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I have a close relative that always was interested in riding but never had the time, now he's retired he has all the time in the world to do whatever he wants. He had a bit of riding experience in the past but been out for a long time. I recommend the new 2013 Honda CTX700 to him since hes looking to ride and focus on just that. From what I have read the 2013 Honda CTX700ND comes with a automatic transmission, I think this will be perfect so he can just focus on riding and not have to worry about shifting gears. What do you guys think is it suitable for a slightly new rider?
 

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Well tell your friend that the CTX700 will be one of the most comfortable cruisers and he won't regret it. The seating position is just natural with no pain and fatigue to the knee bend and for the average rider should be able to flatfoot this beast without any problem. And yes the CTX700N comes bundles with ABS and a dual clutch shifter so no worries about footing for the shift. I'd recommend it.
 

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For new riders, I would recommend at maximum a 250cc bike. The CTX700 would be too powerful at 670cc. I would buy something like a used cbr250 and get some mileage on that before tackling something stronger.
 

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For new riders, I would recommend at maximum a 250cc bike. The CTX700 would be too powerful at 670cc. I would buy something like a used cbr250 and get some mileage on that before tackling something stronger.
Starting with a CBR250 is a good suggestion but it seems a lot of people that have intentions of upgrading to a much more powerful bike get bored of the CBR250 quickly, to the point they wasted their money.

I would suggest the new Honda CBR500, it's not too powerful and not something someone will get bored of quickly.
 

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now he's retired he has all the time in the world to do whatever he wants. He had a bit of riding experience in the past but been out for a long time.
Just depends on his riding experience in the past and for how long exactly. The CTX700 does have a higher displace than your starter bike but however for a bike in this class its considered to be a sluggish 670cc and with only an output of 48hp with a combining weight of 500lbs its not a fast bike. The DCT auto transmission and ABS does make the CTX700 a more user or novice friendly though.
 

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Like what BikerDan said it all does depend on how comfortable and how much experience your friend has. It's not a bad idea to start with a lower displacement bike but its gets boring real fast. And not only that with a 250cc you might suffer from the freeway speeds. So take where and how your going to ride it in to consideration.
 

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If you are a new rider,

1. I would take a rider safety course, it will also lower your insurance rate a little, but mostly teach what you need to know before getting out there on the street.

If you are thinking of riding two up, a rider and passenger
The CTX700 is a longer bike that can handle two people better than a smaller bike can.

I sat on the CB500F at the dealer, it is a little smaller bike, but power to weight ratio is about the same as the CTX700 and NC700 series,

The Maintenance would cost a little less on the CTX and NC bikes also better fuel economy on these bikes over the CB500
 

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In most cases the licensing system is graduated so the first license expires with in 2 months and it pretty much forces you to go for the next test which involves riding. So taking the course for new riders would help and educated for the safest riding positions. I had to deal with this system myself.
 

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Thanks for making this thread guys it gave me a lot of insight on what to do as a new rider and luckily for me the CTX700 seems to meet all the criteria in my books. For me it would be one of the most seating positions so far unlike the super sport bikes.
 

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Not only is it suitable for the friend you describe, the CTX was conceived, designed and built precisely for him, particularly the DCT/ABS model. I would certainly encourage him to go ahead and pull the ripcord on one. The handling is somewhat scooter-like and it is hard to imagine him not being quite happy with it.

The ONLY way he could not like it, is if an inner motorhead-speed demon emerges whose wild desires could only be fulfilled by a Hayabusa. If that occurs, he can always sell the CTX or give it to his new hotty girlfriend, which he will undoubtedly have once he becomes a sport bike speed-crazed wild man. I confess, the CTX has me thinking hard about a Triumph Street Triple.

Other than that possible outcome, he will be at one with the CTX DCT.
 

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The handling is somewhat scooter-like and it is hard to imagine him not being quite happy with it.
QUOTE]

I would not say it is scooter like as I still ride my SH150 scooter to work (3 miles one way). Scooter is much smaller and nimbler. The CTX is much more stable at highway speeds than the scoot. More comfortable for longer distances. The CTX has a reported top speed of over 100 mph. Should be fast enough for most. The vast majority of highways are NOT designed for traffic at that speed. That is DESIGNED, not the posted speed limit. The ones I have seen the plans for are designed for approx. 15-25 miles over the speed limit.
 

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I think it depends on the individual. Size of the individual. Relative experience and general health and degree of what could be called clutziness.

