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hello guys and girls, recently bought my wife a ctx700, she enjoys it I just get to work on it :p,was checking the owners manual and noticed the engine and radiator are aluminum, witch is the same as my check impala, in the chevy it requires prestone dexcool antifreeze/coolant as its formulated for that aluminum rad/engine , I currently have 2-3 bottles of it in my garage, can I just flushout/drain the dealer coolant witch im guessing is a cheap brand, and run the dexcool in the bike ?
so doing a bit of reading , and there might be a pressureized tool for the radiator, I don't believe there is but can any one coment on this? with these modern engines one can never be to sure :p
I should easily be able to drain coolant , open the cap off radiator , close system / fill , leave radiator cap off and "burp" the system close cap and fill the reserve,
 

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Aluminum radiators require coolant that is compatible with and non-corrosive to aluminum.
I can't see a reason to change the coolant in your CTX unless you have 24000 mi. or more. If you do change it, remember no silicates, and use ethylene glycol based in a 50/50 mix
The factory, not dealer, installs the coolant and it is likely as good a quality as what you propose to change to.

I see this is your first post.
Welcome aboard!
 

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To do a proper flush, you will need to remove the thermostat as it is a blocker in the system just like any other modern cooling system. Typicaly on a bike there are 3 points of intrest or more. A plug near the bottom of the bike, an opening on the top of the bike and bypassing the thermostat. Two others would also include upper and lower opening points on the radiator. All bikes are different, the locations and configurations can change. Off the top of my head, I do not know where any of these locations are, I never looked and have no need to yet. You will need to flush both sides of the thermostat and burp it. Fill by start closing and filling working upward. Burping usually isn't required on bikes since they have a small whole in the thermostat which does it for you. Just keep an eye on the resevor and top off after some miles. You shouldn't need to flush it out for a very long time mind you~
 

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The coolant that comes from the factory in your CTX is probably better for your CTX than the Prestone you have on your shelf.
In fact, if you ever do replace your factory coolant due to age or mileage, I would rather use the original Honda stuff than the Prestone Dexcool.
 

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Welcome to the forum Redsilver2121.


Leave the factory coolant in there. Its of high quality and should not need to be changed until required by the service schedule. You owners manual lists the proper antifreeze recommended for you bike.
 

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Just an update about coolant for motorcycles. The radiator is just a small part of aluminum to the system, the engine and other components are also aluminum. For your local stores, I have only found two products that qualify to work. One, was Peak, BUT, it was an old bottle, the only one they had left, It was the only one I saw anywhere, the newer version does not qualify! The other was an O'Reilly's brand universal 50/50. What your looking for is a coolant with Ethylene Glycol which most are, but the biggest thing is, it has to be Silicate & Phosphate Free, which most are not. It should say it clearly if it is, if not it is in the mixture. The reason for the requirement is cause motorcycle engines are made of aluminum along with the radiator(most radiators are aluminum anyway) and the common coolants are only ideal for standard iron block engines. Aluminum radiators on iron blocks are common to clog and is cause of the mixture. It is hard to create something that works well on most metals. The common mixture corrodes aluminum, not fast, but it does. The other option is to buy the factory stuff at a higher price.

PS, don't ever buy a coolant just cause it says cool or cold, it is just a marketing technique. The coolest fluid is 100% water, but as we all know water freezes and corrodes some metals. Thus the invention of coolant, best product all around.
 

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The coolest fluid is 100% water, but as we all know water freezes and corrodes some metals. Thus the invention of coolant, best product all around.
Water indeed the most efficient coolant of them all. Having said that, I was wondering, let say you live in deep south and never have freezing weather, what if you use distillate pure water in system and as you know, distillate water do not leave any residue on surface... Does it make any sense?
 

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Honda auto's for many years now have always had the silicone free requirement for antifreeze due to the aluminum engine components. Not a big surprise that the cycles would be the same.

Jack
 

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Water indeed the most efficient coolant of them all. Having said that, I was wondering, let say you live in deep south and never have freezing weather, what if you use distillate pure water in system and as you know, distillate water do not leave any residue on surface... Does it make any sense?
You still run into corrosion, build up and other issues. Mixing metals, rubber, paper etc. water, reacts differently to each material and becomes harmfull in the system alone. Antifreeze does more than prevent freezing. In fact it doesn't prevent freezing, but allows it to still be used at even lower temperatures than where water alone could be used. Antifreeze has inhibitors to reduce and slow freezing and to reduce corrosion and buid up.

A common thing you can do is change the mixture. So say instead of 50/50, you can use 25 coolant and 75 water, this will allow better cooling while still protecting the sytem.
 

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Each locale/s water supply also has an effect and due to the hardness of our water in my area, I always use the premixed since I believe that the antifreeze producers do a mix with water that has minimal mineral content.

Jack
 

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Water indeed the most efficient coolant of them all. Having said that, I was wondering, let say you live in deep south and never have freezing weather, what if you use distillate pure water in system and as you know, distillate water do not leave any residue on surface... Does it make any sense?
Don't forget that coolant just doesn't prevent freezing. It also raises the boiling point of water up to around 270 degrees F.
 

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Actually, water is not the most efficient coolant for internal combustion engines. It may make the lowest temps but it is not the best for engines.
If/when water boils in the engine it causes voids in the system (steam pockets) which results in hot spots and greatly reduced cooling capabilities. It also causes galvanic corrosion.
A 50/50 mix of ethylene glycol reduces those risks as well as raises the boiling temp of the coolant above 212 degrees.
There are new products (some used in bike and car racing) such as "Water Wetter" and "Purple Ice" that help with high heat output situations.
So the best for us is what rebel mentioned earlier.
 
