CTX 700 Forum banner

21 - 40 of 64 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,745 Posts
Thankfully I'm 100 miles south of the farthest snow belt so I don't have to worry much about it. Very rare effect and when it does, nothing moves. Ice is the only thing I have to worry about but other than that, I ride year round even in the upper teens and twenties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
Back to the original question... :)

The local bike store runs monthly "bike nights" and runs slow drags. I've come in 3rd place twice. What is a slow drag? They set up a 100 foot long course, and the LAST one to finish the run without exiting their lane (about 5 feet wide) or putting their feet down wins! Both times I lost to a couple of serious offroad wizards who could simply stand and balance on their dual-sport bikes without moving. They basically stand at the starting line and watch everyone else putter down slow.

I can stay in the lane at about 3 MPH. Plenty of throttle, tons of rear brake, and a very relaxed position. The low CG and wide rear tire really help for super low-speed stability.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
I hate to admit this but I have 2500 miles on my bike and have never put it in sport mode. I love the manual but mostly run in D but after reading these post I'm going out and play with sport
The sport mode makes the bike much more responsive as it lets the revs come up higher before shifting up. You will notice a big difference as the bike will dart around with much more authority - at the expense of gas mileage of course. "D" is an economy mode, "S" is for when you don't care about gas mileage and just want to let it loose. If you put it into sport mode, on a nice clear and straight stretch of road, and hold the throttle wide open, it will shift very smoothly with higher revs to maximum acceleration and you will enjoy a little bit of a rush as it launches forward. Sport mode is a lot of fun.

Mind you, it's not like the torque of a liter sport bike, but it gets up and goes. Some may refer to this as a "beginner" bike but it's 670 cc's, which is not a beginner bike engine and the CTX has plenty of power for the highway, it's not like getting a 250 Honda Rebel and in 3 months you want to sell it, if you are really a beginner this bike can work for you for a long time. You won't quickly outgrow it. And if you are not beginner you will like this bike because it's way more than a beginner bike. That is my take on it, at least.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Back to the original question... :)

The local bike store runs monthly "bike nights" and runs slow drags. I've come in 3rd place twice. What is a slow drag? They set up a 100 foot long course, and the LAST one to finish the run without exiting their lane (about 5 feet wide) or putting their feet down wins! Both times I lost to a couple of serious offroad wizards who could simply stand and balance on their dual-sport bikes without moving. They basically stand at the starting line and watch everyone else putter down slow.

I can stay in the lane at about 3 MPH. Plenty of throttle, tons of rear brake, and a very relaxed position. The low CG and wide rear tire really help for super low-speed stability.
Yes, standing on the pegs lowers your center of gravity and gives you your full height for balance. I have seen R1220GS riders do that on off road slow speed events on curved foot paths on hills that had to be at 30 percent grades.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
I have to agree with El Gato. When I first got mine I kept it in "D" pretty much all the time, but as I got more familiar with the bike I found that different modes suited me better depending on what I was doing. Now I find myself changing modes all the time. You might be curious about why I would need to do this and to be completely straight about it, the shift points that the DCT takes is not always optimal for whatever situation is present at the moment. For instance, I find that the DCT shifts into 6th around 40 mph and that is fine if I'm just cruising, but if I try to accelerate at that speed in 6th or if I'm going up a hill (again at that speed) the engine lugs too much. I can toggle down a gear for better acceleration and that works well, but if I'm trying to go up a hill and maintain 40 mph the DCT will change back to 6th gear before I make it to the top. In these situations I have two more options, I can switch to Manual mode or Sport mode and that problem becomes moot.

There are many people who prefer to not get the DCT because they feel it takes something away from riding a bike, but for me, I loose nothing, it's win win all the way around. I can be as connected to the bike as I want (manual mode) or I can just point and twist letting the bike do the work for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I have to agree with El Gato. When I first got mine I kept it in "D" pretty much all the time, but as I got more familiar with the bike I found that different modes suited me better depending on what I was doing. Now I find myself changing modes all the time. You might be curious about why I would need to do this and to be completely straight about it, the shift points that the DCT takes is not always optimal for whatever situation is present at the moment. For instance, I find that the DCT shifts into 6th around 40 mph and that is fine if I'm just cruising, but if I try to accelerate at that speed in 6th or if I'm going up a hill (again at that speed) the engine lugs too much. I can toggle down a gear for better acceleration and that works well, but if I'm trying to go up a hill and maintain 40 mph the DCT will change back to 6th gear before I make it to the top. In these situations I have two more options, I can switch to Manual mode or Sport mode and that problem becomes moot.

