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Discussion Starter #8
I was only asking because I've been reading a lot on the proper way to stop a bike. Of course, all the advice is for manual bikes and they say to either use the clutch or put it in neutral when stopped at a light.

I was curious to know if you found it easier to stop by putting it in neutral (sort of like using the clutch). Otherwise, if the engine is still revving high enough, then it would continue to push the bike a bit.

I'm still getting the feel for stopping my CTX700ND (just moved up from a 50cc scooter). I am practicing in parking lots and leaving it in drive or sport mode. I just wondered if anyone had tried using neutral.

Thanks for the replies. I'll just keep on practicing!
 

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I don't shift into neutral with my manual transmission bikes and simply hold in the clutch so I am ready to go. Automatic should not be put into neutral if stopped for a light. Just let the bike idle. It will not die if idle is set correctly according to the owners manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't shift into neutral with my manual transmission bikes and simply hold in the clutch so I am ready to go. Automatic should not be put into neutral if stopped for a light. Just let the bike idle. I will not die if idle is set correctly according to the owners manual.
LOL! I really should take the seat off and find my owner's manual.

I hear there is an awesome toolkit there too! ;)
 

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Great advice. Always have an outlet. At lights I give space in front of me and watch for at least 2 cars to be stopped behind me before I relax rear scanning.
 

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In a car w/automatic it's not a good practice to put it in neutral at a stoplight, because when you drop it in drive again the tranny must re-engage the clutch, which puts a little more wear on it. Dunno if that applies to the DCT, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think I've come to the conclusion that I just need to spend a lot more time in parking lots practicing stop and go. I can't blame it on the transmission. I just need more practice. :)

Thanks for your answers.
 

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Having a short inseam along with an unstable surface is a combination that will lose to physics every day of the week. The only thing that will help is surface appraisal prior to coming to a stop. Try and avoid lanes that have a sharp decline for drainage such as the outside lane, and if not possible use the foot opposite of the decline and lean that way. I always stay in the left lane unless turning right and use my left foot to stop, keeping the right foot on the peg. That allows me to cheat and sit on the left side of the seat and allowing more of my left leg to reach the ground. I stop left of center and avoid having my foot in the oil at the intersection. I also avoid the right lane because that is usually the stop and go or working lane for turning vehicles. Good luck.
 

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i don't even put my shifty bike into neutral at a light/stop unless i anticipate a REALLY long wait! if i need to move in traffic, i need it in gear -- especially if some texting cager ass is rollin' up faster than he ought...

heck, i put my zook in first when parking, always, as a matter of habit, as we have a lot of hills here in seattle. i only use neutral when backing up or to give my clutch hand a break at a really long light/stop. while it wears on the clutch plates a bit, your friction zone (when coupled with your rear brake) is a powerful maneuvering tool for low speed. in fact, i miss having access to both when rolling on the ctx (i have the dct model) in parking lots as i find the very lowest speeds -- 0 - 4 mph -- could use a bit more torque management of the sort only good friction zone play can provide.
 

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also, keep with that parking lot practice! your first thousand miles will test your patience and morale, no doubt, but persevere -- mastery is totally worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
After spending last night practicing in a parking lot for an hour, I am now pretty sure I can get the hang of this bike. I just need to practice, practice, practice. I'll eventually start driving on the local country roads with very few cars on them (I live in a rural area).

I have had a lot of folks say that almost everyone drops a bike especially when they are noobs (but not everyone will admit it). So, I shouldn't feel like it means it's the wrong bike for me.

Thanks for all the encouragement and advice. I'll persevere!
 

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I will admit to having dropped every bike I've owned, except my GL1800 to date. I can't give details, but the CTX didn't 5 miles on it before it was dropped. It didn't hurt anything but but my wifes's pride. Drops are a part of bike ownership.
 

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Yep, every motorcycle I've owned since I was 9 years old has hit the ground. Some harder than others...

A disk lock (same one) has been responsible for the last two. After the second one I threw it in the river.
 
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