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Honda seems to want to hit a cross section of customers that are new to bikes who are uncertain if they want a cruiser or a sports bike. The design seems to hit a middle path IMO.

But what do you guys think the CTX700 leans more towards? Is it more of a sports bike or a cruiser?
 

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I think if it came with the hard luggage, I think they could get away with calling it sport touring model, but without it, and having those forward foot pegs, I think they'll have a hard time convincing anyone it's a "sport" anything.
 

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I think if it came with the hard luggage, I think they could get away with calling it sport touring model, but without it, and having those forward foot pegs, I think they'll have a hard time convincing anyone it's a "sport" anything.
Exactly, the riding position on the CTX700 is way to comfortable to be considered a sport. I like how it could have hard luggage attachments it make the CTX700 look even better in my opinion.
 

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Seating position, reach and foot position play the biggest part of placing a bike in a certain category, be it sport, cruiser or touring. That being said, the foot position leans toward cruiser, upright riding position goes in the direction of touring and all that plastic is kind of sporty. It will not have the handling of a sport bike because of the bike design and your leg/foot position will affect your control of the bike with aggressive riding.

I do believe though it will be a very popular bike with anyone who wants a cost effective and fun way to hit the road, for work or fun. It will be a bike of many titles by time everyone does their own customization magic and start posting riding tales.

Gonna be a fun 2013-2014 ride season as things get cranked up. WoooHooo
 

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the interesting thing about the CTX is that it's a cruiser riding position on modern naked bike geometry, wheels and tyres. There's no sport bike in there, more cruiser /all rounder. It's torquey, fuel efficient ... and different, I can't think of any other bike like this.
 

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Most definitely a cruiser. But I do see the sport bike influences in there style wise. It's the cruiser design that really appeals to me. Comfortable for commutes and long distance driving.
 

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Seating position, reach and foot position play the biggest part of placing a bike in a certain category, be it sport, cruiser or touring. That being said, the foot position leans toward cruiser...
With the lean angle being hampered by the foot pegs...like a cruiser...I'd vote for it being a cruiser. :)

Chris
 

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the interesting thing about the CTX is that it's a cruiser riding position on modern naked bike geometry, wheels and tyres. There's no sport bike in there, more cruiser /all rounder. It's torquey, fuel efficient ... and different, I can't think of any other bike like this.
I have trouble conceptually understanding what Honda has here in the CTX700 and 700N; maybe someone who is more familiar with different styles and how motorcycles are normally engineered can help me.

I know from reading that Honda has created a space-saving situation with this power train set up compared to any bike ever built, because the cylinders are canted so far forward. This, as I understand it, makes the center of gravity lower than similarly-styled bikes for better handling especially at slower speeds, and also, gives more space vertically to allow other options not ever seen from an engineering standpoint.

So with the NC700 series, the space savings is easily seen. They've been able to keep an acceptable fuel capacity and add enough built-in storage in front of the rider to store a full-face helmet.

What I don't understand is what is going one with the CTX700 and 700N. The fuel capacity is slightly less than the NC700 and far less than most cruisers, and the storage is pretty minimal. So where does the space savings show itself? How does this bike differ from other cruisers with similar seat heights?

I've been looking at cruisers to try and figure this out myself but am still at a loss. What I've seen is that some of them with big twins on them have the engine come way up vertically between the riders legs; most of them have the wheel going more forward and the forks at a more horizontal angle; and some of them have a larger wheel in the front. But I've also seen that some of them don't seem to have any of that, and looking at the specs, some don't have a longer wheel base, yet they have a similar seat height. So if this is the case (and I'm not saying it is, because I'm motorcycle dumb and don't really understand) where is the space taken up that was gained in the CTX700 series?
 

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The space savings was taken up by lowering the seat.

Chris
Yeah I get that they lost the space compared to the NC700X, because the seat has been lowered, but many cruisers have low seats as well, and sometimes they have wheel bases as short as the CTX, so, if the canted cylinders have saved some room as compared to other cruisers, where in the geometry is the CTX smaller than these cruisers.

Does the engine and gas tank rise up higher on these than the CTX? Is that it?
 

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Yep the gas tank in a cruiser takes up all the space where the CTX's tank is. The cubby is cutting in to the volume. Also in the NC700 the gas tank is under the seat and you have to raise it to fill the tank where as with the CTX the fill is in front of the seat closer to the usual location. By moving the tank they could lower the seat but lost the storage space. The NC700 used the regular space for a tank as a storage area.
 
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I spent a little time looking at pictures of cruisers, and I see a big difference now in the lay out. I looked at the HD Super Low, Honda Shadow, and the Kawasaki Vulcan 900. They all have the cylinders very close to the rider, just in front of the seat, and they come way up high; maybe to one's waist line nearly. The gas tank, starting from the rear, starts out thin to make room for the engine cylinders and then thickens and angles vertically upward.