There are many people who prefer to not get the DCT because they feel it takes something away from riding a bike, but for me, I loose nothing, it's win win all the way around. I can be as connected to the bike as I want (manual mode) or I can just point and twist letting the bike do the work for me.
I really hate reading stuff like this. Here I am trying to sell my NC700X and get a CTX700N MANUAL and you come along and type nothing but positives for the DCT. I hate you :x
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
I have to agree with El Gato. When I first got mine I kept it in "D" pretty much all the time, but as I got more familiar with the bike I found that different modes suited me better depending on what I was doing. Now I find myself changing modes all the time. You might be curious about why I would need to do this and to be completely straight about it, the shift points that the DCT takes is not always optimal for whatever situation is present at the moment. For instance, I find that the DCT shifts into 6th around 40 mph and that is fine if I'm just cruising, but if I try to accelerate at that speed in 6th or if I'm going up a hill (again at that speed) the engine lugs too much. I can toggle down a gear for better acceleration and that works well, but if I'm trying to go up a hill and maintain 40 mph the DCT will change back to 6th gear before I make it to the top. In these situations I have two more options, I can switch to Manual mode or Sport mode and that problem becomes moot.

There are many people who prefer to not get the DCT because they feel it takes something away from riding a bike, but for me, I loose nothing, it's win win all the way around. I can be as connected to the bike as I want (manual mode) or I can just point and twist letting the bike do the work for me.
Yep - you nailed it about the shift points in "D" mode...when I am going up and down winding hills, the bike keeps going into 6th and tries to stay there on the inclines...I end up downshifting a lot (its become a reflex now) but a lot of times I just put it into sport mode in those conditions and it keeps the bike rolling in just the right gear all the way through without any stuttering. Sport mode is very fun and it shifts pretty aggressively. What a great option. I love the paddle shifters. Sometimes I am in the mood for manual mode, it works great - and I do a lot of manual downshifting to either engine brake or give me more revs up a hill. And in heavy city traffic where you really need to concentrate and move carefully, not having to worry about shifting makes it a lot easier. Totally loving the versatility of the DCT.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
I really hate reading stuff like this. Here I am trying to sell my NC700X and get a CTX700N MANUAL and you come along and type nothing but positives for the DCT. I hate you :x
Well there is one thing...

With the DCT, if the battery dies you cannot push start it like the manual. So there you go, a valid reason to get the manual.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
How does the CXT700 DCT perform at slow speeds, say 15 to 25 mph?
Is there any engine lag, vibration, or hesitation?
Does it run smoothly while cruising at 25 mph?
My CTX700 DCT lurches an lags at anything below 9 or 10 mph. It acts more like a standard transmission at low speed with a gear that is too high. Without a clutch there is no friction zone. Low speed maneuvers are unsteady. DCT seems like a good idea, but this is a poor design. Or does my CTS 700 mry CTX need an adjustment?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
howdy and welcome to the forum
no motorcycle is perfect in all conditions of riding. i find, in general, that ones own technique is the answer to more situations. if you are in a situation where you need to be at the speeds you mentioned, the best answer is to put it in manual to hold the perfect gear for the parking lot which is what you seem to be talking about. i hold mine in low gear in those situations because in that speed zone it will have shifted up and leaves you in the wrong gear. just learn what it does that is inapropriate and learn how to compensate for those tendencies.
ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
My CTX700 DCT lurches an lags at anything below 9 or 10 mph. It acts more like a standard transmission at low speed with a gear that is too high. Without a clutch there is no friction zone. Low speed maneuvers are unsteady. DCT seems like a good idea, but this is a poor design. Or does my CTS 700 mry CTX need an adjustment?
New response to a three year old thread. I expect you'll get the answers you need by today. If not, you might want to start a new thread with the same question.
You might check or change the oil before paying for adjustments. Some say using cheap oil does not work well, but changing back to the good stuff as recommended in the owner's book should fix it.
Mine's manual, and rides beautifully at 2-5 MPH, but that's no help to you.
I've seen several other folks say the only thing keeping them above 2 MPH on a DCT is their ability to balance, and with a foot down the DCT can inch forward smoothly by feathering the rear brake while giving it about 2000 RPMs. The computer handles the clutch as well or better than humans can. The design and execution is excellent.

