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Alternatively, and I'm not suggesting one break in style over another (only following the break-in suggested by Honda personally), my first mpg recording is so high that I'm not even going to report it. I'm going to first check the accuracy of the trip meter, and that I'm filling to the same top-up point from tank to tank. I think it takes a few tank fulls to get a pretty accurate indication of true mpg and I don't want to start bragging yet.

I'm using the same pump and pointing the same direction and trying to fill to the same top-up point, but that part seems hard to do on this bike. I was amazed at the fact that my trip meter indicated 200 miles before I got the flashing bar. I hope the data of recorded on the first tank turns out to be the norm, because it is absolutely amazing if a 670 cc, fully highway-capable, spark-ignition bike is this much of a miser.

Based on the information I have so far, I'm allowing for a 1.5% trip meter error, but I need to borrow a GPS to verify that this calculated error is somewhere close to the actual error.
 

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My first check of mpg was 64.8. That was with 200miles on bike and at hwy speeds.(6+ hours). When engine loosens up a bit and the first oil change. I hope it will go up.

My 350 bullet Enfield got 85mpg but it was so lean. With larger jets, it dropped to 65/70.
Ran much better too.
 

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After 2300 mi on the bike, routinely getting 62-65 mpg riding one-up, Drive mode predominantly. Ran a tank on Sport mode, and got a 10% [or more] drop in mpg -- still don't LOVE Sport mode for daily riding. Went to Payson, AZ on an overnight trip to get out of the desert last weekend; riding two-up, bike routinely delivered 60-63 mpg.
I love this bike.
 

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I'm averaging 75 to 76 mpg on my CTX700N. I'm tempted to run a tank without ethanol, just to see how far up it goes, from there.
 

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I'm averaging 75 to 76 mpg on my CTX700N. I'm tempted to run a tank without ethanol, just to see how far up it goes, from there.
It will go up with pure gas. No doubt about it. I tested this with my scooter, and it went up about what one would expect. About 3%. In my case, it doesn't make sense economically to run pure gas. It cost me about 6% more to get 3% better mpg, but I do it, because I like to maximize mpg, and I'm protesting the renewable fuels standards law, which makes pure gas harder to find and more expensive.
 

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My average loss from ethanol has been 10%, no matter which vehicle I'm looking at. I'm lucky to have access to a source of non-ethanol-laced fuel, within 10 miles of my house. It goes in all of my yard equipment, but for convenience reasons, I've been going with whatever is most convenient for me (read: 10% ethanol blend), when it comes to the cars, truck and motorcycles.
 

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:cool::eek:
My average loss from ethanol has been 10%, no matter which vehicle I'm looking at. I'm lucky to have access to a source of non-ethanol-laced fuel, within 10 miles of my house. It goes in all of my yard equipment, but for convenience reasons, I've been going with whatever is most convenient for me (read: 10% ethanol blend), when it comes to the cars, truck and motorcycles.
I agree! I think it is absolutely essential to use pure gas in small engines if possible, but I've heard that in some states it is virtually impossible to find pure gasoline (Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada). Just another unintended consequence of the 2007 Economic Independence and Security law that passed forcing ever-increasing blending of ethanol in our gasoline stocks. The law was passed in hopes that it would push more drivers in to choosing E85 for those millions of flex-fuel vehicles that are on the road, but by and large, that program has failed, and fuel distributors have no other choice for meeting the renewable fuels standards than to put 10% ethanol in virtually all gas stocks.

I've never experienced anything like a 10% loss on E10. If I were logging that kind of loss, I would do everything I could within reason to always get pure gas in all my spark-ignition engines.

If you get 10% loss for 10% ethanol, then that means, if you extrapolated it out, pure gasoline, in your case, is 100% more fuel economical than pure ethanol. My experience so far is only about 3% mpg loss, which is more in line with what should be happening (energy density of ethanol is approximately 70% of gasoline, so E10 should give us around .3X.1, or 3% loss).

On my scooter, I did a few tanks of switching back and forth, and I'd give it a tank or two of cycling through before measuring the changes each time. In almost every instance of testing this, I lost about 2 mpg and gained 2 mpg going back to pure gas. My usual mpg with pure gas on the scooter, during the summer, with over 95% of my miles ridden on the same commute route; at the same approximate speeds; in similar weather was around 70. With E10, it was approximately 68. But even though I tried to control as many variables as I could, my tests were still very anecdotal with lots of other factors that can't be taken out, i.e. variance in the actual gasoline of different brands.

