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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Battery: Super Start 12V. Model BTZ13S
*LED Neon light strip: 1.2 amps
*Underglow Show lights: 1.5 amps
LED Cool White Headlight: 2 amps?
**Will be installing Oxford Heated Grips: 4 amps
EDIT: USB socket to charge iPhone: 1.5 amps
total of 8.7 amps and 10.2 amps after edit.

*Will only use at nighttime no longer than 1 hour continuously, rarely will I do longer drives at night.
**Will only use in colder weather.

I’ll assume I’m drawing 6-8 amps continuously each time I ride.

i forgot to mention that I have a cig socket installed that would draw 1.5 amps when charging my iPhone
 

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It's a good idea to add a voltmeter of some kind. That way no matter which combination of accessories you run you'll know exactly what your charging system is doing.

My old 1986 Honda went through a regulator rectifier and left me stranded. Ever since that unpleasant learning experience, a cheap voltmeter connected to a switched power source (that turned on when the key was turned on) went on all of my bikes.

If memory serves: a healthy battery is about 12.5 volts on its own. While riding the voltage should read about 13.7-14.7 volts. Anything well below or above that is indicative of a problem that needs to be investigated.

-Sloppy
 

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The Honda aux power harness is rated at 7 amps. The accessory socket in the glove box is 1 amp. Don't overload your circuits since the charging system and wiring harness are very expensive and hard to replace. You may want to add another fuse box and relay to switch additional circuits. Heated grips definitely are a big drain and must use switched power to keep from discharging your battery when parked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Honda aux power harness is rated at 7 amps. The accessory socket in the glove box is 1 amp. Don't overload your circuits since the charging system and wiring harness are very expensive and hard to replace. You may want to add another fuse box and relay to switch additional circuits. Heated grips definitely are a big drain and must use switched power to keep from discharging your battery when parked.
I have a separate switched circut fuse box. Installed some time ago. I do appreciate the concern though :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's a good idea to add a voltmeter of some kind. That way no matter which combination of accessories you run you'll know exactly what your charging system is doing.

My old 1986 Honda went through a regulator rectifier and left me stranded. Ever since that unpleasant learning experience, a cheap voltmeter connected to a switched power source (that turned on when the key was turned on) went on all of my bikes.

If memory serves: a healthy battery is about 12.5 volts on its own. While riding the voltage should read about 13.7-14.7 volts. Anything well below or above that is indicative of a problem that needs to be investigated.

-Sloppy
I installed another cig socket that has a built in voltmeter I believe. Before starting up the bike it’s at 12.4V. After starting up it stayed steady at 14.4 I believe. I know that value is somewhere there I might just be off by +/-0.2
 

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Assuming you have correctly connected your intended equipment to the main electrical circuit, the principle is that the alternator must continue to charge the battery, no matter how much load is connected, especially at idle speed. But to know this, you need to measure whether the battery is being charged or discharged. Measuring only the voltage is insufficient. You should measure the polarity of the current in the battery circuit. So the ammeter must be connected to the battery circuit.
 

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Vehicular batteries are design rated for 12.6 volts. (6 internal cells producing 2.1 volts per cell)

Over 14.0 volts while running is normal as it indicates the charging system (stator, alternator etc) is doing its job.
 

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If the alternator (as noted elsewhere) is rated at 420 watts, then it’s output would be approximately 28 1/4 amps (420/14.5). 80% of that would be roughly 22.5 amps. That would represent the maximum continuous load. Intermittent loads would typically be 2 minutes or less. With leds you should be fine.
 

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All on the same circuit? Likely will be an issue. On different circuits using a switched fuse block distribution? Probably be ok but double check the charging level as stated above.
 

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Page 1-11 of the service manual has alternator “capacity @ 0.45 kW/5,000 rpm. With out having any other data so far as usage required to run the bike and max output it would be hard to determine if you were overloading the charging system. The simplest and easiest way to gauge load would be to start the bike and check voltage with none of the accessories running in a dark garage watching the head light and see what voltage is running thru the battery. Then turn on the accessories and see what the voltage drop on the battery is and with everything running the headlight doesn’t go dim. If the headlight goes significantly dim and the voltage running through the battery drops below what it would take to keep it charged you are over driving the charging system. Remember the advice you get over the internet is only as good as the price you paid for it.
 

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...The simplest and easiest way to gauge load would be to start the bike and check voltage with none of the accessories running in a dark garage watching the head light and see what voltage is running thru the battery. Then turn on the accessories and see what the voltage drop on the battery is and with everything running the headlight doesn’t go dim. If the headlight goes significantly dim and the voltage running through the battery drops below what it would take to keep it charged you are over driving the charging system. Remember the advice you get over the internet is only as good as the price you paid for it.
It is hard to believe that anyone could rely on such a method to determine if the battery charging system is overloaded.
A mistake can be quite costly if you get stuck somewhere in the middle of nowhere with a discharged battery.
No offense, but we live in the 21st century and the methods of measuring the direction of the current flow have been known for well over 100 years. And today you will get a simple but sufficient measuring device for $15 to $35.
 

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Agreed, that is NOT the way to test if you're over loading the charging system.
Again, IF all the posted numbers as to the charging system output is/are correct ( I do not know the spec), then you want all your electrical demands to be 80% of that.
Sure you can go to 90% or more,
but then you may be on a road 300 miles for home,
in the dark and the wires are very hot from over loading,
and one bump in the road causes a hot wire to rub against a rough/sharp area,
the wire becomes exposed and it hits the frame and POP the fuse blows......
 

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...Again, IF all the posted numbers as to the charging system output is/are correct ( I do not know the spec), then you want all your electrical demands to be 80% of that.
Sure you can go to 90% or more...
I don't understand where this "80% of the electrical demand" came from? It has no technical backing. 80% of what?
The only thing we know about the alternator on the CTX is that its capacity is 450W/5000 rpm. But we do not know what the idle capacity is (about 1300-1600 rpm), and this is when problems with sufficient battery charging can happen.
So why rely on non-technical speculation? Measuring the direction of a current flow is the simplest and most efficient method. It is less important in this case what is the current in the charging circuit but whether the battery is being charged or discharged.
 

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"It is less important in this case what is the current in the charging circuit but whether the battery is being charged or discharged. "
What??
Knowing what the charging system can output is what you need to know to figure out if you can use up any more amp draw on your added parts!
The battery needs to stay charged and the wiring needs to stay away from heavy loads so they do not melt!!!

If your 450 watts statement is accurate then there are 37 amps to use.
Then you need to know what is being used on the bike from the factory installed parts - headlight, charging circuit, ignition, any other lights, ect...
80% of available watts after you subtract the factory amp draw seems valid and I believe it was posted above.

IF bike is using up 250 watts ( DONT USE this its an example)
why not try and keep under 80% of that total (200 * .8 = 160 watts) so that you dont damage any wiring by overheating??
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
There are answers that are over my league and knowledge. Maybe I should do some research before driving the ctx700 for long drives. I do appreciate your answers and WILL take them in consideration to understand more about my electrical system
 
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