Edit: WAIT a minute, I must need more coffee, 9 MPH? I'll have to check, but I expect the clutch to be off by then and the only issue is which gear is best for the amount of power you need. Forget everything I said and listen to those who have a DCT. I'm off to go wake up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
I have no problem at all smoothly riding around a parking lot at a slow speed (or practicing U-turns on a two lane road). Assuming that the bike is working correctly (oil isn't old, bike doesn't have any fuel issues from sitting around or using non Top Tier Gasolines) try putting it in Sport mode so it keeps the RPM up a little higher.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
xx
howdy and welcome to the forum
no motorcycle is perfect in all conditions of riding. i find, in general, that ones own technique is the answer to more situations. if you are in a situation where you need to be at the speeds you mentioned, the best answer is to put it in manual to hold the perfect gear for the parking lot which is what you seem to be talking about. i hold mine in low gear in those situations because in that speed zone it will have shifted up and leaves you in the wrong gear. just learn what it does that is inapropriate and learn how to compensate for those tendencies.
ken
After reading thise posts
New response to a three year old thread. I expect you'll get the answers you need by today. If not, you might want to start a new thread with the same question.
You might check or change the oil before paying for adjustments. Some say using cheap oil does not work well, but changing back to the good stuff as recommended in the owner's book should fix it.
Mine's manual, and rides beautifully at 2-5 MPH, but that's no help to you.
I've seen several other folks say the only thing keeping them above 2 MPH on a DCT is their ability to balance, and with a foot down the DCT can inch forward smoothly by feathering the rear brake while giving it about 2000 RPMs. The computer handles the clutch as well or better than humans can. The design and execution is excellent.

Edit: WAIT a minute, I must need more coffee, 9 MPH? I'll have to check, but I expect the clutch to be off by then and the only issue is which gear is best for the amount of power you need. Forget everything I said and listen to those who have a DCT. I'm off to go wake up.
I thought proper forum etiquette was to see if a question had been asked in the past before posting a new thread.

I was told to use 9 mph, and it seems that this speed is in the area where the bike shifts, so based on comments here, I am now using a slower speed with plans to reduce it further.

I used manual this morning and it worked well.

I am getting more comfortable at slow speeds.

Which way should I lean in a tight turn?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I have no problem at all smoothly riding around a parking lot at a slow speed (or practicing U-turns on a two lane road). Assuming that the bike is working correctly (oil isn't old, bike doesn't have any fuel issues from sitting around or using non Top Tier Gasolines) try putting it in Sport mode so it keeps the RPM up a little higher.

Steve
tried Sport mode this morning.
 

·
Registered
2016 Honda CTX700 DCT
Joined
·
373 Posts
As a bike commuter in the Washington, DC area, I spend plenty of time in 0-25mph speeds, including on the highways (I bought the CTX700DCT specifically so I wouldn't have to constantly feather my clutch for 1-2 straight hours, which gave me bursitis one year and forced me to stop riding for a few years). The CTX700 is perfectly happy at low speeds when in D mode, the low center of gravity makes it easy for me to ride at parade speeds, and the low seat makes it just as easy to actually walk it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
"..................
Which way should I lean in a tight turn?
Don’t lean. Sit on the bike vertically and go. Maintain that alignment with the bike as you turn. The only people who lean are people who ride sport bikes and think they are showing their MotoGP “skills” even though none of them ride well enough to do that.
Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
As with any bike, check chain slack. With the DCT, idle speed is especially important (about 1200 rpm.) Also, I have found that setting throttle cable play to the minimum helps me control the bike at low speed (Honda recommends 2-6 mm.) You are controlling the clutch as well as the throttle, so roll it on gently. I found that doing the above, and with practice, the bike works fine for me. Some on this forum have added a Throttle Tamer. Do a search on this forum if you are interested.

As for those low speed, parking lot turns, check out YouTube. I like MCrider and MotoJitsu.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dgall

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
howdy and welcome to the forum
no motorcycle is perfect in all conditions of riding. i find, in general, that ones own technique is the answer to more situations. if you are in a situation where you need to be at the speeds you mentioned, the best answer is to put it in manual to hold the perfect gear for the parking lot which is what you seem to be talking about. i hold mine in low gear in those situations because in that speed zone it will have shifted up and leaves you in the wrong gear. just learn what it does that is inapropriate and learn how to compensate for those tendencies.
ken
After reading the posts here obvious conclusion is that I was doing something wrong. The speed I chose was at that range where the motorcycle wanted to shift gears. When your post came up, I tried using manual. Thank you for the suggestion. Now I’m working on riding in a slower speed to go through the con wave
 
21 - 40 of 64 Posts
Top