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Discussion Starter #1
I am approaching quickly 1 year of having the CTX as my first bike. I have enjoyed my time with the CTX and spent a bit of money / time to customize it to my liking. When I ride my CTX around town or down the highway, I feel good but there is sometime where I feel that acceleration could be better.

so with that said.. at what point do you decide to stay with your first bike and at what point do you decide to move on?
 

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when you decide that the need for more acceleration outweighs the rest of the needs being met. For me, the acceleration is adequate when compared to the rest of the criteria being met by the bike.
 

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Unfortunately you found the perfect bike right out of the gate so you won't really be able to fully appreciate it. My advice is to sell it and have fun with something more thrilling. If you survive you'll eventually come back to square one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
you both make a REALLY good point. Overall, I am very happy with the CTX. the part that is unknown for me is other types of bikes out there and what experience it might bring.

For example, the idea of getting a sports bike like brad peaks my interest (never ridden one) but the stories that I get from everyone else about their back hurting after 45 minutes doesn't appeal to me. In addition, my other buddy has a sportster who says its more like a bar hopper since riding it for more than an hour pays a toll to the back, but says he couldn't see himself going down in the engine size.

The more I think about it, I think what I am missing is the experience of riding other types of bikes. Part of me says, you never know until you hop around while the other side says that the CTX gives you more range in types of riding that one can do. I think now I understand why a number of people own more than 1.. unfortunately in my case, i am only allowed one.
 

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Keep an eye on the local shops. Several around me have test ride days. Go to them and try them there without making any commitments.
 

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I am approaching quickly 1 year of having the CTX as my first bike. I have enjoyed my time with the CTX and spent a bit of money / time to customize it to my liking. When I ride my CTX around town or down the highway, I feel good but there is sometime where I feel that acceleration could be better.

so with that said.. at what point do you decide to stay with your first bike and at what point do you decide to move on?

If you typed that up, you've reached that point. Just be realistic about what you are losing vs. gaining.


I've lasted about 10 months on the CTX. Good all around bike. Extreme variety for luggage options. 67 mpg :), no passing power. Also, since I bought new old stock, I lost about $500 and fees on trade. Got a used Harley V-ROD, awesome passing power, p$$$ poor fuel economy, ZERO luggage options, but puts a smile on my face every time I ride it.


BMW, Triumph and Harley dealers allow test rides, shop around for Honda/Yamaha/Kawi dealer that also allow test rides or Demo days. Set the budget and make a list of what you want on the bike.
I test rode the BMW F800GT and loved the bike, but hated the riding position. Try it before you buy it.
 

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Only you can answer that question for yourself. As others have pointed out, dealers have demo days or have liberal test ride policies. The fact that you've spent a year riding before the question really coming up says something. Each bike out there has tradeoffs, you just need to decide what you're comfortable with giving up/getting in the exchange.

This is my advice, take it for what it's worth, considering my known and documented lack of experience thus far (dang hands!):

- Do some research on some bikes you're interested in
- Test ride as many of those bikes as you can. With regards to HDs, they have the Eagle Rider program where you can rent bikes if you want to do some more long term and/or long distance testing
- Narrow it down between those you've chosen
- Decide if the tradeoffs are worth going with a new (or new to you) scoot, or sticking with the CTX

Don't forget that you can modify any bike to be more comfortable/to your liking. I agree with your friend that a Sportster isn't designed to be a super long distance bike (lack of a 6th gear chief among them, IMHO), but it doesn't mean it can't be made better. Great Egret on YouTube took a month-long ride on Route 66 on his Iron 883. He made significant changes with the seat/bars/etc. to suit his needs. Every rider will be different.

Most important thing is to be honest with yourself. Do you love the CTX in every way but just wish you had a bit more 'oomph'? If so, maybe the CTX1300 is a better choice than jumping ship completely just for more CCs. Unless you're planning on taking more/longer trips in the future, it might not be worth spending the extra money just to get better acceleration.

