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I've read several posts here answering calls for advice on this and that. One was along the lines of "I'm new to this, should I get the auto or manual?"

First and foremost, this activity is as much about individuality and freedom as anything - there is no one right way.

Secondly, if you choose to shift a 6-speed dual clutch manual transmission with paddle shifters (as all Ferraris do now), you are no lesser a man. If you enjoy messing with a shift lever, a clutch lever, rev matching, traffic, and keeping yourself alive all at the same time, go for it. With 500k miles on my odometer, I choose not to and see no advantage for a beginner to learn an obsolete technology. There has never been a moment on my CTX700 DCT when I thought "gee, I could really use a fully manual tranny about now."

If that's not enough to clear the chest thumping about what is manhood, need I point out we are all piloting a powerfully awesome compromise of a bike any standard issue woman could handle with ease?
 

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Did I miss something? Who's chest pumping?

We choose this bike for my wife who was having problems learning manual shifting (even though she does just fine in a MT Auto) and I feel much better now that she can concentrate on the road and other important things.

That being said she will have less to choose from in the future if she ever wants to step up because of her lack of fully learning MT's.

I just choose to ride MT's because I enjoy it and it is 2nd nature to me anyway.
I still get a kick out of riding her CTX though and can see the appeal for some folks so no chest pumping here...:D
 

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I learned to ride last year at the ripe age of 49, and bought a Yahama Majesty scooter for the very reasons you mentioned. I took the MSF class locally and struggled with trying to remember all the safety stuff PLUS worrying about what gear I should be in at what time. The Majesty allowed me to enjoy riding and focus on safety while learning and improving riding skills and habits.
I purchased my CTX 700DCT about 4 weeks ago and love every minute of it. I usually ride in D, don't care for S and have played with manual but always go back to D. This bike was built with ME in mind...there are too many other people out there not paying attention while driving that I need to watch for - without the distraction of "what gear am I or should I be in" to worry about.

I'm guessing that if i learned to ride as a youngster, shifting would be second nature to me but since that didn't happen...I just want to say THANK YOU Honda for allowing me to ride safely and comfortably regardless of what others say about my DCT!

Dalene
 
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I learned to ride last year at the ripe age of 49, and bought a Yahama Majesty scooter for the very reasons you mentioned. I took the MSF class locally and struggled with trying to remember all the safety stuff PLUS worrying about what gear I should be in at what time. The Majesty allowed me to enjoy riding and focus on safety while learning and improving riding skills and habits.
I purchased my CTX 700DCT about 4 weeks ago and love every minute of it. I usually ride in D, don't care for S and have played with manual but always go back to D. This bike was built with ME in mind...there are too many other people out there not paying attention while driving that I need to watch for - without the distraction of "what gear am I or should I be in" to worry about.

I'm guessing that if i learned to ride as a youngster, shifting would be second nature to me but since that didn't happen...I just want to say THANK YOU Honda for allowing me to ride safely and comfortably regardless of what others say about my DCT!

Dalene
Exactly, my wife was the same age when she took the MSF course...
 

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manhood credentials: i ride a vtx 1800 and a shadow.

the ctx dct will be for my lady when the time comes. that said, i'm sure i'll dig the heck out of the ctx. what a great development for riders now and yet to be!
 

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I've read several posts here answering calls for advice on this and that. One was along the lines of "I'm new to this, should I get the auto or manual?"

First and foremost, this activity is as much about individuality and freedom as anything - there is no one right way.

Secondly, if you choose to shift a 6-speed dual clutch manual transmission with paddle shifters (as all Ferraris do now), you are no lesser a man. If you enjoy messing with a shift lever, a clutch lever, rev matching, traffic, and keeping yourself alive all at the same time, go for it. With 500k miles on my odometer, I choose not to and see no advantage for a beginner to learn an obsolete technology. There has never been a moment on my CTX700 DCT when I thought "gee, I could really use a fully manual tranny about now."

If that's not enough to clear the chest thumping about what is manhood, need I point out we are all piloting a powerfully awesome compromise of a bike any standard issue woman could handle with ease?
Most names people use on here are gender neutral. I just assumed all of those with a DCT were females. :D
 

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I think the DCT is a great option for those transitioning as well as those with any medical need. I rode dirt bikes as a kid and just enjoy the clutch. We purchased the CTX for my wife and I think a lot about the DCT because of the ABS. If I had the extra 1,000 I would have bought the DCT just for ABS. My main concern was resale ability with the DCT.
 

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I would tend to agree at first but even Honda feels the DCT will sell high initially then settle out twd the manual. I plan on keeping it at least 3 years at this point. The phrase FJR AE comes to mind.
 

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If that's not enough to clear the chest thumping about what is manhood, need I point out we are all piloting a powerfully awesome compromise of a bike any standard issue woman could handle with ease?