The CTX is totally different even though the overall dimensions are pretty close. The cylinder heads are very far forward of the rider; probably 18" or more away. Vertically, the cylinders and all the engine components are much lower and take up the space horizontally instead of vertically. The cylinders probably come up to just above ankle level. The only thing I'm still confused about is why they ended up with such little tank capacity, even though the gas tank seems to sit nearly at the same level and has the same shape as cruisers that I've looked at. It looks at though there is extra space between the gas tank and the frame and then again more space between the frame and the power train. Maybe this was to keep as few changes as possible from the NC design so as to keep costs down; maybe to not stray too far away from a classic motorcycle design; maybe for heat dissapation; or maybe for service reasons. But it seems like the cruisers have all this stuff crammed together. The Honda Shadow, for instance, doesn't seem to have one spot that one could look all the way through the engine area and see the other side.
 

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If they had eleminated the cubby the space could have been for fuel. The Shadow Aero has NO onboard built in storage. It's seat is even lower than the CTX. The tank is wider on most crusiers. They simply have more volume. They couldn't drop more of a tank down as the frame runs through there. The CTX's cubby does have a good function as a great location for an accessory outlet. Whis is something that all modern bikes should have. Not just for phones and gadgets but for a portable air compressor, light or other tools. I don't mind trading some fuel space for the convienence of the outlet. Other people might not want that trade. To each his own.
 

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The CTX's cubby does have a good function as a great location for an accessory outlet. Whis is something that all modern bikes should have. Not just for phones and gadgets but for a portable air compressor, light or other tools. I don't mind trading some fuel space for the convienence of the outlet. Other people might not want that trade. To each his own.
I haven't looked at the specs on the official Honda accessory outlet, but I wonder if it will work for an air compressor? My Yamaha FJR1300 has an accessory outlet in a little glovebox, but it's only rated for a few amps and most air compressors need a 10 amp supply.

It would be easy enough for a handy person to upgrade the wiring (and fuse) to support 10 amp current draw, but then it's not factory anymore. I personally don't care about whether it's factory or not; only if it's done corrrectly.
 

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If you look at the "Genuine Accessory User's Guide" for the CTX700N/NA/ND, it says this about the accessory socket:
- Use only a 1A fuse when replacing the fuse in the accessory harness. Do no use any other fuse for replacement.
- The maximum power rating of connected accessories cannot exceed 12W (12V, 1A)
- Use accessories with the engine running to avoid discharging the battery.
- Switching the headlight to low beam when accessories are connected will help avoid discharging the battery.
- Do not use a cigarette lighter, as this can cause a malfunction.
- Cover the socket with the cap when the accessory socket is not used to prevent entry of foreign objects.
- Carefully secure any connected devices, as vibrations may cause them to shift unexpectedly.

So, dang!, it looks like they don't want you plugging anything with more draw than your cell phone into it. One measley amp is nothing.
 

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It would be worth doing a bit of research on this. Sometimes the info posted in factory guides is generic and hasn't been updated for that particular bike...or for years. :rolleyes:

If it is accurate, then my next question would be to find out how much capacity the charging system has. That quote makes it sound marginal. I have a hard time believing it is, since the NC700X has axillary lights you can buy for accessories.

If the charging system has the capacity, then it is fairly simple to wire in a power outlet to the battery. If you're worried about draining the battery, then put a relay in the circuit to cut out the power when the ignition is off.

Many riders use a Fuzeblock if they plan to add several electrical farkles. It provides one source for power with one side switched on all the time, and the other side on only when the ignition is on.

Also, I've stumbled upon something called a Powerlet. You might want to look into it. It gives you a weatherproof power socket. I'm using one now for my GPS on the NT. You'll need their proprietary cable to connect from the Powerlet to the GPS, but the connection is secure and weatherproof. When you're done, a cap snaps tight onto the opening.

Chris
 

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I put an accessory outlet on my scooter. Just got parts from NAPA fairly cheap and spent the evening wiring directly to the battery. I do have a fuse in between. You would need to check what amps are needed to run a small compressor but redoing a wiring harness with upgraded bits could be done. Just run the engine when doing a bigger draw of power.
 

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I was always interested in putting in an accessory outlet with a switch but I would be too worried some one might start using it when I have my bike parked. In the past my bike has been vandalized so I just kept it out of harms way and put a cover over it. Is there any way to stop the outlet from giving out power when the bike is off?
 

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Either put a switch in line or somehow tied to ignition. Mine on my scooter is just straight to battery with a fuse in between. I only plug something in when I'm gonna be riding. I have had no problems starting the bike with my phone already plugged in or even left plugged in while I had lunch. Phones & small gadgets are not gonna drain the battery unless the battery is almost dead and/or the alternator is shot. At least I think the scoot has an alternator.
 
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