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What's the deal with the CTX700's exhaust? It's big, straight, low and distracting. Anyone looking at alternatives?
 

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Personally I think it looks just fine. I wouldn't change it if I were to get one. I've seen plenty of other bikes that had rather distracting/obnoxious exhausts, and CTX700 is not one of them, IMO. It's all subjective, I guess.
 

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Having the exhaust canister side-mounted so low is clearly inspired by cruisers. If you don't want your CTX looking like a cruiser, there are always aftermarket exhausts available. You can get them in aluminium, titanium, steel or carbon fiber, just Google around.
 

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What's the deal with the CTX700's exhaust? It's big, straight, low and distracting. Anyone looking at alternatives?
The deal is they made it that way. low is good to keep the weight down, second it is stainless steel not chrome, so it will last longer, third Honda must meet guidelines on noise so all bikes are getting bigger mufflers. Look at the new FZ9 Yamaha for example.f

When I ride my CTX I can't really see the stovepipe so I don't find it distracting.

Some may look for alternatives but for what the CTX is, I think only a few will opt to spend the large amount of money aftermarket systems sell for.
 

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Having the exhaust canister side-mounted so low is clearly inspired by cruisers. If you don't want your CTX looking like a cruiser, there are always aftermarket exhausts available. You can get them in aluminium, titanium, steel or carbon fiber, just Google around.
Have you heard? This is a new model. It will take awhile for exhaust makers to fabricate and make a viable exhaust. Bikes that have been around have all flavors you mentioned but I like the stovepipe made of stainless steel and straight through is not a bad reason for it being straight. Take a look at the New Yamaha FZ9 muffler.

Gee I thought most forward controls were on cruisers. What?, can I get rear sets and clubman bars for it now so it looks like a café bike. I had one of those before my CTX.

to each their own but you cant make a bike what it is not unless you change it with large amounts of money and time. My opinion just like yours above. Happy looking for your next bike.
 

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The only complaint I'd have about the exhaust has only to do with appearance, and its that it doesn't follow the black theme of the bike, but that's just a minor, personal observation. Not a big deal whatsoever. It's pretty common I guess, just like with cars, that high quality exhausts are stainless steel, so a black pipe, I'm assuming wouldn't be as durable.
 

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I haven't got ours yet so I couild be wrong but most polished stainless mufflers are actually an outer shell or decorative heat shield.
 

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I haven't got ours yet so I couild be wrong but most polished stainless mufflers are actually an outer shell or decorative heat shield.
yes, I bet the guts of the thing are just steel and the outer shell is all that is stainless. I believe the pipe is under the bike too. It does tend to rust less and clean up well with very fine steel wool after some years.
 

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What's the deal with the CTX700's exhaust? It's big, straight, low and distracting. Anyone looking at alternatives?
Straight and low works for me because I mounted Cortech saddlebags on my CTX and I don't have to worry about the right side bag getting too close to the exhaust. I also like the sound of the exhaust--kind of mellow without being loud or obnoxious.

As for comments I have heard about the looks of the bike here and elsewhere, I can't see the bike when I'm riding it. I can only feel it and it feels great.

Don
 

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Every criticism of the exhaust system zeros in on appearance, but no mention of the WEIGHT. One look at that photo of the "naked-naked" CTX screams out WEIGHT. Ok, a lighter system will only raise the CG, but that's not a major issue with this particular machine. Lighter means more pick-up and even better gas mileage. The low position makes it easy to fit larger hard luggage, which in turn help reduce damage when you come down. Those big hard bags can also help you exit gracefully. Don't ask how I know this.
Not sure about the weight involved in the catalytic converter which is now mandatory, but I ended up with a stainless system on the CBX which was less than half the weight of the original system, and quiet enough to get away with a cursory roadside inspection.
 

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This is an odd phenomenon to me being a beginner. Some state it is way to heavy and some state it is very light and just barely heavy enough to make it a stable highway cruiser. Could it be that some are viewing it from a perspective of sport bikes and others from the perspective of touring bikes and super maxi scooters?