Best part is, you already have a sweet scoot. Take your time and chew over this for a bit. Other bikes will always be there.

For what it's worth, one of the bikes I was heavily considering is the Kawasaki Vulcan S. Same engine as in the Ninja 650, but in cruiser form. ABS. Seat/handlebars/pegs are adjustable (3 settings for each, IIRC).

I'll have my Iron back in 6 days from the shop and plan on taking some trips around upstate NY. I'll report back how it goes as far as comfort, etc. :)
 

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howdy, my Dad , may he rest in peace, would say better not to jump out of the frying pan into the fire. you obviously can live with what you have and can use more experience before getting on a wreck waiting to happen after the squeals of delight. i'd reccomend waiting a bit in case i wasn't clear.
ken
 

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I am approaching quickly 1 year of having the CTX as my first bike. I have enjoyed my time with the CTX and spent a bit of money / time to customize it to my liking. When I ride my CTX around town or down the highway, I feel good but there is sometime where I feel that acceleration could be better.

so with that said.. at what point do you decide to stay with your first bike and at what point do you decide to move on?
When it doesn't meet your expectations, or needs. And then, be prepared to do it again with your next purchase. In 58 years of riding I've owned Several Harley's, a few Honda's, Bultaco' s, Can-Am's, and Kawasaki's, one Yamaha, one Suzuki, a Vespa, and a Norton. Soon after I switch from a dirt bike to a street bike, I start thinking about how much more fun the dirt bike was, and vice-versa. Oh, man! That grass is really greener on the other side...
 

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The more I think about it, I think what I am missing is the experience of riding other types of bikes. Part of me says, you never know until you hop around while the other side says that the CTX gives you more range in types of riding that one can do. I think now I understand why a number of people own more than 1.. unfortunately in my case, i am only allowed one.
Join Eaglerider and rent a few bikes.
 

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The point is when you consider it, you are already past that point. Now comes research and reasoning. All of it is on you, financial, purpose etc.

There are a ton of different bikes to choose from. You don't even have to change class if you don't want to, just get a more powerful cruiser if that is what you like. Or change class, the variations are great and tweaking ability to please is even greater. When you say more power, that doesn't necessarily mean get a RR, that is a common misconception. There are different power classes in each type class.

I suggest first start with type. Sit on a cruiser, standard, adventure, sport tour, sport, RR etc. and see what fits you best for your comfort and maneuverability. Forget what they all have or don't have, you need to figure this comfort and maneuverability out first. Once you figure that out, the rest is easily narrowed. If you skip this step, you will most likely be changing again.

Without a sense of urgency, desire loses its value. -- Jim Rohn
 

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Well I am moving UP from a Vespa 300 (although Im keeping it to tour with my hubby's matching one)

I don't know how to ride a bike manually so automatic is for me. The 700 is a HUGE stretch from a 300 to me. It's mostly so I can ride with my hubs when he is on his BMW. I don't like the sport riding position so hate being on the back which is what started the whole Vespa thang 🙂

Maybe a CanAm Spyder down the road? Other than that, being 5'3" I think I'll enjoy my CTX for some time!

Drive a few around, see what floats your boat and enjoy LIFE! Blessings CK
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you everyone for your input!

bare with me as I begin to respond to each and everyone one of you! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Keep an eye on the local shops. Several around me have test ride days. Go to them and try them there without making any commitments.
really great point here!

When I got my M endorsement, I was looking online for used bike's for my first bike and came across the CTX. The dealer didnt let me test drive, so I took a chance and found it to be a wonderful starter bike for me. I definitely agree, next bike I moved to I am sure as heck going to insist on test riding it. Also, trying out different bikes will definitely help me make a decision on which bike to go to next.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you typed that up, you've reached that point. Just be realistic about what you are losing vs. gaining.


