Teaching someone to ride - Page 2 - Honda CTX700 Forum
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post #11 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 11:56 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Sloppyburpfest View Post
Speaking as someone who has taught the MSF course for 20+ years, my advice is:

1. Would you get on an airplane if you knew the pilot was "taught" to fly by their layman friends? Ultimately this is someone's safety we're talking about.

2. Even though I am a competent teacher, I still would not teach my own friends and family to ride. Students will learn better from impartial strangers. When you learn from someone you know, there are all kinds of hidden emotions that will get in the way. Learning a new physical skill is hard enough without having to deal with extra emotional baggage.

3. If you must teach someone, make sure they are wearing all the proper safety gear, they are well hydrated, you have a quiet empty parking lot to work in and your personal liability insurance is up to date.

-Sloppy

I understand what you and Bob are getting at, but she doesn't want anyone other than me teaching her. I tried to get her to take the course, just so she could have her license all in one weekend (in Oklahoma, you take the written test, then 30 days later the driving test. During those 30 days you can ride within 100 feet of a licensed motorcyclist). But this is the way she wants to do it and I'm smarter than to treat a 58 year old woman like a kid.


I already have the parking lot picked out, and figuring out some cone patterns and class outline from MSF videos.


Believe me Bob..... I'd rather be eating wings and drinkin beer while she takes the MSF class..... but instead, my day is going to be filled with eyerolls and "pffffffttttt"'s

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post #12 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Bachelor View Post
I understand what you and Bob are getting at, but she doesn't want anyone other than me teaching her. I tried to get her to take the course, just so she could have her license all in one weekend (in Oklahoma, you take the written test, then 30 days later the driving test. During those 30 days you can ride within 100 feet of a licensed motorcyclist). But this is the way she wants to do it and I'm smarter than to treat a 58 year old woman like a kid.


I already have the parking lot picked out, and figuring out some cone patterns and class outline from MSF videos.


Believe me Bob..... I'd rather be eating wings and drinkin beer while she takes the MSF class..... but instead, my day is going to be filled with eyerolls and "pffffffttttt"'s
Perhaps you can minimize eye fatigue by getting her to browse thru any number of helpful short videos you can pull up in a YouTube search for "how to drive a motor scooter." That would still be within the "only you can watch her" rule.
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post #13 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 12:28 PM
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When I went back to two wheels 8 years ago, I had ridden all my life bicycle, but the last time on motorcycle was 35 years ago. The first summer I rode a Chinese electric scooter, shoppings and other activities as much as possible. If you have good practice in driving car, as I had, you know traffic rules and may understand what drivers think and what they don't think. It is a small plus, but then you understand that even you have not been a perfect car driver. But the most important thing is your own will to learn to ride.
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post #14 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 12:48 PM
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baby steps. Get the skills slow & perfect, so they're automatic, then move on to the next baby step
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post #15 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 02:55 PM
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More good points.... Thank you.... and no waving!!!!
You're welcome

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post #16 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 03:41 PM
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If a MSF course is not in the cards because of financial reasons, I will gladly donate 100% of the funds towards proper training.
It’s important and maybe life saving.
If it’s not in the cards for other reasons, then forgive me for being presumptuous.

Glenn
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post #17 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 04:47 PM
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I know I am going to ruffle feathers here. Many riders have had motorcycles for years and are still living. Years ado I never heard of a course. If she was a 16 year old and had never drive anything my opinion might be differant. I never took a course and according to many friends and riders I have come a long way. You have found a safe parking lot, she has gear and a relativly small under powered machine. Get some tennis balls, cut them in half and use them as a course. Spread them out a lot and give her lots of room. Given time she will build confidence and get the feel of the bike. Slowly make the obstacles more of a challenge. She can watch many videos of how to do various manouvers. Let her learn at her own speed. I watched many then tried to do them and eventually learned much like everything else in life. Once she is a little bit more assured walk away and let her learn on her own with you not watching. I have nothing against the courses but I I have seen to many take our courses her and in 2 days basicly on a moped they are qualified to go and buy a Goldwing. Thats were the problem lies. Maybe your courses are differant than ours but I have seen and rode with a lot of unqualified riders. Stop and think about this. How many of you older folks took driving lessons to drive a car or truck 5o years ago. Seems you made it on your own. Give it a try and she may decide that she wants to take a course.
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post #18 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by The_Bachelor View Post
This week, my wife gets her scooter. I am tasked with teaching her how to ride it. In a couple of days, we are heading to an empty parking lot and starting the process. A MSF course is not in the cards.

Iím looking for ideas on what to teach her...... Your thoughts?
How to sign up for a motorcycle safety course....

What is her reluctance to take a course? The instructors are specifically trained to deal with riders who are hesitant or even fearful. Some students don't even ride bikes, but can learn how to ride a motorcycle.

Instructors are objective and are not personally involved: they take concerns are presented and deal with them.

Last thought: is there something you could trade: she takes the course and you do X?

good luck
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post #19 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 01:17 AM
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Many moons ago, my wife had a new Rebel 250. Being very self conscious & bit low on self confidence, she feared learning to ride (shift, turn, handle) in front of total strangers (& me). Soon, she overcame the dread, signed up & passed the class, (I did not attend). Even though she did not put many miles on that bike, years later, when we toured with other couples, all on their own bikes, I was so proud of her determination & success at riding well. She accomplished what, previously, she did not know she could.
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post #20 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 05:25 AM
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I taught myself on uninhabited back roads and wide open parking lots near my home. Lots of YouTube videos, reading the state motorcycle test booklet, aced the test. Every time out I challenge myself with something different to get more and more comfortable and experienced. I stayed on roads where speed limit never exceeds 40mph. A tall bicycle with the seat up high enough that I had to tip toe when stopped helped out a lot with balancing at stopping 1-3 mph.

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