It weighs 100 lbs more than my scooter and is over double the cc's., so it's roughly 25% heavier. To me it seems about right, because the scooter strikes a good balance, but I don't know much. Just speculating what's going on here to explain the dichotomy of the opinions with regards to weight and CG. Someone with experience with lots of different styles of bikes under his or her belt please weigh in on this; no pun intended.
 

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Hi Greg, I was only referring to the weight of the actual exhaust system on the CTX, and how people were just criticising it on appearance alone. Many owners or potential owners just want it louder, which of course is illegal. We all do it at some stage, but it brings unwanted attention. I’d be interested in a lighter aftermarket system that looks and sounds the same as the genuine article. Then, should the bike get sold, the original system in new or near new condition, will add considerably to its value. Of more importance, on change of ownership many states now will not register a motorcycle unless it has the original exhaust system fitted. This puts every second bike out there at risk of getting a defect notice. My only experience with Honda exhausts is the CBX, and they rust out fast. Biggest culprit is starting up just to demonstrate the fabulous sound, then shutting down…it’s irresistible. It makes an older bike almost un-saleable unless just for collection purposes. So therefore, you may have to consider an aftermarket system and keep the original as a selling point. When we first got cars (you needed one when girls came along) there was a lot of swapping of wheels at registration time. The streets were quieter then and speeds much slower, so most of us survived. Same may be the way bikes are traded today. That one genuine system may find its way onto several machines at rego time. I’ve never done either of those things of course, but I believe others have.

Your other question is of more interest, namely the overall weight of the CTX. It now intrigues me as to what makes this bike so heavy. It’s within a pound or two of my six-cylinder, 100 horsepower CBX. Thirty years of refinement have seen cars lighter and much safer. Same can’t be said for bikes. Why is that so? What else besides the exhaust is making the CTX so heavy? We know the DCT adds 20 odd pounds and water cooling adds weight, but plastic can’t be that heavy?

Lastly a potted history of motorcycle dynamics. Here is a list of excellent books which are a must for any motorcyclist’s library, and there must be many more.

Motorcycle Chassis Design by Tony Foale ISBN 0-85045-560-X
Motorcycle Chassis Tuning by John Robinson ISBN 0-7506-0798-X
Engineer to Win by Carroll Smith ISBN 0-85045-628-2
Sportbike Performance Handbook by Kevin Cameron ISBN 0-7603-0229-4
Wobble, Wallow & Weave by Mac McDiarmid (A lift-out attached to the April 1992 issue of SuperBike)
Motorcycle Engineering by P.E. Irving (Temple Press, London, but prior to ISBN listing)
Tuning for Speed by P.E. Irving (Temple Press, London, but prior to ISBN listing)
Anything else by Irving you can lay your hands on.
Motorcycle Efficiency and how to obtain it (Temple Press, London, but prior to ISBN listing)
Motorcyclist’s Workshop by “Torrens” of the Motorcyclist (Iliffe & Sons, London, but prior to ISBN listing)
Twistgrip by L.J.K. Setright SBN 04-796031-O (Fabulous & amusing short motorcycling stories)
Anything else by Setright you can lay your hands on.
Honda Production Motorcycles by **** Walker ISBN 1-86126-820-3
Any other books about motorcycling you can pick up at swap-meets
Any other magazines about motorcycling you can pick up at swap-meets

Cheers…Tom
 

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Gregsfc, I already posted about the muffler but this is about the bike weight.

I think the crude steel frame is where most of the weight is. For a 50+Hp bike of prior years the cruiser 500 and 750 V twins were heavy and had steel frames. Sport bikes and Ninja bikes compete on performance and weight was critical. So along came many 1000cc sport bikes that are 50 pounds lighter than the CTX and have 150HP. They are expensive to make, insure and maintain but really get your juices going. My old 88 Hawk had an aluminum frame and single sided swing arm 50+HP and weighted 400lbs. My VFR 800 V4 with 110 hp dual exhaust and full fairings at 470lbs again aluminum frame and single sided swing arm. On the ctx, Honda covers much of the frame with plastic so it is hidden and good reason. It is no work of art but probably well engineered. It is not light. This is what I think based on what I see under the seat.
 

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Gregsfc, I already posted about the muffler but this is about the bike weight.

