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I have never driven a DCT equipped bike and I have a question. If you were driving at any speed, can you shift to neutral instantly or is there a slight delay in the power being sent to the wheel. Reason I ask is I had an incident today that was a little hairy. I was topping a slight grade at about 50 mph because I could see the top of a Combine ahead of me. Some of these have 30 foot wide heads on them and if meeting a car there is no were to go. Unfortunately as I topped the hill I was shocked to see that there was oil all over the road. He had blown a hydrauic hose and the road was covered. He was stopped and just getting out of the machine. I had no chance to slow or get around it so I gambled and pulled the clutch and let the bike roll through it. If there had been any engine bracking at all, I would have lost all control. Luckily I was able to relax and let the bike go straight through and coasted down the road until I couldlet it run off the pavement onto the gravel shoulder. Got it stopped safely, checked my shorts, and walked back to assist the farmer. He was calling the fire department to wash the road down and police were also called . When everything cleared I drove a couple of miles slowly on the shoulder to clean the oil off the tires. Withthe clutch this was a lifesaver but it made me wonder if the DCT could be disengaged instantly also.
 

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This is something I haven't tried, but I believe I read that if you go into neutral while moving in a higher gear, it will go to neutral, but won't go back into D or S until the bike comes to a complete stop. If that is the case, it would have performed as you did with your manual. If I'm wrong, someone correct me, but I believe this is the way it works. You can switch Auto/Man or toggle D/S back and forth under motion, but once in neutral it would want first gear, and doesn't know how fast you're going, so it won't allow it. Glad you safely negotiated this predicament.:eek:
 

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This is something I haven't tried, but I believe I read that if you go into neutral while moving in a higher gear, it will go to neutral, but won't go back into D or S until the bike comes to a complete stop. If that is the case, it would have performed as you did with your manual. If I'm wrong, someone correct me, but I believe this is the way it works. You can switch Auto/Man or toggle D/S back and forth under motion, but once in neutral it would want first gear, and doesn't know how fast you're going, so it won't allow it. Glad you safely negotiated this predicament.:eek:
This is exactly what I understands happens with the DCT. Though I have not tried it myself...
 

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I also don't know-but because it might be hard to estimate the speed of such a large vehicle-I try to keep my distance in feet to half of the speed I'm doing-but you had all that oil you weren't expecting-glad you made it-just wonder was there enough of a shoulder to pass on the right once you realized he was stopped? Was there oil on the should too? Keep safe!
 

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I thought I read in the owners manual that you cannot engage neutral if the wheels are turning. I had my DCT on the CS running and had to apply the rear brake to stop the wheel from turning before I could switch to neutral.
 

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howdy from over a cup of coffee
i have tried to get to neutral from all speeds-i think- and it isn't doable. so, the only thing to do there is carefully keep throttle to where it won't pull or decelerate. that's not going to work well if you are changing speeds going through the oil patch because the transmission will change gear down if you pass through that speed.
i really like the question because it should force every one who reads it to consider what to do and have a plan for that happening or similar. i came on something similar on the freeway where construction was being done and it was raining which washed the mud out on the road. i did a few tank slappers while getting my feet down from the turn signal stalks and behind the bates handlebar fairing where they were to keep the shoes from getting soaked. how come i can forget what i had for lunch but never forget that happening about 50 years ago? the black bates fairing was on the cb450 honda because i had rudely interrupted a yellow jacket on his journey across that same freeway the year before.

ken
 

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TIP: Glad you made it through unscathed. I suspect 999 out of a thousand times that doesn't end well.

CTXDAWG: God I wish there was a commercially available batwing like fairing for the naked....
 

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I thought I read in the owners manual that you cannot engage neutral if the wheels are turning. I had my DCT on the CS running and had to apply the rear brake to stop the wheel from turning before I could switch to neutral.
Yeah, this would make more sense for safety reasons. Would hate to inadvertently hit the Neutral switch out in the passing lane and have the bike coast to a stop... :oops:. Thanks Phillip and Ken for clearing this up. Now with my arthritic fingers, I only have to avoid the kill switch.:cautious:
 
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Yeah, this would make more sense for safety reasons. Would hate to inadvertently hit the Neutral switch out in the passing lane and have the bike coast to a stop... :oops:. Thanks Phillip and Ken for clearing this up. Now with my arthritic fingers, I only have to avoid the kill switch.:cautious:
I also thought right away that it would not go in to neutral until you had stopped. You can though hit the kill switch and it will kill the engine but not lock it up. Don't ask how I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ira, the combine was stopped on the shoulder of the road when I got over the hill. He had just pulled over as fsr as he could. The head of the combine was still in the middle of the road but I had moved to the passing portion. There was no oil on the shoulder ahead of the combine. Farmers usually drop the head on a special built trailer and pull it down the road the long way that makes the machine much narrower, but still overwidth. In this case as a lot of farmers do he was just moving from 1 field to another so they would not take the time to uncouple the head and tow it. This happens a lot with the large machinery they use today. Most have up to 60 foot cultivators which for road use hydraulically fold up but they still are probably close to 20 wide. They usually run one set of wheels on the shoulder as close to the ditch as possible but they still take up a good part of the road. Most times they try to travel on secondary roads when traveling from farm to farm. It is quite common to have to pull your car into a driveway when meeting them. When I was young farms were mostly 100 acres but now they have 2000 to 6000 acres or so. The day of the small family farm is gone. They are now like factory farms. Farms around my area sell for 15 to 20000 dollars per acre. They milk 500 to 1000 cows with robots. We are talking upward to 1 or 2 hundred millon dollars with machinery, stock, automated barns and such. Makes you wonder were it will it end.
 