I've noticed that lately there has been a big marketing push to stop a new element of the Renewable Fuel Standard from taking place. Specifically a new caveat that will allow fuel distributors to make E15 available for certain model engines that can use this higher blend. I was skeptical about these commercials, because they dodn't give all the facts about this new proposed law, chiefly the part about how E15 cannot be sold as the only choice at the pump and how labeling must ensure that consumers know whether their vehicle can take the higher blend. Only the negatives are touted in the commercial; none of the details are given; and it is not mentioned that such a move could take some pressure off distributors in meeting the standards without making virtually all fuel ethanol fortified as it is now. I looked for the fine print, and at the bottom of the ad, it finally comes up at the end, and it is brought to us by the American Petroleum Institute (API). Now I understand why we don't get the whole truth
 

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I have filled my tank three times. The first tank gave me 67 mpg while the second tank gave me 72 mpg. I was using D and ran at highway speeds mostly (60-65). I think this is great.
 

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After 2300 mi on the bike, routinely getting 62-65 mpg riding one-up, Drive mode predominantly. Ran a tank on Sport mode, and got a 10% [or more] drop in mpg -- still don't LOVE Sport mode for daily riding. Went to Payson, AZ on an overnight trip to get out of the desert last weekend; riding two-up, bike routinely delivered 60-63 mpg.
I love this bike.
Haven't bought a CTX yet, thinking about it.
Wondered what you rode before.
Is two up riding a problem?
Guess it depends on previous bikes.
 

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Two up rding

Haven't bought a CTX yet, thinking about it.
Wondered what you rode before.
Is two up riding a problem?
Guess it depends on previous bikes.
Two up is not a problem at all. The CTX has a very low center of gravity, and is easy to maneuver at all speeds, even dead stop.

I rode a Kymco Xciting 500Ri before; two up lots of times. Before that, a Kymco PS-250; with lots of two up riding as well.

Teach your rider to move as you move, and not to make any other motions, especially fidgeting around back there. I also taught my wife how to ride on her own [Kymco People 150], so she has a good sense of balance and traffic awareness. We use simple hand signals for potty breaks, food, gas, etc.

Also, your rider MUST NEVER give hand signals for you; they can turn sideways and echo your own so that drivers are clear about what moves you are making.

Ride Safe; Ride Often.
f
 

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Haven't bought a CTX yet, thinking about it.
Wondered what you rode before.
Is two up riding a problem?
Guess it depends on previous bikes.
I traded in an 01 gold wing, we did 130 miles today, hwy, rolling hills, back Indiana roads today. Speeds. 30-75 mph

I have dct/abs. Just over 1,100 miles. 65 Mpg, 2up. Had to downshift 6 to5th
On the hills. Engine lugs down trying to go up hills till the rpm goes up. Bike likes to get in to 6th at low speeds. Way too soon.

If that helps ya.
 

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If you research what has been posted thus far on this forum, you'll see that there have been several who would state that Honda's 670 cc is not the best choice for a powered two wheeler for lots of two up riding, especially if one is considering touring or long, highway commutes, of if your combined weight is anywhere close to the GVWR limit, or if one or both riders are big or tall. I've not tried it myself, but a little more horsepower and size are probably needed if two up riding will be a regular part of its use.

I'm not stating that the bike can't handle two up or that it won't work at all; only that it may not be what you're looking for if this is going to be a regular part of what you want a bike for.
 

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Thanks for the inputs on 2 up riding.
My wife has her own bike, a Vulcan 900 and has many thousands of miles solo and 2 up.
I just got rid of my Victory, ...I'm over 76 and it was too big.
I think the CTX will be more in the size of the BMW K75 I had, although it had about 70 hp.
I also am not ready for an auto motorcycle. Also not ready for a Can-Am.
Maybe a Mustang convertible if I leave 2 wheelers.
 

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This will be my first post on the CTX Forum. I just picked up my CTX70ND on Sept 1. It is a awesome bike.

My first tank gas mileage was 57.3 MPG. Hoping for better on the next tank. The dealer filled the tank during the purchase, so I don't if it was filled to capacity.