Some people should start with a tricycle and work up others would probably do OK with a big old Harley. Problem is of course it's hard to measure the above parameters and over confidence can bite you hard. I tend to believe smaller is better in this case but I agree that for some/many the CTX 700 should be fine.
 

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The handling is somewhat scooter-like and it is hard to imagine him not being quite happy with it.
QUOTE]

I would not say it is scooter like as I still ride my SH150 scooter to work (3 miles one way). Scooter is much smaller and nimbler. The CTX is much more stable at highway speeds than the scoot. More comfortable for longer distances. The CTX has a reported top speed of over 100 mph. Should be fast enough for most. The vast majority of highways are NOT designed for traffic at that speed. That is DESIGNED, not the posted speed limit. The ones I have seen the plans for are designed for approx. 15-25 miles over the speed limit.
Well, ok, not super scooter-like, but I was commuting on the PCX-125 to work before buying the CTX. I was struck by how easy it was balance-wise to transition to the CTX. It is better at paddling about a parking lot, than say, a Ducati Monster, or something.
 

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Well, ok, not super scooter-like, but I was commuting on the PCX-125 to work before buying the CTX. I was struck by how easy it was balance-wise to transition to the CTX. It is better at paddling about a parking lot, than say, a Ducati Monster, or something.
Its just an easy, well mannered bike to ride and its size is small enough for most to handle without any difficulty and large enough to continue riding once the rider becomes more experienced and broadens their horizons. Not to diss small scooter riders, I have one in the driveway myself, but the comparison is like trying to ride a bicycle on the freeway. Its perfect for city commuting where speeds of 30-50mph are the norm.
 

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I've had many m/c's through the years and 3 scooters (scooters were 250, 400, and 600cc) and I think the CTX is a very easy bike to ride but also very comfortable. I know I have said this on a few other posts but this bike is by far the most balanced bike I have ever ridden. But it has enough power where you can get in trouble with it. If you listen to the "Marketing" of this bike they say it is good for beginners. It is a good bike for beginners but it can, and will, get you in trouble if you aren't careful with the throttle.
 

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My 2 cents...

The ctx700 can be a good first/re entry bike. But you still have to give it respect.

It is not a 600cc sports bike, but it will get you up to 60 faster and do the quarter mile faster than any "cruiser" + or - 100cc. In fact, iirc it will even beat the 883. I had a c50t, that almost mimics the output of the ctx700. So, while the hp and torque are not mind blowing, they can scare some people.

So, while a few people could quickly out grow it, some people could be intimidated by it. This will show it self in 2 or 3 years when some of the 2014 have less than 1000 miles.

But having put in my 2 cents now, if you have had some riding experience, and have basic skills, the ctx700 could be a great bike.
 

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I kinda find the argument a bit silly to tell you the truth. I don't se anyone rushing out to learn how to drive a caged vehicle in a go-cart nor do I find anyone complaining when someone decides to learn how to drive in a Honda Civic which by the way has plenty of power to get into trouble if mishandled. I would much prefer one of my kids learn to ride on the CTX than a 500 cc sport bike and I certainly wouldn't want them to try riding on the freeway/hwy on a 250cc Honda Rebel.
 

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I see your point.

For driving a car, however, most people are not just given keys and let loose on the world with no training.

That does happen quite a bit on motorcycles.

When my kids want to learn to ride, they will take a training course first before ever considering what bike would make sense. After the training course that offers some hands on experience, they would have a better idea of what feels comfortable.

Should have said, if you don't know the difference between a brake lever and clutch lever, no motorcycle is a good first bike. If you do, then the CTX700 can be a great bike.
 

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I agree completely. Many States now require the MSF as a requirement to get a license to ride a MC and I highly recommend those that don't take it. Learning to ride is a slow process that takes patience, skill and confidence building. No one should ever be given keys to ride off into the sunset without spending considerable time practice riding.

I like to teach the 15mph step curriculum. Start off in a parking lot under the guidance of an experienced rider where speeds do not exceed 15 mph. Once mastered, slow city streets can be progressed to where speeds do not exceed 30 mph. Once comfortable at these speeds, progress to the next step riding on city streets at 45mph. Frwy/hwy speeds of 60 mph is next. This process can take weeks or months depending on the rider. At any point in the process the rider becomes uncomfortable or their confidence level becomes a problem then its time to stop and re-evaluate whether they wish to continue or restrict themselves. I know several who ride city streets all day long without any problems but refuse to ride at the higher speeds.

I've taught many to ride using this process over the years and it has been very successful.
 
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