CTX 700 Forum banner
21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
2014 CTX 700 DCT
Joined
·
89 Posts
My mechanic said these are good, but, you can never tell when the tender goes bad. It will still show a green light...
Your battery tender and voltage indicator are probably still good and do the job they are designed to do - check and maintain voltage. However, your battery may no longer be able to deliver enough current necessary to crank your motorcycle. You could do a load test (current draw test) to determine the health of your battery.

Revzilla has an article "How to test a motorcycle battery" that may help.
 

·
Registered
2014 Honda CTX700ND
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Your battery tender and voltage indicator are probably still good and do the job they are designed to do - check and maintain voltage. However, your battery may no longer be able to deliver enough current necessary to crank your motorcycle. You could do a load test (current draw test) to determine the health of your battery.

Revzilla has an article "How to test a motorcycle battery" that may help.
Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Hi guys..thought I'd give my 2 cents worth. First I'd take battery to get it checked. Sometimes you get a defective battery that dies sooner than it should. 2nd trace battery cables and make sure everything is tight and clean. These two are the most common problems. 3rd could be bad celenoid. 4th if all else fails take it to a mechanic. Hope it's an easy fix. Please let us know what the problem was because it helps others that might get the problem.
Good luck 👍
 

·
Registered
2014 Honda CTX700ND
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Hi guys..thought I'd give my 2 cents worth. First I'd take battery to get it checked. Sometimes you get a defective battery that dies sooner than it should. 2nd trace battery cables and make sure everything is tight and clean. These two are the most common problems. 3rd could be bad celenoid. 4th if all else fails take it to a mechanic. Hope it's an easy fix. Please let us know what the problem was because it helps others that might get the problem.
Good luck 👍
💯 will...I had done the obvious checklist, i.e. corroded or loose battery cables, etc.
Have an appointment on 10/5 with my Honda mechanic to get it fully checked out.
I trust them and they do good work at a fair price. Unfortunately, that is the earliest that they could fit me in...
I just hate to get it towed there and pay that fee. My insurance will cover half of it...they are 30 miles away, but, I wouldn't trust anyone else...I want to make sure that it's just the battery and nothing else. Planning some long foliage trips this fall.
Will keep the community posted.
Thanks to all for your help and insight...
 

·
Registered
2014 CTX 700 DCT
Joined
·
89 Posts
I want to make sure that it's just the battery and nothing else.
An alternative is to remove the battery, take it to an auto parts store, and have it tested for free. My local Advance Auto store's automotive battery load test equipment does also test motorcycle batteries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Another alternative is just to replace the battery. I recently picked up a Parts Unlimited one from a local cycle shop for ~$110, shopping for convenience rather than price. Worst case, your old battery was OK, but it was mature anyhow and you've replenished it; best case is you're back on the road. Isn't this gamble worth it when compared to the $ and headache of transporting your bike to the shop? Batteries go dead!
 

·
Registered
2014 Honda CTX700ND
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Another alternative is just to replace the battery. I recently picked up a Parts Unlimited one from a local cycle shop for ~$110, shopping for convenience rather than price. Worst case, your old battery was OK, but it was mature anyhow and you've replenished it; best case is you're back on the road. Isn't this gamble worth it when compared to the $ and headache of transporting your bike to the shop? Batteries go dead!
I want to get it checked out fully to ensure it's just not a battery issue or are there any other underlying factors that either caused it to go bad or contributed to it. I take long trips and don't want to be stuck somewhere. It's piece of mind. I can change a battery. To each his own.✌
 

·
Registered
2014 CTX 700 DCT
Joined
·
52 Posts
We used to use the same tender. Until 1 spring all 3 of the bikes we were rotating it on had dead batteries. All 3 batteries were boiled dry. End of that tender. Used a Honda optimate ever since, all batteries fine.
Keep an eye on your tenders folks, they aren't fool-proof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
Just because the battery reads 12.5 volts or even 13 volts AFTER it comes off the charger, doesnt mean it has the power (amps) to turn the engine.
That is what a load test does. It test the ability of the battery to put out amps. Enough amps to start the engine.
Right after a charge the volts will look good, even very good. If you wait a few minutes those volts might just drop down to where your thinking something is up.
As a battery ages the ability to supply those big amps to turn a engine decreases. And then when you press the starts button all you get is a click.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
117 Posts
Yes sir, three years on a battery is quite common. However, it is not unusal for a high quality battery to fail in less time. Checking the voltage under load (shile starting) is the way to go. Or, take the bike to an auto parts store (e.g., Autozone, O'Reilly, etc.) and have them test the battery for free. Cheers!
 

·
Registered
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 2018 Kawasaki X300
Joined
·
85 Posts
You can get one of those inexpensive battery load testers at Harbor Freight to test your battery from time to time. With the DCT you can be in a pickle if you are trying to get home from some desolate area and your bike won't start. As someone mentioned earlier, just change the battery every three years, whether or not it works and avoid being stranded.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
You can get one of those inexpensive battery load testers at Harbor Freight to test your battery from time to time. With the DCT you can be in a pickle if you are trying to get home from some desolate area and your bike won't start. As someone mentioned earlier, just change the battery every three years, whether or not it works and avoid being stranded.
Or you can carry an inexpensive Lithium Booster pack for when that time comes. You only need a very small one for a motorbike.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jdbrot
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top