :) And the best reason for riding is that it is immensely fun, whatever the temperature. I was more comfortable riding to work for an hour at 16F, than I was in riding in 100+F temps east of the Cascade mountains. If you know how to dress for it, you can ride in any temps...comfortably. So why not???
You should look into the NT700. I commute everyday year round in Seattle area too and it has proven to be an excellent ride offering great weather protection and storage capacity with a few add-ons. I added the knuckle deflectors, lower undercowl to protect the feet and heated grips and I stay dry and warm as toast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've posted the question on a couple boards, and many of the answers indicate the "real" motorcycle riders don't dress any differently than I do. So the problem isn't as big a deal as I had thought it might be.

HondaBikePro on the NC700X forum is within riding distance. When he gets the CTX700 in at the beginning of June, I'll ride down and try both it and the NC700X.

Didn't you just love the 36F morning commutes the past couple days? I keep thinking I'll pull the power cords for my heated gloves out of the jacket, and it's clearly not time yet.

I'll be leaving those in till at least after May 4th. A couple of us will be doing the "3 Pass Blast" and the temperature over Stevens Pass is supposed to be down to 29F.


Chris
 

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Have you considered some of the maintainance issues that you might encounter since you are a high milage rider? I chose the NT700 for its shaft drive and V-twin that has been tested for years. The Europeans have been riding this bike for about a decade and love the thing, just never really caught here in the US.

I guy is selling one in the Bothell area that is VERY well farkled. I met him once and I'm sure the bike was well loved.
http://www.nt-owners.org/forums/showthread.php?6391-2010-Honda-NT700-6600-(Bothell-WA)
 

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Those pictures really cleared it up for me. I suppose what you are looking for is some sort of wind deflector. I don't know for sure, but you could shop for an aftermarket piece that could be mounted on the bike to serve that purpose.

I found this online. They are meant to deflect wind. For your purposes, you would want to mount it lower to protect the feet. I'm not sure if it is compatible with the CTX though.



i have seen those floating around on the internet but never with actual ones on the street and I could understand why. It just ruins the look of the bike but I mean if you had to then yeah it sure has a purpose. I would hate to be seen with that on the road.
 

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I wouldn't get that unless I plan on riding through a storm. I thought it was a solar panel at first but figured why is it facing forward. I don't like how that looks.
 
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