I think the crude steel frame is where most of the weight is.
Thanks Bill. I remember now about you writing something about the steel frame in a prior post. I guess it was to keep costs down but adds to weight, but still lots of reviews both consumer and journalists referring to how it is light and nimble this bike is; where are these folks coming from? what are they comparing it too, or does it just have more to do with it feeling lighter than the specs indicate due to the low CG?

Thanks OldTom for your explanation. I've never thought about weight of the exhaust itself. Being a novice to the world of motorcycling, even though your explanation was extremely detailed and thorough, I still don't quite get the significance of it, but the library of dynamics will surely help me understand the big picture.
 

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I am new here. I have had my CTXn for 6 days. In that time I have put 857 miles on it. I love it. It has been great. I commute about 100 miles one way a few days a week. Almost all of it is interstate. I had the oil changed and everything checked out at 600 miles by the dealer. I love the look of the bike, and the exhaust. My only complaint is the sound, or lack of. I have found that a little noise is good in making others aware of your presence. Are there any options to give this bike a little more volume?
 

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Thanks Bill. I remember now about you writing something about the steel frame in a prior post. I guess it was to keep costs down but adds to weight, but still lots of reviews both consumer and journalists referring to how it is light and nimble this bike is; where are these folks coming from? what are they comparing it too, or does it just have more to do with it feeling lighter than the specs indicate due to the low CG?

more comments on weight (which is just my view and I am no expert).

A bike can be heavier than it needs to be and Aluminum frames cost more than steal tubing. Honda did a great job of making a middle weight bike feel lightweight. In the past sport bikes proved weight could come off at a cost. Cruiser bikes proved horsepower could move weight and weight translates to smoother freeway driving.

Back to the CTX, tried to make it light in weight but had a limit based on costs but I see these weight reduction areas. There is no frame under the engine (not needed), there is one intake and exhaust (on a twin), They made fenders out of plastic. They used lightweight wheels. This got them down tot a ballpark weight but not lightweight.

But Honda did something special, they made it FEEL lighter than it actually is by having sloped cylinders which place the weight lower. Older bikes and some new ones have tall engines so are heavy feeling if not heavy anyway. The low seat means riders can get their legs out away from the bike giving more leverage to hold it up easily. And any one who has rode a Café or sport bike knows how narrow the bars are and how heave those bikes can feel if leaned over at a stop so the wide bars act like large pry bars and make it easy to control when at slow speed or stopped.

so all this comes out in as "nimble and flickable in corners" type reviews and they tell the truth. The CTX is easy to ride. so where is the down side. There probably isn't any if you take the bike for what it is.
 

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Bill, I agree 100%. Honda did a GREAT job with balancing the CTX. I could not believe it weighed 500 lbs and how easy it is to maneuver.
 

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skip sound: go for V I S I B I L I T Y

I am new here. I have had my CTXn for 6 days. In that time I have put 857 miles on it. I love it. It has been great. I commute about 100 miles one way a few days a week. Almost all of it is interstate. I had the oil changed and everything checked out at 600 miles by the dealer. I love the look of the bike, and the exhaust. My only complaint is the sound, or lack of. I have found that a little noise is good in making others aware of your presence. Are there any options to give this bike a little more volume?
at only 670cc's producing what... 50HP(?), the CTX700 simply won't produce enough noise to make it "bad-ass" noticable. I added headlight modulator legal in all 50 states. This is a cager attention getter, and saves me far more than any exhaust sound ever did.

My last bike was a 2005 Honda VTX1800C with a mean set of after market pipes rumbling out a solid and intimidating exhaust note. But the cagers felt my "presence in the force" more from the sheer size of my 900 pound black and chrome girth, than they did from hearing my bike rumble. At freeway speeds overtaking cagers, they will not be able to hear you. BUT if your headlamp is blasting them in their rear view mirrors and lighting up the interior of their car... they will sense you are there and look for the flashing point of origin. This works for me every day commuting here in Kahlifornya.

Additionally, buy reflective day-glow gear. I have a neon yellow Kilamanjaro riding jacket. If they had a day-glow Shoei Qwest helmet when I bought mine I would have selected if over black. VISUAL DISTINCTION is greater than audible detection on the freeway
 
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