I've lasted about 10 months on the CTX. Good all around bike. Extreme variety for luggage options. 67 mpg :), no passing power. Also, since I bought new old stock, I lost about $500 and fees on trade. Got a used Harley V-ROD, awesome passing power, p$$$ poor fuel economy, ZERO luggage options, but puts a smile on my face every time I ride it.


BMW, Triumph and Harley dealers allow test rides, shop around for Honda/Yamaha/Kawi dealer that also allow test rides or Demo days. Set the budget and make a list of what you want on the bike.
I test rode the BMW F800GT and loved the bike, but hated the riding position. Try it before you buy it.
A ton of great points!

I do think often about what I would gain vs. what I would lose. What I would lose is a bike that is fully paid for, plenty of accessories added to the bike, really easy to ride, low maintenance, going to the shopping with the bike and utilizing all my storage options (my wife is amazed at what I can fit in my SHAD cases), great bike for around town, and good highway cruiser (assuming cruising is all you had in mind), light weight bike, and giving up a great bike that I do enjoy riding. Now as far as the gains, scratching an inch of the grass might be greener with another bike.

I think that is what I am in conflict with myself about, and Steve hit the nail on the head is that I unfortunately found a great bike right out the gate. Its my experience with other bikes that I think I am missing that plagues me.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Only you can answer that question for yourself. As others have pointed out, dealers have demo days or have liberal test ride policies. The fact that you've spent a year riding before the question really coming up says something. Each bike out there has tradeoffs, you just need to decide what you're comfortable with giving up/getting in the exchange.

This is my advice, take it for what it's worth, considering my known and documented lack of experience thus far (dang hands!):

- Do some research on some bikes you're interested in
- Test ride as many of those bikes as you can. With regards to HDs, they have the Eagle Rider program where you can rent bikes if you want to do some more long term and/or long distance testing
- Narrow it down between those you've chosen
- Decide if the tradeoffs are worth going with a new (or new to you) scoot, or sticking with the CTX

Don't forget that you can modify any bike to be more comfortable/to your liking. I agree with your friend that a Sportster isn't designed to be a super long distance bike (lack of a 6th gear chief among them, IMHO), but it doesn't mean it can't be made better. Great Egret on YouTube took a month-long ride on Route 66 on his Iron 883. He made significant changes with the seat/bars/etc. to suit his needs. Every rider will be different.

Most important thing is to be honest with yourself. Do you love the CTX in every way but just wish you had a bit more 'oomph'? If so, maybe the CTX1300 is a better choice than jumping ship completely just for more CCs. Unless you're planning on taking more/longer trips in the future, it might not be worth spending the extra money just to get better acceleration.

Best part is, you already have a sweet scoot. Take your time and chew over this for a bit. Other bikes will always be there.

For what it's worth, one of the bikes I was heavily considering is the Kawasaki Vulcan S. Same engine as in the Ninja 650, but in cruiser form. ABS. Seat/handlebars/pegs are adjustable (3 settings for each, IIRC).

I'll have my Iron back in 6 days from the shop and plan on taking some trips around upstate NY. I'll report back how it goes as far as comfort, etc. :)
Doing research is definitely my number one priority as well as tons of test rides. I think because I customized my CTX to my liking it makes it that much harder to think about moving on. Its the "what if" game that my mind is playing and eye candy isn't helping :) For example, I saw on the forum that someone had a BMW KS1200, and OMG WOW that is beautiful bike!

I am definitely going look out for dealer demo days. Maybe what I am going through can be solved by going through the process of looking at other bikes, testing driving, comparing, etc..
 

