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Original battery lasted just over four years so I replaced it with the same battery.
 
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I picked up an Antigravity ATZ10 last year after my stock battery finally died on me after work at 9PM, leaving me to spend the next 2 days after work pushing it almost 2.5 miles because I was too cheap to have it towed. The new lithium battery is definitely a nice upgrade over the stock with modest weight savings (though that doesn't really amount to much in the grand scheme of things), and the built-in starter function offers some piece of mind knowing if the battery does die on me, I will at least have enough power to get it moving until I can fully charge it.

However, here a couple of precautions regarding Li-Ion batteries:

1) You can't just use your existing battery tender/charger with it, as it was designed for lead/acid batteries like the stock battery, and they will damage your new LiIon. You will need to buy an appropriate charger/maintainer, which adds significant expense.

2) LiIon batteries hate cold weather (just ask anyone with a Nissan Leaf!), and I was reminded of that firsthand this week. I was late to work on Sunday because I had parked my bike outside my house as I usually do, having forgotten that we would have near-freezing cold & rain over the weekend that our area hasn't received in a while. When I went to start the bike in the early morning after a nice 3-day weekend, I couldn't get so much as a light to turn on. The cold weather had completely drained my battery over a couple of days, even though I had fully charged it after replacing a dead headlight earlier in the week.

That being said, I was able to put the battery's built-in jumpstart button to the test & get the bike moving again. After work, I still had enough charge to start the bike once more, go home, and get the battery fully charged in the safety of the garage.
 

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Yuasa has a pretty good reputation. Funnily enough, batteries plus' replacement gets really good reviews on forums and their website. I did recently have one Yuasa with a defect...next day replacement for what it's worth.
 

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Yuasa has a pretty good reputation. Funnily enough, batteries plus' replacement gets really good reviews on forums and their website. I did recently have one Yuasa with a defect...next day replacement for what it's worth.
+1 for Yuasa. Be sure to get an AGM, not sure if they make the regular lead/acid or not.
 

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Just like tires, windshields, oil, seats, helmets & the list goes on. Ask 10 people you'll get 10 different answers.....
Having said that, I've had great luck using the YUSA battery. I swapped out one 6yo because of it's age. 6yo one still sitting on the shelf, fully charged.
Dennis Kirk stands behind whatever they sell & their prices are good. Shipper dropped a battery & damaged the corner, send DK a pic, they had a new battery headed my way the same day. Sent me a shipping return label, shipper dropped off my new battery & took the damaged one. None deal.
 

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Unless you live and ride in the freezing cold, there is no sense of not getting a Li, with the prices of brand name standard batteries being almost the same. All 4 of my bikes have Li, I like Shorai, personally.

Having 4 bikes and each one getting about 2500mi a year, it is peace of mind I don’t have to deal with chargers.
 
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The Yuasa lasted me 6 yrs. and started the bike in 10 degree weather. So you know what I replaced it with.
 

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..........................
1) You can't just use your existing battery tender/charger with it, as it was designed for lead/acid batteries like the stock battery, and they will damage your new LiIon. You will need to buy an appropriate charger/maintainer, which adds significant expense.
To clarify, you can't use a battery charger that has a desulfating mode where the battery charger pulses to a high voltage. An old style charger that just supplies a steady 14 or so volts will work fine or even a DC power supply is fine.

2) LiIon batteries hate cold weather, .............................
True. I have an EarthX battery and here is the more complete answer from their web site.

All batteries lose cranking amps in colder temperatures. Every make, model, and year of vehicles has different amounts of cranking amps needed to turn the engine over. You also have to factor in the health and maintenance of the vehicle as well. So the answer is…… it depends. Some vehicles have no issues starting at -25F while some could have issues at -5F. What is unique about a lithium battery is you can warm the internal components by simply trying to start your vehicle. Do not try starting your vehicle for more than 10 seconds per minute as that is not good for your vehicle or battery, but after attempting to start the vehicle, wait one minute, try again. Depending on the amount of warming up needed to get the desired cranking amps, the amount of times needed to do this varies.

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BTW - One of the reasons I bought an EarthX is that it has a voltage limit protection circuit. Once the battery drops to a certain voltage it shuts the battery off to prevent damage. Unlike a lead-acid battery if you leave your headlight on and drain the battery, a lithium battery will be permanently damaged.

Steve
 

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...
2) LiIon batteries hate cold weather (just ask anyone with a Nissan Leaf!), ...
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LiIon hates hot weather too. Ask anyone who left a recharge pack in theirs and the shade moved. I read somewhere the Volt was designed to start the engine to run a fan or air conditioner if the packs got above a certain temperature.
I think this is due to tight packing and low air flow, but why really doesn't matter. When one starts bulging out it will never have the strength it used to have.
 

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Just stick with a regular lead/acid battery. Their cheap and will not give you any grief with a DCT transmission.
 

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LiIon hates hot weather too. Ask anyone who left a recharge pack in theirs and the shade moved. I read somewhere the Volt was designed to start the engine to run a fan or air conditioner if the packs got above a certain temperature.
I think this is due to tight packing and low air flow, but why really doesn't matter. When one starts bulging out it will never have the strength it used to have.
Hm, never had an issue in the heat, and I live in NOLA...
 

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Just stick with a regular lead/acid battery. Their cheap and will not give you any grief with a DCT transmission.
I've had no issues with the DCT since switching to the EarthX battery. I do have a difference in that I no longer have to worry about keeping the bike on a charger and if I haven't ridden in two or three weeks I press the Start button and it fires right up.

Steve
 

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Yuasa Are good batteries, Bought a new one on Amazon for around $85.00 with shipping included in the total price. No issues.
 

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I think you'll be happy with a fresh Yuasa. When you get it, or any battery, check the "mfg. date" stamped on it. If it's over 6 months old, return it. Tell the vendor it's too old & make them pay S&H..........I read that in a "tech" write up in one of my MC mags.
 
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