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Honda auto's for many years now have always had the silicone free requirement for antifreeze due to the aluminum engine components. Not a big surprise that the cycles would be the same.

Jack
if i am correct it is ''silicate free'' and most of the antifreeze that is available today is silicate free
 

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There is a drain plug on the underside of the block behind-ish the oil filter, take that out and the lower radiator hose. Should drain almost all of it.

I would just use the Honda coolant (I spent $16 total as it only needs two quarts)... It's been designed for these machines... Sometimes saving a penny can cost you a dollar... If you know what I mean.

The coolant also lubricates parts such as the water pump...

For the people saying wait until 24,000 miles, the manual says change every three years... I just did mine at 3,500 miles on a 2014, wait too long and it starts to become acidic. Mine actually corroded the radiator where the hoses attach.

A common thing you can do is change the mixture. So say instead of 50/50, you can use 25 coolant and 75 water, this will allow better cooling while still protecting the sytem.
You could dilute, yes, but you will be diluting the lubrication properties of the coolant mixture as well. The Honda HP Coolant is just pour it in and call it a day. Call it premixed or whatever but someone spent a H*** of a lot of money to design it to work in these machines...
 

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You could dilute, yes, but you will be diluting the lubrication properties of the coolant mixture as well. The Honda HP Coolant is just pour it in and call it a day. Call it premixed or whatever but someone spent a H*** of a lot of money to design it to work in these machines...
Lubricating properties, No. Corrosion resistance properties, maybe...

My original point was, for the deep south or any other extreme heat climates, increasing the water ratio will cool better. Even though it is a mostly closed system, it can still evaporate, thus also further reducing the water ratio and reducing cooling properties further. And the big thing is, water has better temperature changing properites. Coolant mixes increase thermal insulation compared to water alone.

The purpose of the anti-freeze coolant is to cool the engine, prevent freezing itself and resisting corrosion. Because of the latter two, water cannot be used alone on most systems and climates.
 

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Virtually all Japanese manufactured water pumps require a silicate free anti-freeze to avoid destroying the seals. Most coolant systems call for a 50/50 pre mix because this is the best, simplest compromise to insure long life of the cooling system and in cars, the heating system as well. Its true that some of the major brands like Prestone have removed silicates from their products to better work in Japanese vehicles. I prefer to use the Honda branded antifreeze in my Honda bikes since there's no question concerning compatibility and its price competitive with the other major brands.
 

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Lubricating properties, No. Corrosion resistance properties, maybe...

My original point was, for the deep south or any other extreme heat climates, increasing the water ratio will cool better. Even though it is a mostly closed system, it can still evaporate, thus also further reducing the water ratio and reducing cooling properties further. And the big thing is, water has better temperature changing properites. Coolant mixes increase thermal insulation compared to water alone.

The purpose of the anti-freeze coolant is to cool the engine, prevent freezing itself and resisting corrosion. Because of the latter two, water cannot be used alone on most systems and climates.
"Question: I read your recent column suggesting that the use of coolant stop leak provides the benefit of water pump lubrication. Modern automotive water pumps do not require any type of lubrication. In fact, if the coolant comes in contact with the bearing, the pump has failed. Today's pumps have a sealed, lubricated spindle bearing. This type of bearing has an outer housing, a seal and a lubricated bearing at each end of the housing and a shaft which extends out of each end of the housing. One end carries the impellers for the pumping action and the other end the pulley for the belt that supplies the power.

Water pumps generally fail because of seal failure due to old age, from coolant contamination, or from excessive drive belt pressure. Please stop perpetuating the myth of bearing lubrication.

Signed: Twenty-one years in the bearing industry and a lifelong motor head.

Answer: Your point is well-taken, yet marketers of cooling system products continue to claim that they provide water pump and thermostat lubrication. We have heard this and repeated it for so long, it has become gospel in our minds. By the way, you forgot another cause of water pump failure: cavitation. Worn out coolant allows bubbles to form on the cast aluminum housing that create pits, or cavities, when they explode."


Alright, so lube no...

But taken from Hondas blurb...

"HP Coolant
• Exclusive formula developed by Honda R&D.
• Specifically designed for use in aluminum engines.
• Uses high-tech organic corrosion inhibitors instead of more commonly
used silicate corrosion inhibitors.
• Unlike silicates, HP Coolant’s organic corrosion inhibitors won’t
gell and cause radiator plugging.
• The are also more stable for a longer shelf life and don’t act as abrasives
to mechanical water-pump seals which may cause leaky seals."
 

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Coolant is debatable as oil. Each has their own likes and differences. As long as it meets the standards of what is acceptable, it really doesn't matter from there on.

Every manufacture prefers that you buy their products from them, but they tend to be the most expensive and are not necessarily the best. It is far from necessary to buy theirs if you know what is acceptable to be used. This is why there is more than one brand of product and why all those part stores exist.
 

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not sure why there is a hang up on "Japanese" radiators and water pumps.
Most radiators in today's water cooled engines are aluminum with plastic parts as well.
The silicate free coolant was developed for aluminum radiators, not just the Honda ones.
Less than a 50/50 mix of water and coolant may sound intelligent but if it made sense, I believe you would see wide spread use of it.
 
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