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Discussion Starter #17
howdy, my Dad , may he rest in peace, would say better not to jump out of the frying pan into the fire. you obviously can live with what you have and can use more experience before getting on a wreck waiting to happen after the squeals of delight. i'd reccomend waiting a bit in case i wasn't clear.
ken
My father used to tell me all the time that its "free" to think. what he forgot to mention that the mental torment was a bundled deal :p

The good news here, there is no set date or deadline. I agree very much with your fathers words. I do not plan to make any immediate moves now; however, I plan to use this riding session to continue to think about where do I go from here.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When it doesn't meet your expectations, or needs. And then, be prepared to do it again with your next purchase. In 58 years of riding I've owned Several Harley's, a few Honda's, Bultaco' s, Can-Am's, and Kawasaki's, one Yamaha, one Suzuki, a Vespa, and a Norton. Soon after I switch from a dirt bike to a street bike, I start thinking about how much more fun the dirt bike was, and vice-versa. Oh, man! That grass is really greener on the other side...
Dave,

I value your sage advice. I am on riding year 1 and 57 more to go :)

I am very curious about your various moves. Did you notice a common theme when you would transition from one to another or was the decision to move on based on what made sense at that point in your life? Also, I am looking into the Eaglerider program. thank you for this suggestion!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The point is when you consider it, you are already past that point. Now comes research and reasoning. All of it is on you, financial, purpose etc.

There are a ton of different bikes to choose from. You don't even have to change class if you don't want to, just get a more powerful cruiser if that is what you like. Or change class, the variations are great and tweaking ability to please is even greater. When you say more power, that doesn't necessarily mean get a RR, that is a common misconception. There are different power classes in each type class.

I suggest first start with type. Sit on a cruiser, standard, adventure, sport tour, sport, RR etc. and see what fits you best for your comfort and maneuverability. Forget what they all have or don't have, you need to figure this comfort and maneuverability out first. Once you figure that out, the rest is easily narrowed. If you skip this step, you will most likely be changing again.

Without a sense of urgency, desire loses its value. -- Jim Rohn
Very sound logic and advice! I am definately going to apply that when I go to the various dealerships.

Also, I wanted to add that experience like this is where I am very much lacking about motorcycles. To provide additional insight as to why this topic came up for me, I better explain my initial thought as to why I wanted to get into motorcycling and what I envision it would be like and how I would use the motorcycle. Prior to my wife and I getting married, I had a number of ambitions of things I wanted to do but where I live, cost of living, and employer at the time steered me to playing it safe. Fast forward 15 years, My wife and I joined the typical grind of a mortgage, two kids, dog, etc.. With this said, a year ago I started thinking about my old ambition of getting a motorcycle and experiencing that part of life in which I bit the bullet and pursued getting my license and purchasing my first bike.

Prior to experiencing my first ride, I have always envisioned myself as someone on a cruiser type bike with no where to be but experiencing a leisure ride. After experiencing my first ride, I learned first hand that Cagers are Crazy and cannot be trusted. On my last ride, it was a nice day and traffic medium. I found myself often driving in the far right lane with the exception of moving over to the passing lane to let other motorists force merge themselves on the highway. There was two occasions during that ride where I had to accelerate to pass an oncoming merge where I felt the CTX struggling to pass since the motorist, in the lane I was switching to, decided they didn't want me to change lanes and sped up on purpose causing me to almost cancel the lane changed that I committed to making.

Writing out the above, I think I see my dilemma. The CTX is a great choice for me, but my environment challenges my decision in vehicle choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well I am moving UP from a Vespa 300 (although Im keeping it to tour with my hubby's matching one)

I don't know how to ride a bike manually so automatic is for me. The 700 is a HUGE stretch from a 300 to me. It's mostly so I can ride with my hubs when he is on his BMW. I don't like the sport riding position so hate being on the back which is what started the whole Vespa thang 🙂

Maybe a CanAm Spyder down the road? Other than that, being 5'3" I think I'll enjoy my CTX for some time!

Drive a few around, see what floats your boat and enjoy LIFE! Blessings CK
Dont get me wrong, the CTX has been a fantastic bike and congrats to you for joining the CTXers! :)

I am going to give myself this riding season to think about, test ride, etc.. about what I plan to do for next riding seasons. As far as CanAm is concern, definitely a neat design and will give it some serious thought!
 
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