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Hmm. I charged my battery before a week long trip when I came home I put the charger back on it and it took more than 8 hours to be fully charged.

Weak puny battery or the bike doesn't run at sufficient RPMs to keep it fully charged.

My scooter that runs at higher RPMs holds a charge much better.

Ideas ?
 

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Could just be a bad battery or possibly a fault in the charging circuit. Have the dealer check it. It's under warranty.
 

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Does anyone know how many amps the CTX alternator puts out?
 

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May not apply here, I had a voltage monitor on the wing. From Clearwater lights.

$59 Clearwater voltage sentry.
It was featured in motorcyle consumer news last year. Easy install and helped watch battery charge.
 

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I've been running a heated jacket and gloves on my CTX and I've had no battery issues.

Running out of juice would be a problem because you can't bump-start this bike.
 

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Does anyone know how many amps the CTX alternator puts out?
Battery capacity 11.0 ah
current leakage .2 ma max
fully charged at 68 degrees F13.0 - 13.2
charge below 12.4
normal charge 1.1 a/5-10h
quick charge 5.5 a/1 h

alternator [email protected] 5,000 rpm


service manual page 1-11
 

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how often should the battery need a charge. i have not charged mine yet, however i only have a little over 100 miles on it.

is the charger bike specific?
 

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If you ride every day you won't need to charge the battery.

Charging is only needed when you let the bike sit.

The first battery in my first ST1100 lasted for over ten years and over 140,000 miles without ever being hooked to a charger.

Since my Wee Strom sits a bit in the Winter, I hook a Battery Tender to it. In the summer, I use a Battery Tender on the car.
 

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Bill - Thanks for the info - Jim
 

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Ken, thanks for the information. mine only sits idle two or three days a week when i am traveling for work. i get to ride mostly on the weekends right now.
 

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I don't have a garage, so 3 scoots and the Honda sit outside under covers year round. On the itsy-bitsy batteries for the 2 smaller scooters, We tend the battery if it's going to be cold/icy for more than a week. My wife's battery lasted 2 years, but she rides very short distances. Mine is 2 years old, and only takes a short while to charge up. I think if yours is new there shouldn't be an issue at all. If you have a garage and a tender, even less so. if you don't want it sticking out you can just pop the seat whenever you park.
 

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With this winter being only my second winter as a rider, it has sure been alot different than last year. I am far better equipped to commute in the cold this year. Last year, without any heated gloves, I could comfortably ride down to about 30. Now I can go down to about 15, but this is the third week in a row that I've not had a morning above 15, however, the weekends have been warm (relatively speaking). Therefore, even though I bought the bike to commute primarily, I've been using it as a weekend runner alot this winter just to keep me from having to take some winterizing precautions. I think that last year, if I had the heated gloves, there would have been only a couple of days that would have been too cold for my 35 minute commute. This year is like the "good ole days"[sarcasm].

My CTX is kept in a dedicated, unheated soft shed 10X6. It doesn't share the space with anything but a little tool box and an electric fence power unit. It's protected from the elements but not the cold. It fires up and runs fine though even down to the teens. I make sure I ride it at least once per week. I've got a battery tender, but I've not had to use it. If I go out of town or something happens to me physically, I'll probably take the seat off and hook it up, but otherwise, I'll just go on at least one long ride per week. I get pent up when I don't ride anyway, so it's a win win.
 

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Hi guys, I don't ride during the winter months due to the temperature here in Maryland. Today the temperature is in the low teens. This results in my bike sitting for several months. During this period, I keep the bike on a battery tender and start it every other week. I let it run for 15 minutes. I also keep stable lizer in the gas. It runs well and seems to be doing ok. I will have the oil changed in the spring before I take any serious trips.:)
 

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Hi guys, I don't ride during the winter months due to the temperature here in Maryland. Today the temperature is in the low teens. This results in my bike sitting for several months. During this period, I keep the bike on a battery tender and start it every other week. I let it run for 15 minutes. I also keep stable lizer in the gas. It runs well and seems to be doing ok. I will have the oil changed in the spring before I take any serious trips.:)
I absolutely agree with your battery tender usage and stabilizer for storage, but, although I don't know this for sure from a physics standpoint, I would think that only idling an engine, without operating at higher RPM and/or running it out on the highway would have very little benefit and could have some negative consequences, i.e. carbon buildup, etc.

Do you just let it idle or do you run it at higher RPM during these runs? I've heard revving in neutral can discolor the pipe, so I'm not sure I'd idle mine in that situation. Maybe I'd start it now and then, but I don't know about 15 minutes at normal idle and that being the only operation over a multi-month period.

What do the gear heads on here think about extended idling for maintaining a bike during storage? Good? Bad? or Indifferent?
 

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Probably not a great idea to just run the bike at idle. You stand a greater chance of causing internal condensation (especially in the exhaust) if you don't bring the bike up to full operating temperature. If you can take it out and ride for 20 minutes, that's a different story but short of that you're better off leaving it alone. I'm on Long Island and it's been a pretty cold winter thus far (currently 10 degrees out) but just two weeks ago, I was able to ride my bike to work (reached the low 40's). Right now the bikes are covered in the garage, plugged into battery tenders ... the wife won't get out there unless it's in the 50's and we may not see that until March.
 

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Idling for long periods is not recommended due to excessive carbon buildup. The starter is your main draw off your battery and the alternator does not turn fast enough to charge the battery to make up the difference. A battery tender is the recommended way to keep a battery charged if storing for a long period of time, usually 2 months or more.
 

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I not so sure about the carbon build up being worse than rust. But moisture in the engine and exhaust is always present. It has to be run enought to get hot enough to dry out the system. I have seen many collectable bikes that were run short periods of time where the exhaust was rusting from the inside and the outside looked almost new.
 

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When ever storing any engine for more than 3 months or more, its always best to remove the plugs and spray a fine mist of engine oil into the cylinders to prevent rust. Due to the normal operation of the engine, there will always be cylinders that are dry or partially dry of oil. Boat engine manufactures have been requiring this as part of the winterization process for years. Moisture will accumulate in the exhaust system whether you run the engine or not. Just part of normal wear and tear.
 
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