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Glad you made it safely. A recent post about riding thru gravel reminded me of a time when my Mrs. & I (on separate bikes) unexpectedly encountered a long stretch of gravel where the pavement had been removed during road repair. We both recalled advice from a veteran riding friend who said; do not make any sudden adjustments or movements...slow before if possible, then maintain a steady throttle (no brake), & accelerate just a wee bit if you feel you are losing control... maybe kinda like an off road rider in loose dirt or sand. Anyway, we made it & learned a bit more of what our bikes are capable of doing, as long as we don't panic at the unexpected.;)
With DCT it may help to switch to manual mode to avoid an unwanted automatic shift.
 

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So, I can’t understand why these experienced riders haven’t just said, let all the way off the throttle when you’re about to hit a road slick? Wouldn’t that effectively be neutral, with no power going to the wheel? Even when the bike starts downshifting, it’s not applying the throttle to do so, right? I’m gonna go off my instinct here: I’m wrong, because nobody else suggested it. So help me out, where is my thought process awry?
 

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So, I can’t understand why these experienced riders haven’t just said, let all the way off the throttle when you’re about to hit a road slick? Wouldn’t that effectively be neutral, with no power going to the wheel? Even when the bike starts downshifting, it’s not applying the throttle to do so, right? I’m gonna go off my instinct here: I’m wrong, because nobody else suggested it. So help me out, where is my thought process awry?
Letting off the throttle will cause you to decelerate. The extra load of the engine slowing you down causes your center of gravity to move forward. This is bad when you start to lose traction (as would happen in this case), and is more likely to have your back end try to pass your front end.... On a manual you can use the clutch to disengage the motor and allow your natural momentum to carry you through without changing your center of gravity.
 

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Letting off the throttle will cause you to decelerate. The extra load of the engine slowing you down causes your center of gravity to move forward. This is bad when you start to lose traction (as would happen in this case), and is more likely to have your back end try to pass your front end.... On a manual you can use the clutch to disengage the motor and allow your natural momentum to carry you through without changing your center of gravity.
So true, this is a good conversation. The DCT does apply some engine breaking when you release the throttle. Not as much as a manual, but enough to cause drag on the rear wheel and maybe break it loose if on a slippery surface. Ken had the right answer I think - try to keep enough throttle on so it doesn't downshift and cause drag at the rear wheel. I think I'll do some parking lot practice when I get a chance, to see how easy this throttle control really is. This could get very tricky to do.
I know when I first tackled some twisty roads in drive mode, it was unnerving when the downshift or upshift came during the turn and changed your line. Worked better in S mode, but still a learning process.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Jedi, I don't know if you have ever been in the position with a car or truck and run onto black ice. You lose all traction and any engine reduction that transfers to the drive tires will cause them to slightly slide. The tires that are sliding will go with the slant of the road, thus you will get into an uncontrolled slide. In that case it is better to push in the clutch or slide an automatic into neutral and let the vehicle free wheel with you just keeping the vehicle going in a straight line. The vehicle will slow on it's own until you are down to a safe speed. This is all on the presumtion that there is nothing in your path. If there is, the only option you have is to steer slightly toward the safest spot, possibly even to the ditch rather than a collision with another vehicle. There is no good choice in this situation. Driving semi's for my whole life it has saved my but many times.Usually there is a hole to head for. In most cases when you hit the gravel shoulder you start to have a bit more traction. I have used this policy many times. Your brakes are your enemy in some situations. I have been in situation many times but have had the luck to not have had an accident or put myself in the ditch in millions of miles of travel. Many times it was one of those ( THANKS BIG GUY FOR GETTING ME THROUGH ).
 

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I live in Dallas, we mostly get black ice instead of snow accumulation. I thought the advice in a car was to let off the gas and don’t brake, so you’re letting the wheels just roll. I guess a car has a smoother transmission such that it’s not lugging down to downshift (in an automatic)? Or, most cars have a normal ‘creep’ to them where you kinda creep forward at a traffic light - would that provide a little acceleration so that the car doesn’t lug down like our CTX?

I try to completely stay off the roads if there’s snow/ice, generally.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you are in slower traffic like urban speeds that is fine. What I was describing was highway speeds or going down hills. It is a safer way to get your speed down without any braking or transmission pullback affecting the vehicles tragectory. You want to keep it straight until you again have control. Tires have very little friction on ice at speed. Any resistance can easly force a change in direction.
 

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I live in Dallas, we mostly get black ice instead of snow accumulation. I thought the advice in a car was to let off the gas and don’t brake, so you’re letting the wheels just roll. I guess a car has a smoother transmission such that it’s not lugging down to downshift (in an automatic)? Or, most cars have a normal ‘creep’ to them where you kinda creep forward at a traffic light - would that provide a little acceleration so that the car doesn’t lug down like our CTX?

I try to completely stay off the roads if there’s snow/ice, generally.
A vehicle with 4 wheels does not allow you to lose your balance and have your back end sling past your front end as quickly as a motorcycle can....
 
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