10-13-2013: My Second tank was 62.7 MPG. Now I'm hoping for the 70 + MPG that some are getting.
 

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It would be interesting to see whether the weight of the rider had an influence on mpg along with the other factors.
 

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Thanks for the inputs on 2 up riding.
My wife has her own bike, a Vulcan 900 and has many thousands of miles solo and 2 up.
I just got rid of my Victory, ...I'm over 76 and it was too big.
I think the CTX will be more in the size of the BMW K75 I had, although it had about 70 hp.
I also am not ready for an auto motorcycle. Also not ready for a Can-Am.
Maybe a Mustang convertible if I leave 2 wheelers.
Victory is a pretty big bike. I don't think you would like the Can-An Spider. I rode my son's Spider. You take a corner and no lean so it wants to pitch you off. He had people cut him off on freeways just like what happens to regular bikes too. It is also very wide up front.

I would have to say when that day comes for me, I would go back to a Miata with the push button hard top. I owned a 1995 that had 50k and sold it at 140k and only a 17.00 part broke other than required service on timing belt every 60k. fun car but it only holds 2 people.
 

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Victory is a pretty big bike. I don't think you would like the Can-An Spider. I rode my son's Spider. You take a corner and no lean so it wants to pitch you off. He had people cut him off on freeways just like what happens to regular bikes too. It is also very wide up front.

I would have to say when that day comes for me, I would go back to a Miata with the push button hard top. I owned a 1995 that had 50k and sold it at 140k and only a 17.00 part broke other than required service on timing belt every 60k. fun car but it only holds 2 people.
My wife and I stopped by the Can-Am dealer in Cookeville the other day. She loves the Spyder. I'm of the same opinion as Bill. I'd rather have a two-seater roadster, and the Mazda Miata would probably be my first choice of such a car, but I'm diesel addicted now that I've owned one, and it pains me to see gas-powered two seaters choices only sold here in the U.S. @ or about 26-35 mpg when I can foresee and predict a diesel, sub 2600-lb convertible roadster, 2.2-liter 4 cylinder, Sky-Active D, that could achieve 50 + mpg with decent performance and 240+ lbs of torque from 1800-2500 RPM. After having a diesel, gas cars just seem like a waste of sheet metal to me. I know I'm biased, but I just couldn't drive without the mpg and the low-end torque that I've become accustomed to with a VW TDI. Mazda now makes a great diesel power plant too but not sold in the U.S.

We told the salesperson at Can Am that I had a newly-designed Honda motorcycle, ; 700 cc, and that she likes the looks and the three wheels of these Spyders. He immediately went into his sales pitch that included talking down motorcycles and motorcycle ownership and talking up the Spyder. Bad, bad strategy, because I guess he was assuming that I would consider giving up the new bike and getting the Spyder, but a salesperson should never tell a motorcycle owner that motorcycles are bad and they should get rid of them and get something else, even if it is what they are sellling. Other than that, he was a good salesperson; not high pressure, conversational in tone, but I guess I should have told him that he shouldn't talk down motorcycles to those who have already chosen to own one. His pitch may work for those who are deciding between a Spyder and a motorcycle who have never owned either, but it was a turn off for me.

My former co-worker who is retired was telling me the other day how much he liked the Victory bikes; he is a Harley owner. One of their big bikes. He likes how the Victories look; sort of got their own character and not so much a Harley wantabes, and he really likes the way they look. I went to their website and found that their smallest bike was over 1700 ccs. and over 600 lbs. I've seen one or two in parking lots and agree that they look amazingly good, but they are not for me. I didn't realize that Victory was a company started by Polaris. I likewise didn't realize that Polaris bought out Indian a few years ago. I've noticed that Indians are also only big, heavy bikes as well.

I would have gladly chosen an American-made bike; love the looks and the sound of all three brands(minus the loud pipes), but it would have to be a decently-engineered, mid-range bike with great mpg and 550 lbs or less. I'm all for American muscle, as long as the muscle includes some practicality smart engineering for a daily rider.

The only American-made bike that meets my wants/needs is the HDT 667 cc, single-cylinder, naturally-aspired, mechanically-injected diesel mounted on a KTR bike, and it is not sold to the public.
 
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