CTX 700 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For how long do you usually warm up the engine? And how? Just idling or moving at 10-15mph for several minutes. We have about 28 F in the mornings and I don't have a garage so I usually warm up for 5 mins and wait until idle RPM is stabilized at 1200 (as it is stated in manual). Do you thing that's enough? Please share your experience how you do warm up?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
795 Posts
It was 37 degrees Friday. I usually start it after I put on my leather over pants and let it warm up while I put on my ski mask, helmet, jacket liner, leather jacket and gloves. So that is a couple of minutes. I don't get on freeway going to work so only doing 25-50 on city streets.

Because I have a clutch and most bikes I have owned clunk really bad the first time I poke it into first gear, I cheat. I kill the engine with the kill button, rock the bike to get it into first gear while holding in the clutch, then I rock it back some to make sure clutch is free (all this takes about 10 seconds) then I start it back up in gear and never a clunk. Just a habit that I continue. Of course not needed with the DCT .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
975 Posts
I don't think a single OEM (car or bike) with a fuel injection system recommends warming an engine by idling beyond the point to where the RPM stabilizes, which is really more like a few seconds than a few minutes. For me, I rode twice this week to work at or below 20 degrees farenheit and found that the idling evened out just after a few seconds. I took off slowly and easily until I got to the highway (about .5 mile). Accelerated a little slower than normal up to speed, and rode normally after that. That's all I'm going to do differently unless I learn something new about modern engines.

It is my opinion that excessive idling, especially in cold weather, has no advantage whatsoever on a fuel-injected bike and has no advantage in a car other than to pamper our asses. Idling in extreme cold can cause coking of the injection system; warms only the engine while the other systems are still cold; pollutes and wastes gas unnecessarily; puts an excess strain on the exhaust treatment system; and has no advantage from a maintenance standpoint to the best way to warm a vehicle. And that is to start off slowly and easily until all the systems have a chance to warm up simultaneously. And that is not as long as many think. Even my diesel car is good after just a couple of minutes of just sort of taking it easy; not giving it much throttle so as not to force alot of fuel into the chambers before the system is warmed up; and not running the RPM too high before it is well lubricated and the engine is ready to handle the high revolutions. My diesel is very thermally efficient; takes about 3 miles at highway speeds for the coolant to warm up to about 145. I've started it and ran it in the cold for 8 1/2 years and 135,000 miles and not had a single problem starting and going. If a diesel does well without warming, certainly a gas-powered vehicle can handle it, because they warm up so much faster. That's my theory anyway. Vulcan would say it's my philosophy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Seems like I read somewhere to let bikes warm up no longer than five minutes, but long enough for the oil to circulate into the engine and clutch areas...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
No automotive engineer I know (and I know more than a dozen) recommends warming up an engine for more than 5 - 10 seconds. Some scorn even that length. So I start mine, flip down the face shield and take off, riding GENTLY for the first 1 -2 miles.

Said engineers claim that the most engine wear occurs in the first two minutes the engine is run, when the oil is cold. The idea behind driving very shortly after startup is to put light forces into the engine to warm the oil up faster. Idling an engine for a few minutes right after you start doesn't affect oil temp much and therefore actually increases wear. Counterintuitive, ain't it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
I just start mine as I back out of the garage. Then I hit the garage door button in my jacket and go. I think it idles ten to fifteen seconds.

When I leave work I don't have to back up, so I just start it and go.

It's so nice to have a Honda that just goes down the road with no drama. I wish the Triumph was half as easy to get going. Some days, the Triumph won't go at all. What a waste of money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I just start mine as I back out of the garage. Then I hit the garage door button in my jacket and go. I think it idles ten to fifteen seconds.

When I leave work I don't have to back up, so I just start it and go.

It's so nice to have a Honda that just goes down the road with no drama. I wish the Triumph was half as easy to get going. Some days, the Triumph won't go at all. What a waste of money.
Hate to hear that about the Triumph Trophy. Great looking bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
842 Posts
No warm up needed for modern engines. I do everything according to the book and the dealer service recommendations.

Start it, back out of garage, go. With today's oils, bearings, precision tolerances, CAD-CAM designs, there is no need for a warm up.

Old wive's tale that needs to wither away...

Ride Often, Ride Safe
f
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Gentlemen, I can believe that that's no need to warm up when it's 70-80 F outside. But what about 20-30 F? Today was 32 and RPM stabilized only in 3 mins. Anyway oil (I have SAE 10W-40) should be warm enough for proper lubrication.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Gentlemen, I can believe that that's no need to warm up when it's 70-80 F outside. But what about 20-30 F? Today was 32 and RPM stabilized only in 3 mins. Anyway oil (I have SAE 10W-40) should be warm enough for proper lubrication.
My Vulcan 500 is cold-natured and needs to warm up a few minutes when cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
My Vulcan 500 is cold-natured and needs to warm up a few minutes when cold.
That's what I'm asking about. Does it make sense to warm up in winter, say 20-30 F at night. But your Vulcan is carburated (not fuel injected), so you probably have to warm up to run without choke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
True. Old technology, but still a bullet proof engine (modified Ninja 500 engine).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
975 Posts
Gentlemen, I can believe that that's no need to warm up when it's 70-80 F outside. But what about 20-30 F? Today was 32 and RPM stabilized only in 3 mins. Anyway oil (I have SAE 10W-40) should be warm enough for proper lubrication.
I don't want to speak for everyone else, but I think all of us in the "don't idle the engine to warm up" camp, don't warm our vehicles by idling no matter how cold it is outside.

I don't live in an area that gets extreme cold often, but I've always just started them; let vehicles run about 10 seconds and then start out slowly. I've done this down to minus 5 degrees farenheit. I've always gotten long, durable, trouble free engine service out of all my vehicles operating this way.

What I do though, is the colder it is, the easier I am when I first put the vehicle in motion, and the longer I operate it in this easy-going fashion. I use the water temp gauge usually. When I first detect movement of the needle, I start driving or riding normally, but the CTX doesn't have one.

I can say that for a modern diesel with common rail or unit injection, it can be absolutely devastating on the fuel system to let it idle at normal idle in cold weather. It will coke the combustion chambers and the manuals warn against doing this. One should either start out driving easy or set the idle high. The guys I work with don't believe me about this, even though it is in the manual, and they'll start our distribution trucks, immediately drive them normally (they won't drive them easy upon cold start), and then they'll let them idle normally even in the coldest of temps. We have lots of fuel-system problems with both of our International trucks. Can't say for sure that the way we improperly operate them is the culprit, but it can't be helping.

Anyway for gas-powered, fuel-injected engines, like I eluded to above, if anyone can find a service or operators manual that recommends idling for an extended period (more than one minute) for any fuel injected vehicle, for the purpose of warming that vehicle up, please post it on here. I've never seen it. If you warm the engine, you've still got a cold transmission, wheel hubs, clutch, etc. You can't warm all the vehicle systems by idling the engine, and riding or driving will warm the engine faster, so why idle it to warm it?

I've got Motul 10W40 Semi synthetic. A slow, easy start will warm the oil and start engine lubrication without wearing the engine any more than idling according to most engineer-minded experts.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top