I must have missed the chest thumping manhood post. Darn it.

This forum has been pretty good and direct with posts and every now and then people speak their mind. Being able to defend against untrue statements is great because the "Truth will set you free".

We are all so lucky to have freedom of choice and manufacturers who are trying to get us to choose them.

PS: my 2 son's can't drive a stick. when I croak, they will have to sell my Cobra without ever driving it. Their loss not to know how for the learning of it. But I still consider them Men.
 

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I say buy and ride what you want for what ever reason(s) you want and don't worry about what the rest of the world may or may not think about what we own, ride, or do. Most of this image thing is our own minds' creation anyway and others probably don't really think or care that much about this so called image we're trying to express about ourselves by what we own or do. Most of them are too busy worrying about what we think of them to be worrying about what they think of us for making the choices we make.

Even though I had never previously ridden a motorcycle of any sort (I come from a scooter background only), I opted for the standard transmission for four reasons; none of which have to do with feeling or being more manly for making this decision. My four reasons have solely to do with what makes practical sense for me, even though I certainly understand the reasons why one would choose a DCT in many circumstances.

1. Saves $1,000 or so off MSRP. Maybe even more, as the dealer sold me the standard trim @ $600 off the list price without any hassling or hesitation and no dealer fees to make up for it. This is the main reason I opted for the standard. A $1,000 premium for an automatic transmission is pretty standard in the auto world, but the average car is over $25K, whereas this bike starts @ $7K. As a percentage of the total price, $1K is a big chunk extra to pay for this bike.

2. Saves 22 lbs off the curb weight.

3. According to Honda and Fuelly reporters, the standard improves average mpg a noticeable amount. After two tank fulls, I've not gone under 77 mpg yet. I am a light weight, I use pure gas, and my daily commute is conducive towards high mpg, but still, I don't think I'd be much above 70 with the same bike in the "D" trim.

4. My normal commute route, which will be over 90% of the miles I'll ride, is very rural and mostly highway, which means the hassle of clutch and shifting will be minimal for my circumstance.

Having stated all this and also being an owner of a straight shift car, I must say that there are definitely some things I find beneficial about straight shifts in general (the biggest being that I decide when and where to be in the gear I want to be in and when to change it), but I operating a clutch is not one of them. If an OEM ever came out with a straight shift with an automatic clutch, then that would be the tranny I'd choose. Yeah--I know--that's what a DCT allows for, but one pays dearly for the options of manual, sport, and/or drive; whereas a more simplified straight shift with automatic clutching that would occur by manually choosing another gear and the clutch would do its thing by wire, this would be just the thing for me. No weight or mpg penalty; not as much of a price penalty; but it would take away the hassle of manual clutching.
 

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I have always driven manual transmissions by feel and sound. I mostly use S mode but still override with the paddles because I see the road ahead (load) and the automatic tran does not.
 

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Bill you have a Cobra? Will you adopt me so it can stay in the family when you "croak"
with your name I figured you did too.

mine in 2004 Mustang with supercharged 4.6 with 6 speed and IRS rear end. I am up to 27k since new. I have enough kids driving me crazy with thei drama . lol.
 

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Bill I have over a hundred Cobras. Problem is the biggest one is 10" long. I have worked on a few and hope to own a replica one day. The handle comes from my early Ebay days when my diecast collection was huge and I bought and sold them regularly.
 

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Bill I have over a hundred Cobras. Problem is the biggest one is 10" long. I have worked on a few and hope to own a replica one day. The handle comes from my early Ebay days when my diecast collection was huge and I bought and sold them regularly.
funny and sounds cool. Are You hanging on to the last 100 for a reason? Diecast are quite nice to display around the garage.

My story is I wanted to build a replica but realize I had neither time or space to do it so decided to get a V8 Mustang with a stick. Stopped by a dealer and looked at some used ones and the salesman asked if I would consider a Mustang Cobra now 10,000 off . I said "what's a cobra"?, He opened the hood and I said "that's a freaking blower", tell me more...

30 years earlier I drove a 68 fastback mustang of my dad's with a 427 Tunnel port engine to 132mph and 11.3 et in a quarter mile drag race. Sure wish I had that car now.


I don't drive it much but on long trips like to Vegas (hit 128 in 4th last trip), Crater Lake, Coast line, Bay area and such when I take vacation. It is a much more friendly and modern road car than a cobra replica but I still love them too.
 

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I have actually found this site very refreshing for the lack of "chest thumping." I haven't seen anyone belittle the automatic (or the manual).

I am also a member of a Camaro forum (I have a highly-modified SS set up for drag racing) and the manual vs automatic fighting is horrible there. Ugh.

I agree with you folks... get the bike you like to ride the best.

This is a very civilized community of CTX riders. Thank you for that.
 
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