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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This Hyperlink will direct you to a quick video of me checking the slack of the chain. I feel like it may be a bit too tight. It was pretty loose beforehand so while I was cleaning her, I’d adjust slack
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks good to me.I also move the tire and check it.Some times you will find it's tighter in some areas.jasperj
Thank you! Something weird is going on after torquing my rear axel nut.. there is a click click sound coming from the rear wheel and chain area. I hear it after the ride is done and when moving my motorcycle manually without the engine. Could it be that the torque settings (72) is settling in? My chain is still at the same tension. A little nervous to ride at high speeds
 

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Check your chain alignment, it maybe slightly out of alignment with the front sprocket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Check your chain alignment, it maybe slightly out of alignment with the front sprocket.
Well, Ill let you know what I did. On its side stand, I loosened the rear axle nut and took off the nut (probably shouldn’t have?) and then loosened up both sides of the chain adjusters all the way until the metal covers were loose- I then tightened both sides just enough for the metal covers to stay put, that way I can have a equal basis on both sides to tighten. I then tightened maybe half a turn on both sides and achieved my desired chain slack. Then I torqued my rear axle nut back to 72 ft lbs of torque while having a wrench on the other side to make it easier and not just a freely spinning nut.

Anyway, that’s when I noticed the clicky sound whenever I move the motorcycle without the engine. Thinking that the rear axle nut was very dry (don’t have have grease), I re-torqued it to 64 ft lb of torque but I STILL hear the clicky noise.

I’ll make sure to put it on a stand tomorrow and check the chain alignment.
 

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1. Wheel bearings: Lift the rear wheel, try to move the wheel side to side with your hands, rotate 45 degrees and then try to move it again. It shouldn't move at all. If there is slack, it's a wheel bearing gone bad and it's super important that you replace it immediately (lesson learned the hard way at just 20k miles, due to a mechanic overtorquing the rear wheel which crushed the bearing)
2. Brake caliper: Lift the rear wheel, rotate the wheel or turn the engine on and put the bike in gear so it rotates of its own. Then make sure that the brake caliper doesn't vibrate/move. If it does move, this could indicate a bent rotor or a bad wheel bearing even if the above (1) test has passed.
3. Wheel out of alignment. The easiest way to make sure the wheel is aligned is to go to the adjustment nuts and measure the length of the threads that sticks out on each side, it should be the same. There's many methods to check the alignment but I've found this one to be the most accurate and also the quickest without needing extra tools.
4. A stiff chain link.
5. The brake caliper. A rusty/dirty piston fails to retract completely, similar to (2) but not quite the same issue.
6. When adjusting the chain I understand you have to go back and forth several times ie. tighten and loosen until you achieve the desired slack and alignment. Did you push the wheel or put something like a screwdriver to the chain and then rotate the wheel to tighten the chain so that the adjuster plates don't rattle? It'd be funny if that's the actual issue, ie. the adjuster plates weren't tight when you torqued the axle nut and that's what makes the noise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
3. Wheel out of alignment. The easiest way to make sure the wheel is aligned is to go to the adjustment nuts and measure the length of the threads that sticks out on each side, it should be the same. There's many methods to check the alignment but I've found this one to be the most accurate and also the quickest without needing extra tools.
the lengths of the threads that come out on each side is equal, at the least in the most closest way I can.
Automotive tire Helmet Yellow Wood Tints and shades
Line Wood Gas Auto part Machine

Now look at what happens to the swingarm markings

Crankset Automotive tire Bicycle part Rim Vehicle brake
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle brake


Which then throws off my alignment markings.
Tire Automotive tire Wheel Automotive design Motor vehicle
 

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The wheel is out of alignment, the right remaining thread is abt 1.3mm shorter.

After you fix this, make sure you stick a screwdriver or a towel between the chain and the sprocket (bottom side) and turn the wheel forward to lock it in place, use "some" force. This will push the wheel as needed to tighten the metallic plates that cover the ends of the swingarm and will prevent the noise. Also it will make sure that your wheel is actually aligned.

It's not just adjusting the nuts, it's also pushing the wheel to adopt to the adjustments. Then, I'm sure your chain alignment tool will verify that it's straight.
 
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